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Richard (Dickie) Bond

Richard (Dickie) Bond


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Richard (Dickie) Bond was born at Garstang, on 14th December, 1883. He played football for the Royal Field Artillery before joining Preston North End in 1902. Bond made his debut in an FA Cup tie against Bishop Auckland in December 1902 and scored in the 3-1 win. He also scored in his second game against Stockport County.

Bond, a fast and direct outside right, helped Preston North End win promotion to the First Division of the Football League in his second season at the club. In the 1903-1904 season Preston won the Second Division title by winning 20, and drawing 10, of its 34 games.

On 25th February, 1905, Bond won his first international cap when he played in the England side that drew 1-1 with Ireland. The following month he was in the side that beat Wales 3-1. He failed to score in these two games but did get a couple in his next international game in the 5-0 win against Ireland in February 1906.

Bond was a member of the Preston North End side that finished second to Liverpool in the 1905-1906 season. He played a major role in this success ending up the season's top scorer with 17 goals.

Preston form over the next three seasons was disappointing: 1906-1907 (14th), 1907-1908 (12th) 1908-1909 (10th). Bond left the club in 1909. In the six seasons he had been at Preston he had scored 34 goals in 148 games.

Bond joined Bradford City, who had come close to relegation the previous season. He had an immediate impact and helped his new team to obtain 7th place in the 1909-10 season (Preston North End was 12th). Bond also featured in Bradford's 1911 FA Cup run. However, he missed the final against Newcastle United because he had been suspended for using "improper language" to the crowd at a game against Arsenal.

During the First World War Bond joined the British Army and while serving on the Western Front in France he was captured by the Germans.

After the war Bond returned to Bradford City. All told, he played for the club for twelve years and managed to score 60 goals in 301 games. He also played three more times for England during this period ending up with a total of eight caps. At the age of 39 he had one season at Blackburn Rovers (2 goals in 24 games). After that he played in non-league football with Lancaster Town and Garstang.

Richard (Dickie) Bond died in 1955.


Richard Bond appointed to be a Circuit Judge

Citadel Chambers is delighted to announce the appointment of Richard Bond to the Circuit Bench. He was called to the Bar in 1988, undertook pupillage at Coleridge Chambers and remained a tenant there until the formation of Citadel by the merger between Coleridge and No. 4 Fountain Court.

The Lord Chief Justice has assigned him to the Midland Circuit, based at Birmingham Crown Court, with effect from Monday 10th June 2013.

His Honour Judge Bond is the 15th member of Chambers to be appointed to the High Court or Circuit Bench in 19 years. We venture to suggest that this significant achievement is unlikely to be matched by any other set of Chambers !

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Fleming on Chopping

“I want to commission you to paint me a picture which afterwards can be used as a cover for one of my books. First of all, will you please do the jacket and, secondly, will you please have a brilliant idea?”

“I decided to approach Dickie Chopping, who is probably the finest trompe-l’oeil painter in the world and for whose work I have a great admiration.”

Fleming inscribed the 1957 book From Russia With Love:

“To Dickie Chopping/The Executioner/From Ian.”

and later commented:

“The Chopping jacket was a tremendous success, both in England and America, and from that day on he and I and Michael Howard of Cape’s have devised all the James Bond jackets, which have now become something of a hallmark with the book trade and have earned prizes for Cape’s.”

He also told him in a 1956 letter:

“Of one thing I am certain. Your picture will vastly help to sell the book”.

On March 18, 1959, Fleming wrote to Chopping referring to the Goldfinger cover and his upcoming work For Your Eyes Only.

‘The new jacket is quite as big a success as the first one and I do think Cape [Fleming’s publisher Jonathan Cape] have made a splendid job of it…I am busily scratching my head trying to think of a subject for you again. No one in the history of thrillers has had such a totally brilliant artistic collaborator!’

“First of all a thousand congratulations on the new jacket. It is quite in your topmost class and Annie loves it also. You and I are really a wonderful team.”

On July 20, 1960, Fleming asked Chopping if he would illustrate his next book, Thunderball:

“Dear Dickie. Warmest thanks for your charming letter of July 29, and I am delighted that you will have a bash at the new jacket.

“I will ask Michael Howard [of Jonathan Cape] to produce an elegant skeleton hand and an elegant Queen of Hearts. As to the dagger, I really have no strong views. I had thought of the ordinary flick knife as used by teenagers on people like you and me, but if you have a nice dagger in mind please let us use it. The title of the book will be Thunderball. It is immensely long, immensely dull and only your jacket can save it!’

‘Two cards will definitely be better than one, and the second card should be an ace – perhaps the Ace of Spades – if you can bear the additional labour. Secondly, I think, unless you feel otherwise, that the Queen of Diamonds would be better that the Queen of Hearts as money is a keynote of the book.’


Dickie Moltisanti

Richard "Dickie" Moltisanti was a soldier in the Soprano Crew. Died in the mid-1970s, Married to Joanne Moltisanti (née Blundetto), father of Christopher Moltisanti and cousin to Carmela Soprano (née DeAngelis). Dickie was in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War and later served time in prison, making it unlikely that he spent much time with his family when he was alive.

Dickie was killed during Christopher's infancy, right outside the house while bringing TV trays home. In 2002, Tony Soprano told Christopher that Dickie's killer was Detective Lt. Barry Haydu, who had just retired from the force. Tony delivered Haydu to Christopher Moltisanti as a part of his process of bonding Chris to him and slowly easing him up the family hierarchy. However, when confronted by Christopher, Haydu denied ever having heard of Richard Moltisanti and claimed that someone was "obviously" setting him up. Later Haydu inadvertently admitted knowing Dickie Moltisanti by stating "Look, whoever told you I had anything to do with his death is lying!" before Christopher mentioned his father's death.

Tony Soprano remembers Dickie as a "stand up guy" and describes a lot of his positive qualities to Christopher. Dickie once took on a whole crew from New England and brought the war home to their turf. Tony also remembers that Dickie was killed because of a beef with Jilly Ruffalo, a man he was in prison with. Jilly murdered Dickie's cell mate and Dickie gouged out his eye in revenge.

According to Christopher, Dickie also struggled with problems of alcoholism and drug addiction.


Fear and Outrage

The coffin of Lord Mountbatten at the Westminster Abbey State funeral as members of the Royal Family, (left-right) Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Prince Charles, look on.

Bentley Archive/Popperfoto/Getty Images

The August 27 attacks lead to widespread fear and outrage in the region, according to Lewis.

“The indiscriminate nature of the attack led many to condemn the IRA as savage and cowardly,” he says. 𠇊t the same time, the sophistication of the bomb—it was detonated by radio remote control𠅌oupled with the Warrenpoint ambush suggested that the IRA was becoming more dangerous and capable. This combination—savagery coupled with tactical competence—was very unsettling.”

Among the English, the reaction in Parliament, newspapers and newscasts, was outrage. O’Leary, who grew up in Northern Ireland and Sudan, points out that Mountbatten had been a war hero and important mentor to Prince Charles. His killing and that of his grandchild and his daughter’s mother-in-law ”were regarded as especially outrageous.” In Ireland, he adds, there was outrage that a guest had been killed, as well as children and a woman who had no public or security force connections.

“Ulster Unionists called for increased security, and called the Republic of Ireland a safe haven for terrorists—in fact, the Irish police were able to identify and convict the organizer of the bombing of Mountbatten’s boat with forensic evidence,” O’Leary says. He adds that among those who were sympathetic to the IRA’s causes, more supported the attack of soldiers from the Parachute Regiment, which had been behind the massacre of civilians on Bloody Sunday in January 1972, than the murder of an elderly, retired grandfather and his family.

Margaret Thatcher, elected prime minister just before the assassination, saw the IRA as a criminal, rather than political, organization. She responded by withdrawing political rights associated with prisoner of war status for IRA prisoners. The IRA responded in turn with a hunger strike. The leader of the hunger strike, Irish nationalist Bobby Sands, was then elected to British Parliament but would die in prison from his hunger strike on May 5, 1981. Ultimately, White says, the murder of Mountbatten and his family signaled a raw, dark period ahead for England and Northern Ireland. 


Beginning in 1910, six children– Owen, Dick, Adelaide, John, Ella, and Dottie Brennan– were born to Owen Brennan and Nellie Valentine in the Irish Channel neighborhood of New Orleans. Owen worked in the maritime industry until his retirement in the early 1940s. Owen Brennan, the son, was an astute businessman, known for his gregarious personality. He bought the Absinthe House, a bar on Bourbon Street in 1943. Owen Brennan transformed it into an all-night saloon, popular during World War II. In 1946, he bought a restaurant across the street, the Vieux Carré. He renamed it Brennan’s Vieux Carré.

Dickie Brennan

Dickie Brennan is the son of Lynne Trist Brennan and Dick Brennan. He is founder of Dickie Brennan & Company.

Ella Brennan

In 1969 the Brennan family took over Commander’s Palace. That restaurant became Ella Brennan’s priority. Thanks to her,…

Gus Martin

Gus Martin is a chef for Dickie Brennan & Company.

Lally Brennan and Ti Martin

Ti Martin and Lally Brennan are second generation proprietors of Commander’s Palace.

Lynne Trist Brennan

Lynne Trist Brennan is the widow of the late Dick Brennan and mother to Dickie and Lauren Brennan.

Paul Blangé’s Family

Paul Blangé was the first chef of Brennan’s. Paul was a European-trained chef originally from Holland. In this…

Thomas Robey

Thomas Robey was an executive sous-chef at Commander’s Palace.

Ella and Dottie Brennan

Ella and Dottie Brennan are sisters and founding partners of Commander’s Palace.

Beginning in 1910, six children– Owen, Dick, Adelaide, John, Ella, and Dottie Brennan– were born to Owen Brennan and Nellie Valentine in the Irish Channel neighborhood of New Orleans. Owen worked in the maritime industry until his retirement in the early 1940s. Owen Brennan, the son, was an astute businessman, known for his gregarious personality. He bought the Absinthe House, a bar on Bourbon Street in 1943. Owen Brennan transformed it into an all-night saloon, popular during World War II. In 1946, he bought a restaurant across the street, the Vieux Carré. He renamed it Brennan’s Vieux Carré.

When Owen Brennan died in 1955, Ella Brennan and her siblings took over operations. Brennan’s on Bourbon moved to Royal Street in 1956. The family added a second restaurant, Brennan’s of Houston in 1967. Dick, John, Ella, and Adelaide bought Commander’s Palace in 1969. According to the Times-Picayune, the expansion of the Brennan family restaurants caused tension between Owen’s heirs and his siblings. The burgeoning empire split in 1973. Owen’s children, Pip, Jimmy, and Ted, retained ownership of Brennan’s, and Dick, Ella, John, Adelaide, and Dottie maintained Commander’s Palace. In their oral history interview, Ella and Dottie Brennan remember working with chefs to transform the menu, reimaging Commander’s as a haute Creole restaurant.

Thomas Robey and Gus Martin discuss their long-standing tenures as chefs. Gus Martin talks about his long career at Commander’s Palace and his deep reverence for Dick Brennan. Thomas Robey values the wisdom of Ella Brennan, to whom he has often delivered food and from whom he often sought opinion.

As the next generation blossomed, the Brennan family added more restaurants to their New Orleans portfolio. Cousins Ti Martin and Lally Brennan stress the importance of a tight familial bond to their success. As co-proprietors with different strengths, they helped one another better operate Commander’s Palace and its siblings.

Interviews from the Brennan Family of New Orleans oral history project will not be available for public use until May 1, 2019, and then only with specific permission from SFA.


James Bond secrets uncovered: How 007 gave Russia With Love artist perfect murder alibi

Now, after 60 years, his treasure trove of 007 sketches and paintings has gone on display for the first time. Currently housed at the Salisbury Museum, the hoard has been catalogued by Chopping’s executor, heir and biographer, Jon Lys Turner. He said: “In the 50s ‘Dickie’ Chopping could often be found wreaking havoc on the streets of London’s Soho, along with his best friend and fellow artist, Francis Bacon.” And it was Bacon who introduced Chopping to debonair Fleming, via his wife Ann.

Related articles

007’s creator was a keen book collector and, as such, was heavily involved with the jacket designs for his thrillers.

The artist painted from his home studio in Wivenhoe, Essex, that he shared with his partner, the painter Denis Wirth-Miller.

Chopping combined danger with nature to bring James Bond’s incredible world to life.

For each successive Bond book, Chopping gave his paintings a grisly twist, all captured by his preferred artistic style, trompe l’oeil – trick of the eye.

The story behind Chopping’s first 007 commission, 1957’s From Russia With Love, was very much in the vein of a Fleming thriller.

The book was said to be in US President John F Kennedy’s top 10 favourites. The story was serialised in the Daily Express, first in an abridged, multi-part form and then as a comic strip.

Artist Richard Chopping painted the covers of nine of Ian Fleming’s James Bond bestsellers (Image: NC)

Initially, the gun on Chopping’s cover was to have been a .25 Beretta. However, when this weapon proved difficult to source, Fleming borrowed a gun from his own contact, Major Geoffrey Boothroyd, who later became the inspiration for gadget master Q.

While the firearm was in Chopping’s possession, a murder took place in Glasgow using the same type of gun. Luckily, James Bond proved a unique alibi.

The cover for Goldfinger also had a sinister history.

The ominous image featured a human skull with two gold coins placed in the eye sockets and a rose balanced in its mouth.

Chopping painted from real life and the cranium had been sourced from a local doctor. Chopping later found out the skull was from a female Malaysian victim of genocide. Chopping’s eye-catching work was one of the reasons why Bond’s success snowballed.

It made him the highest-paid jacket designer in the world.

Fleming loved the distinctive trompe l’oeil style and dubbed Chopping, “the only English master of the art…who really paints things so you can pick them straight off the canvas”.

Bond author Ian Fleming passed away in 1964 (Image: Express Newspapers)

But the relationship between author and artist became strained.

Chopping was irritated by Fleming’s public claims to have devised the compositions himself while the writer became frustrated that the artist would not sell him the copyright. Fleming would often find himself making excuses to his publisher for Chopping’s late delivery.

Turner explained: “If Chopping had a criticism of Fleming it was that he found him over enthusiastic and threw ideas left right and centre, asking for everything in the picture including the kitchen sink.”

For Fleming’s Japanese-set adventure, You Only Live Twice, Chopping painted a toad pawing a dragonfly.

After wading through the Essex marshes in vain, he finally sourced his amphibian from a friend’s daughter who sneaked it out of the school science lab. Stored in a bell jar, the toad started puffing up.

Chopping thought it was going to die so he released it, allowing it to leap freely around his studio.

Richard Chopping combined danger with nature to bring James Bond’s incredible world to life (Image: Richard Chopping)

Fleming passed away in 1964. During his lifetime, he acknowledged Chopping’s jackets were a tremendous success, both in Britain and America.

They had become something of a “hallmark with the book trade and have earned prizes”.

Chopping’s final two Fleming designs were for The Man With The Golden Gun and Octopussy, published after Fleming’s death. Both feature what became the artist’s signature: the image of a fly.

Displayed in the exhibition, pinned to a piece of cork, is the preserved insect that Chopping used as reference.

The artist later said his 007 work became a bore.

He went as far as to say he hated the books: “There is enough violence in the world without making it glamorous.”

In his later years, Chopping felt financially swindled by his association with Bond. Fleming’s creation became a popular comic strip hero in the Daily Express. Then Sean Connery’s turn as 007 launched the iconic film series.

Fleming acknowledged Chopping’s jackets were a tremendous success during his lifetime (Image: Richard Chopping)

All this imagery was born from the same sophistication found in Fleming’s writing.

However, Chopping was the first. The artist died aged 91 in 2008. Fleming first editions now demand astronomical prices, boosted by the Chopping cover art.

In 1981, when the Fleming estate launched a series of Bond novels by John Gardner, they turned to Chopping to add authenticity. He devised the first of these, Licence Renewed.

Richard Chopping’s work has even featured on Royal Mail stamps. This latest exhibition reveals a talented artist whose work should perhaps be as well known as the
fictional spy he helped make famous.

● Richard Chopping: The Original Bond Artist, at Salisbury Museum until October 3.

Matthew Field and Ajay Chowdhury are the authors of Some Kind Of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond Films published by The History Press.


Relationships [ edit | edit source ]

Daisy [ edit | edit source ]

Daisy is the wife of Onslow. Whenever his wife attempts to seduce him, he often responds with excuses ("I've got a headache.") or will ask her to make him food ("Any more bacon?"). Despite their lack of intimacy, the couple do appear significantly closer than the long-suffering Richard and the domineering Hyacinth.

Hyacinth [ edit | edit source ]

When Hyacinth is on one of her many missions to impress upper-class people or neighbours, it is always Onslow (with either Daisy, Rose, or "Daddy" or all of them at the same time "Daddy" is a rarity, and Daisy and Rose are more common) who turn up in a clapped-out Ford Cortina that backfires loudly every time it starts or stops, embarrassing Hyacinth, crushing her hopes of creating that perfect impression. Not surprisingly therefore, Hyacinth both fears and detests Onslow despite the fact he's a gentle, friendly character and gets on well with everyone else.

Richard [ edit | edit source ]

Onslow has a particularly strong rapport with Hyacinth's long-suffering husband, Richard (he usually calls him "Dickie"), and on one occasion rescues Richard from the demands of life with Hyacinth, taking him to a nearby pub. Onslow sympathises with his brother-in-law as he has a good idea how difficult life must be living with the protagonist.


How Did ɽick' Become Short for 'Richard'?

Dick, dick, dick. Few, if any, other words in the English language have the privilege of common usage as a name, a synonym for penis, and a great way of describing a jerk. So, how the hell did that happen? And more specifically, how did "Dick" become short for the name Richard? A recent video from the folks at Today I Found Out helps explain how dick rose to such prominence.

Turns out, calling someone Dick instead of Richard is a somewhat recent evolution of the nicknames Rich and Rick, both of which we also use instead of Richard to this day. As the video's host explains, it's sort of like one of those "knee bone connected to the thy bone" progressions. In the days of writing everything by hand, Rich and Rick emerged as common nicknames for Richard, and apparently, people also used to like to come up with nicknames that rhyme. This gave rise to nicknames like Dick and Hick around the early Thirteenth Century, but unlike Hick, Dick continues to stick around today.

Of course, Dick isn't the only nickname to emerge from a similar rhyme-based progression. For example, have you ever wondered by people named Robert are often called Bob? Here are a few examples, per the video:

Richard -> Rich -> Dick
Robert -> Rob -> Bob
William -> Will -> Bill

Mind blown yet? Be sure to watch the video for the full Dick story.

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James Bond secrets uncovered: How 007 gave Russia With Love artist perfect murder alibi

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Now, after 60 years, his treasure trove of 007 sketches and paintings has gone on display for the first time. Currently housed at the Salisbury Museum, the hoard has been catalogued by Chopping&rsquos executor, heir and biographer, Jon Lys Turner. He said: &ldquoIn the 50s &lsquoDickie&rsquo Chopping could often be found wreaking havoc on the streets of London&rsquos Soho, along with his best friend and fellow artist, Francis Bacon.&rdquo And it was Bacon who introduced Chopping to debonair Fleming, via his wife Ann.

Related articles

007&rsquos creator was a keen book collector and, as such, was heavily involved with the jacket designs for his thrillers.

The artist painted from his home studio in Wivenhoe, Essex, that he shared with his partner, the painter Denis Wirth-Miller.

Chopping combined danger with nature to bring James Bond&rsquos incredible world to life.

For each successive Bond book, Chopping gave his paintings a grisly twist, all captured by his preferred artistic style, trompe l&rsquooeil &ndash trick of the eye.

The story behind Chopping&rsquos first 007 commission, 1957&rsquos From Russia With Love, was very much in the vein of a Fleming thriller.

The book was said to be in US President John F Kennedy&rsquos top 10 favourites. The story was serialised in the Daily Express, first in an abridged, multi-part form and then as a comic strip.

Artist Richard Chopping painted the covers of nine of Ian Fleming's James Bond bestsellers (Image: NC)

Initially, the gun on Chopping&rsquos cover was to have been a .25 Beretta. However, when this weapon proved difficult to source, Fleming borrowed a gun from his own contact, Major Geoffrey Boothroyd, who later became the inspiration for gadget master Q.

While the firearm was in Chopping&rsquos possession, a murder took place in Glasgow using the same type of gun. Luckily, James Bond proved a unique alibi.

The cover for Goldfinger also had a sinister history.

The ominous image featured a human skull with two gold coins placed in the eye sockets and a rose balanced in its mouth.

Chopping painted from real life and the cranium had been sourced from a local doctor. Chopping later found out the skull was from a female Malaysian victim of genocide. Chopping&rsquos eye-catching work was one of the reasons why Bond&rsquos success snowballed.

It made him the highest-paid jacket designer in the world.

Fleming loved the distinctive trompe l&rsquooeil style and dubbed Chopping, &ldquothe only English master of the art&hellipwho really paints things so you can pick them straight off the canvas&rdquo.

Bond author Ian Fleming passed away in 1964 (Image: Express Newspapers)

But the relationship between author and artist became strained.

Chopping was irritated by Fleming&rsquos public claims to have devised the compositions himself while the writer became frustrated that the artist would not sell him the copyright. Fleming would often find himself making excuses to his publisher for Chopping&rsquos late delivery.

Turner explained: &ldquoIf Chopping had a criticism of Fleming it was that he found him over enthusiastic and threw ideas left right and centre, asking for everything in the picture including the kitchen sink.&rdquo

For Fleming&rsquos Japanese-set adventure, You Only Live Twice, Chopping painted a toad pawing a dragonfly.

After wading through the Essex marshes in vain, he finally sourced his amphibian from a friend&rsquos daughter who sneaked it out of the school science lab. Stored in a bell jar, the toad started puffing up.

Chopping thought it was going to die so he released it, allowing it to leap freely around his studio.

Richard Chopping combined danger with nature to bring James Bond's incredible world to life (Image: Richard Chopping)

Fleming passed away in 1964. During his lifetime, he acknowledged Chopping&rsquos jackets were a tremendous success, both in Britain and America.

They had become something of a &ldquohallmark with the book trade and have earned prizes&rdquo.

Chopping&rsquos final two Fleming designs were for The Man With The Golden Gun and Octopussy, published after Fleming&rsquos death. Both feature what became the artist&rsquos signature: the image of a fly.

Displayed in the exhibition, pinned to a piece of cork, is the preserved insect that Chopping used as reference.

The artist later said his 007 work became a bore.

He went as far as to say he hated the books: &ldquoThere is enough violence in the world without making it glamorous.&rdquo

In his later years, Chopping felt financially swindled by his association with Bond. Fleming&rsquos creation became a popular comic strip hero in the Daily Express. Then Sean Connery&rsquos turn as 007 launched the iconic film series.

Fleming acknowledged Chopping's jackets were a tremendous success during his lifetime (Image: Richard Chopping)

All this imagery was born from the same sophistication found in Fleming&rsquos writing.

However, Chopping was the first. The artist died aged 91 in 2008. Fleming first editions now demand astronomical prices, boosted by the Chopping cover art.

In 1981, when the Fleming estate launched a series of Bond novels by John Gardner, they turned to Chopping to add authenticity. He devised the first of these, Licence Renewed.

Richard Chopping&rsquos work has even featured on Royal Mail stamps. This latest exhibition reveals a talented artist whose work should perhaps be as well known as the
fictional spy he helped make famous.

● Richard Chopping: The Original Bond Artist, at Salisbury Museum until October 3.

Matthew Field and Ajay Chowdhury are the authors of Some Kind Of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond Films published by The History Press.


Watch the video: The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 (July 2022).


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