Category History Podcasts

The Ulster Covenant
History Podcasts

The Ulster Covenant

The Ulster Covenant was signed by over 500,000 people. The Ulster Covenant, combined with the creation of the Ulster Volunteers, seemed to many to signify Ireland's drift towards civil war. Those who signed the Ulster Covenant were against Home Rule and all that it stood for. Ulster's Solemn League and Covenant Being convinced in our consciences that Home Rule would be disastrous to the material well-being of Ulster as well as of the whole of Ireland, subversive of our civil and religious freedom, destructive of our citizenship and perilous to the unity of the Empire, we, whose names are underwritten, men of Ulster, loyal subjects of his Gracious Majesty King George V, humbly relying on the God whom our fathers in days of stress and trial confidently trusted, do hereby pledge ourselves in solemn Covenant throughout this our time of threatened calamity to stand by one another in defending for ourselves and our children our cherished position of equal citizenship in the United Kingdom and in using all means which may be found necessary to defeat the present conspiracy to set up a Home Rule Parliament in Ireland.

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History Podcasts

Moral Panic

Moral panic is a term used to describe media presentation of something that has happened that the public will react to in a panicky manner. Moral panic has a tendency to exaggerate statistics and to create a bogey-man, known as a folk-devil in sociological terms. In recent years moral panic and media presentation have covered a wide-ranging number of topics from HIV/AIDS in the 1980's to asylum seekers into the UK in the 2000's.
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History Podcasts

Sociological Theories

A sociological theory is a set of ideas that provides an explanation for human society. Theories are selective in terms of their priorities and perspectives and the data they define as significant. As a result they provide a particular and partial view of reality. Sociological theories can be grouped together according to a variety of criteria.
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History Podcasts

What is the Truth?

What constitutes the truth? Sociologists are bombarded with data that purports to be the truth even when said data seems to diametrically oppose other available data. Data is usually interpreted and when this happens is truth the victim of researchers using the data that they want and ignoring the other information that might undermine what they believe?
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History Podcasts

Ethnomethodology

Ethnomethodology is a study concerned with the methods used by people to construct, account for and give meaning to their social world. Ethnomethodology means a study of the methods used by people. Ethnomethodologists such as Schutz believe there is no real social order, as other sociological perspectives assume.
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History Podcasts

Key beliefs of functionalism

There are a number of basics beliefs that underpin functionalism. These beliefs surround education, religion, the family, crime and the media. Education : To functionalists, a comparative can be drawn from education to a major organ in the human body that is a vital and integral part of the whole system.
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History Podcasts

The Cockleshell Heroes of 1942

The Cockleshell Heroes raided Nazi-occupied Bordeaux in December 1942 in 'Operation Frankton'. The Cockleshell Heroes target was the harbour complex in the city. The port was very important to the Germans as many merchant ships used it to supply the German Army stationed not only in France but also elsewhere throughout occupied Europe.
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History Podcasts

Double VC winners

Only 3 men have won two VC's in the history of the medal. The double VC holders were Surgeon Captain Arthur Martin-Leake, Captain Noel Chavasse and Captain Charles Upham. Surgeon Captain Arthur Martin-Leake won his first VC in 1902 during the Boer War. He treated a wounded soldier just 100 metres from the enemy's line.
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History Podcasts

Swordfish

The Swordfish, a torpedo-carrying plane primarily carried on board British aircraft carriers, played a vital part in the destruction of the Bismarck in May 1941. The Swordfish was a bi-plane and by the standards of World War Two, the plane was slow and a veteran. However, when required to do so, the Swordfish carried quite a punch.
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History Podcasts

Boulton-Paul Defiant

The Boulton Paul Defiant's part in the early stages of World War Two have effectively been overshadowed by the Hurricane and Spitfire. However, the Boulton Paul Defiant was to play an important role in trying to stop the advance of the Germans into Belgium and France in the Spring of 1940. But against the fighter planes of the Luftwaffe it stood little chance once they realised that the plane had an Achilles heel when attacked.
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History Podcasts

Grumman F6F Hellcat

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was the principal carrier-based fighter America had in the Pacific War. The Grumman F6F Hellcat helped to seriously damage Japan's naval power at the Battle of the Philippines in June 1944 and proved to be a highly reliable and potent fighter. The popularity of the Hellcat can be seen in the number ordered by the military and the number carried by carrier forces.
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History Podcasts

P-38 Lightning

The P-38 Lightning was one of the more successful planes of World War Two. The P-38 Lightning, seen flying in formation in the photo, was designed by Lockheed. The P-38 was a fast and manouvrable plane that could be used in a wide range of roles. The pilot and the P38's armaments were in the central nacelle.
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History Podcasts

Mosquito

The Mosquito was one of the most remarkable planes of World War Two. The Mosquito - in full the De Havilland DH-98 Mosquito - was a twin-engine, two-seat bomber that was modified to serve as a fighter which could operate during the day or at night or as a photoreconnaissance plane. In whatever capacity, the Mosquito proved to be immensely successful - for a 'wooden' plane.
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History Podcasts

The Great Famine

The Great Famine The Soviet Union's 'Great Famine' between 1932 and 1933 may have resulted in the deaths of nine million people. The 'Great Famine' was a man-made affair and was introduced to attack a class of people - the peasants -who were simply not trusted by Joseph Stalin. There is little doubt that Joseph Stalin, the USSR's leader, knew about this policy.
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History Podcasts

Messerschmitt 110

The Messerschmitt 110 was originally designed as a twin engined fighter. The Messerschmitt 110 first flew in May 1936 and by August 1939, the Luftwaffe had 159 110Cs available for the blitzkrieg attack on Poland. The Me 110 proved a valuable plane to the Luftwaffe in the Polish campaign - though it was up against old fashioned fighters in the Polish Air Force.
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History Podcasts

Mussolini and the Roman Catholic Church

Mussolini and the Roman Catholic Church Mussolini had to foster good relations with the Roman Catholic Church simply because, regardless of his dictatorship, the Roman Catholic Church was such a powerful institution in Italy. While Mussolini governed the political side of Italy, the Roman Catholic Church governed the spiritual side.
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History Podcasts

Guernica

Guernica In April 1937, Guernica was the first city to be deliberately targeted for aerial bombing. Guernica was the ancient capital of the Basques - a group who had withstood the advances of the army since the Spanish Civil War begun in 1936. The region's resilient stand was punished by Franco when he allowed the unprotected city to be bombed by Hitler's air force.
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History Podcasts

Dornier Do 17

The Dornier 17, along with the Heinkel III and Junkers Ju 88, were the mainstay of the German bombers during the Blitz on Britain and especially London. In the days of the Battle of Britain, the Dornier 17 had been an easy target for the Spitfires and Hurricanes of Fighter Command but had proved itself to be a valuable part of the Luftwaffe in campaigns that led up to this battle.
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History Podcasts

Europe in 1945

Europe in 1945 Europe by the summer of 1945 was very different to the Europe that had started out on war in September 1939. The Allies (USA, Britain and France) had started to fall out with Stalin's Russia during the war itself. Stalin had wanted the Allies to start a second front in 1943. This, the Allies claimed, was not possible.
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History Podcasts

HMS Hood

HMS Hood was the pride of the Royal Navy. HMS Hood was a massively armed battlecruiser with what was thought to be armour equal to her armaments. To all intents, HMS Hood was considered to be one of the most powerful battlecruisers afloat in World War Two. HMS Hood was 44,600 tons, had a crew of 1,419 and was faster than the Bismarck with a maximum speed of 32 knots.
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History Podcasts

Atomic Bomb

The atomic bomb was first used in warfare at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 and the bomb played a key role in ending World War Two. The atomic bomb (A bomb), created via the Manhattan Project, was first exploded at the top secret base of Alamogordo on July 16th, 1945. A reconstruction of 'Little Boy' at the Imperial War Museum The bomb that dropped on Hiroshima was code-named 'Little Boy'.
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