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This Day In History: 11/22/1963 - Kennedy Assassinated

This Day In History: 11/22/1963 - Kennedy Assassinated


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See what happened in history on November 22 by watching the video of This Day in History. On November 22, 1906, Morse Code was accepted as the universal S.O.S. signal for ships in distress. On November 22, 1986, Mike Tyson made history. Tyson became the youngest person ever to win the World Heavyweight Championship in boxing. He knocked out his opponent in the second round. On November 22, 1988, the B-2 Stealth Bomber was unveiled, and it made its combat debut in Kosovo eleven years later. Most importantly, on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. He was shot twice, and an hour after his death Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested for the crime. This event left the nation in mourning.


John F. Kennedy

Why Famous: The youngest-ever person elected President at age 43, Kennedy assumed office at the height of the Cold War. As such his time in office was spent managing relations with the communist states.

In 1961 Kennedy approved the failed Bay of Pigs invasion in an attempt to overthrow the communist-aligned regime of Fidel Castro. A year later the discovery of Soviet nuclear weapons in Cuba caused the Cuban Missile Crisis, which was eventually resolved peacefully.

In other affairs Kennedy sent advisers to Vietnam and launched America into the Space Race with his famous "we choose to go to the Moon" speech in 1963. While he supported the Civil Rights Movement he was not successful in getting many of his New Frontier policies passed by Congress.

On November 22, 1963, he was assassinated in Dallas, Texas by Lee Harvey Oswald, and was succeeded by Lyndon B. Johnson.

Born: May 29, 1917
Birthplace: Brookline, Massachusetts, USA

Generation: Greatest Generation
Chinese Zodiac: Snake
Star Sign: Gemini

Died: November 22, 1963 (aged 46)
Cause of Death: Assassination


Ask people what mystery they would most like to solve and you’re likely to get a wide range of answers. However, if you ask more than a few, solving the assassination of President John F. Kennedy is likely to be included on the list.

Why? Because for many, some key facets behind the JFK assassination remain largely unsolved. For example, was there a second gunman? Did Lee Harvey Oswald pull the trigger? Was there a shooter behind the ‘Grassy Knoll’ fence? Was Russia, the CIA, the Mafia, the Military-Industrial Complex or Fidel Castro involved? Why was alleged JFK assassin Lee Harvey Oswald killed by Mob afffiliate Jack Ruby before Oswald could fully talk? The list of never fully answered questions is long, indeed.

As one would expect, many approaches to solving this mystery have been considered. Of them all, there is one approach that is unlikely to provide answers. There is also one that is considerably more likely to provide answers. Let’s look a both.

Time Travel
While time travel is not considered a deus ex machina method to solving seemingly intractable dilemmas, it shares some similarity with that ancient Greek approach of bringing in a hitherto-unknown force to provide a tidy ending. Unlike deus ex machina, which injects a most unlikely story resolution late in the story, time travel usually involves the necessary suspension of reality earlier on, in order to utilize unrealistic options that are not otherwise available.

This is not to belittle time travel. Time travel is a terrific format for entertainment, as witnessed by some outstanding films like ‘Somewhere in Time.’ So for escapist entertainment, if one suspends disbelief, time travel can be uniquely exciting. Yet if we’re intent on moving a step closer to actually solving the mystery of an event like the assassination of our 35th president, there is another option, which to many is far more exciting.

New Evidence
The use of new evidence is an approach that could actually advance the resolution of the thorniest problems…including the assassination of President Kennedy. Think of it this way. If a homicide detective truly wishes to solve a murder, time and again it is good detective work, including a hunt for all available new evidence, that is the proven recipe for success. Consider the uncovering of many noteworthy clues since the JFK assassination, like the discovery of never-seen movies taken in Dallas that day on November 22, 1963.

Bottom Line
Curious about how new evidence could help provide answers to the JFK assassination? Click here for information about the novel 11-22-1963: New Evidence.


Solving The JFK Assassination: New Evidence Vs. Time Travel

Ask people what mystery they would most like to solve and you’re likely to get a wide range of answers. However, if you ask more than a few, solving the assassination of President John F. Kennedy is likely to be included on the list.

Why? Because for many, some key facets behind the JFK assassination remain largely unsolved. For example, was there a second gunman? Did Lee Harvey Oswald pull the trigger? Was there a shooter behind the ‘Grassy Knoll’ fence? Was Russia, the CIA, the Mafia, the Military-Industrial Complex or Fidel Castro involved? Why was alleged JFK assassin Lee Harvey Oswald killed by Mob afffiliate Jack Ruby before Oswald could fully talk? The list of never fully answered questions is long, indeed.

As one would expect, many approaches to solving this mystery have been considered. Of them all, there is one approach that is unlikely to provide answers. There is also one that is considerably more likely to provide answers. Let’s look a both.

Time Travel
While time travel is not considered a deus ex machina method to solving seemingly intractable dilemmas, it shares some similarity with that ancient Greek approach of bringing in a hitherto-unknown force to provide a tidy ending. Unlike deus ex machina, which injects a most unlikely story resolution late in the story, time travel usually involves the necessary suspension of reality earlier on, in order to utilize unrealistic options that are not otherwise available.

This is not to belittle time travel. Time travel is a terrific format for entertainment, as witnessed by some outstanding films like ‘Somewhere in Time.’ So for escapist entertainment, if one suspends disbelief, time travel can be uniquely exciting. Yet if we’re intent on moving a step closer to actually solving the mystery of an event like the assassination of our 35th president, there is another option, which to many is far more exciting.

New Evidence
The use of new evidence is an approach that could actually advance the resolution of the thorniest problems…including the assassination of President Kennedy. Think of it this way. If a homicide detective truly wishes to solve a murder, time and again it is good detective work, including a hunt for all available new evidence, that is the proven recipe for success. Consider the uncovering of many noteworthy clues since the JFK assassination, like the discovery of never-seen movies taken in Dallas that day on November 22, 1963.

Bottom Line
Curious about how new evidence could help provide answers to the JFK assassination? Click here for information about the novel 11-22-1963: New Evidence.


This day in history, November 22: President John F. Kennedy shot to death in Dallas

Today is Sunday, Nov. 22, the 327th day of 2020. There are 39 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 22, 1963, John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was shot to death during a motorcade in Dallas Texas Gov. John B. Connally, riding in the same car as Kennedy, was seriously wounded suspected gunman Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested. Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as president.

In 1935, a flying boat, the China Clipper, took off from Alameda, California, carrying more than 100,000 pieces of mail on the first trans-Pacific airmail flight.

In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek (chang ky-shehk) met in Cairo to discuss measures for defeating Japan. Lyricist Lorenz Hart died in New York at age 48.

In 1961, Frank Robinson of the Cincinnati Reds was named Most Valuable Player of the National League.

In 1965, the musical “Man of La Mancha” opened on Broadway.

In 1967, the U.N. Security Council approved Resolution 242, which called for Israel to withdraw from territories it had captured the previous June, and implicitly called on adversaries to recognize Israel’s right to exist.

In 1977, regular passenger service between New York and Europe on the supersonic Concorde began on a trial basis.

In 1980, death claimed film star Mae West at her Hollywood residence at age 87 and former House Speaker John W. McCormack in Dedham, Mass. at age 88.

In 1990, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, having failed to win re-election of the Conservative Party leadership on the first ballot, announced she would resign.

In 1995, acting swiftly to boost the Balkan peace accord, the U-N Security Council suspended economic sanctions against Serbia and eased the arms embargo against the states of the former Yugoslavia.

In 2003, thousands of mourners gathered in downtown Dallas along the street where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated 40 years earlier.

In 2005, Angela Merkel (AHN’-geh-lah MEHR’-kuhl) took power as Germany’s first female chancellor. Ted Koppel hosted his final edition of ABC News’ “Nightline.”

In 2014, A 12-year-old Black boy, Tamir (tuh-MEER’) Rice, was shot and mortally wounded by police outside a Cleveland recreation center after brandishing what turned out to be a pellet gun. (A grand jury declined to indict either the patrolman who fired the fatal shot or a training officer.)

Ten years ago: Thousands of people stampeded during a festival in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh, leaving some 350 dead and hundreds injured in what the prime minister called the country’s biggest tragedy since the 1970s reign of terror by the Khmer Rouge. Cincinnati Reds first baseman Joey Votto was overwhelmingly elected the National League’s Most Valuable Player.


1963: U.S President John F. Kennedy assassinated on this day in history

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas, in an open-top convertible.

On this 22nd day of November in 1963, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas, in an open-top convertible.

First lady Jacqueline Kennedy rarely accompanied her husband on political outings, but she was beside him, along with Texas Governor John Connally and his wife, for a 10-mile motorcade through the streets of downtown Dallas on November 22.

Sitting in a Lincoln convertible, the Kennedys and Connallys waved at the large and enthusiastic crowds gathered along the parade route.

As their vehicle passed the Texas School Book Depository Building at 12:30 p.m., Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired three shots from the sixth floor, fatally wounding President Kennedy and seriously injuring Governor Connally. Kennedy was pronounced dead 30 minutes later at Dallas’ Parkland Hospital. He was 46.

Vice President Lyndon Johnson, who was three cars behind President Kennedy in the motorcade, was sworn in as the 36th president of the United States at 2:39 p.m. He took the presidential oath of office aboard Air Force One as it sat on the runway at Dallas Love Field airport. The swearing in was witnessed by some 30 people, including Jacqueline Kennedy, who was still wearing clothes stained with her husband’s blood. Seven minutes later, the presidential jet took off for Washington.

The next day, November 23, President Johnson issued his first proclamation, declaring November 25 to be a day of national mourning for the slain president. On that Monday, hundreds of thousands of people lined the streets of Washington to watch a horse-drawn caisson bear Kennedy’s body from the Capitol Rotunda to St. Matthew’s Catholic Cathedral for a requiem Mass.

The solemn procession then continued on to Arlington National Cemetery, where leaders of 99 nations gathered for the state funeral. Kennedy was buried with full military honors on a slope below Arlington House, where an eternal flame was lit by his widow to forever mark the grave.

Lee Harvey Oswald, born in New Orleans in 1939, joined the U.S. Marines in 1956. He was discharged in 1959 and nine days later left for the Soviet Union, where he tried unsuccessfully to become a citizen. He worked in Minsk and married a Soviet woman and in 1962 was allowed to return to the United States with his wife and infant daughter. In early 1963, he bought a .38 revolver and rifle with a telescopic sight by mail order, and on April 10 in Dallas he allegedly shot at and missed former U.S. Army general Edwin Walker, a figure known for his extreme right-wing views.

Later that month, Oswald went to New Orleans and founded a branch of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, a pro-Castro organization. In September 1963, he went to Mexico City, where investigators allege that he attempted to secure a visa to travel to Cuba or return to the USSR. In October, he returned to Dallas and took a job at the Texas School Book Depository Building.

Less than an hour after Kennedy was shot, Oswald killed a policeman who questioned him on the street near his rooming house in Dallas. Thirty minutes later, Oswald was arrested in a movie theater by police responding to reports of a suspect. He was formally arraigned on November 23 for the murders of President Kennedy and Officer J.D. Tippit.

On November 24, Oswald was brought to the basement of the Dallas police headquarters on his way to a more secure county jail. A crowd of police and press with live television cameras rolling gathered to witness his departure.

As Oswald came into the room, Jack Ruby emerged from the crowd and fatally wounded him with a single shot from a concealed .38 revolver. Ruby, who was immediately detained, claimed that rage at Kennedy’s murder was the motive for his action. Some called him a hero, but he was nonetheless charged with first-degree murder.

Jack Ruby, originally known as Jacob Rubenstein, operated strip joints and dance halls in Dallas and had minor connections to organized crime. He features prominently in Kennedy-assassination theories, and many believe he killed Oswald to keep him from revealing a larger conspiracy.

In his trial, Ruby denied the allegation and pleaded innocent on the grounds that his great grief over Kennedy’s murder had caused him to suffer “psychomotor epilepsy” and shoot Oswald unconsciously. The jury found Ruby guilty of “murder with malice” and sentenced him to die.

In October 1966, the Texas Court of Appeals reversed the decision on the grounds of improper admission of testimony and the fact that Ruby could not have received a fair trial in Dallas at the time. In January 1967, while awaiting a new trial, to be held in Wichita Falls, Ruby died of lung cancer in a Dallas hospital.

The official Warren Commission report of 1964 concluded that neither Oswald nor Ruby were part of a larger conspiracy, either domestic or international, to assassinate President Kennedy.

Buy on Amazon.com – Pointing the finger at Lyndon Johnson, the CIA, and the Mafia, John joins Jackie and Bobby Kennedy in their conclusion that the assassination of JFK was far more complex than a deranged attack by Lee Harvey Oswald, the 24-year-old ex-Marine.

Despite its seemingly firm conclusions, the report failed to silence conspiracy theories surrounding the event, and in 1978 the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded in a preliminary report that Kennedy was “probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy” that may have involved multiple shooters and organized crime. The committee’s findings, as with those of the Warren Commission, continue to be widely disputed.


11-22-1963: New Evidence

Many people know President John F. Kennedy is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, where an eternal flame burns day and night in his honor. Less known is the fact that President Kennedy was exhumed from his original burial site in 1967 and reburied. So why was this done? The president’s body was moved to better accommodate the large number of visitors to his gravesite.

Timeline
President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963 and buried on November 25th in Arlington Cemetery. More than three years later on March 14, 1967, President Kennedy’s body was moved to another location within the same cemetery. Also transferred with the president’s remains were those of his deceased infant children, Arabella (sometimes referred to as his unnamed daughter) and son, Patrick.

A crane was used to move the president’s vault-enclosed casket, which remained secured throughout the process and was never opened. The eternal flame was also moved. You can read more about the original design of that unique engineering feat here.

Consecrating the president’s gravesite on March 15th in a driving rain was Roman Catholic Cardinal Richard Cushing. In attendance were President Kennedy’s family members, including his brothers Edward and Robert, plus Mrs. Kennedy and President Johnson.

The Eternal Flame at President Kennedy’s Gravesite

Another little-known fact involves the original casket that carried President Kennedy from Dallas back to Washington, DC. That original casket was dropped to the bottom of the ocean in 1966. Most people are unfamiliar with facts surrounding this event. You can read even more about that interesting story here.


Unseen Home Movies Surface

11-22-1963: New Evidence shows how such new evidence could still break the Kennedy assassination wide open. As a result of the many cameras in Dallas surrounding President Kennedy’s visit, it’s hardly surprising that newly discovered photos and movies relevant to the investigation continue to turn up. Here are examples of once ‘lost’ films of President Kennedy’s final hours in Dallas and the aftermath:

Click above image to order this book


This Day in History: Nov 22, 1963: John F. Kennedy assassinated

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas, in an open-top convertible.

First lady Jacqueline Kennedy rarely accompanied her husband on political outings, but she was beside him, along with Texas Governor John Connally and his wife, for a 10-mile motorcade through the streets of downtown Dallas on November 22. Sitting in a Lincoln convertible, the Kennedys and Connallys waved at the large and enthusiastic crowds gathered along the parade route. As their vehicle passed the Texas School Book Depository Building at 12:30 p.m., Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired three shots from the sixth floor, fatally wounding President Kennedy and seriously injuring Governor Connally. Kennedy was pronounced dead 30 minutes later at Dallas' Parkland Hospital. He was 46.

Vice President Lyndon Johnson, who was three cars behind President Kennedy in the motorcade, was sworn in as the 36th president of the United States at 2:39 p.m. He took the presidential oath of office aboard Air Force One as it sat on the runway at Dallas Love Field airport. The swearing in was witnessed by some 30 people, including Jacqueline Kennedy, who was still wearing clothes stained with her husband's blood. Seven minutes later, the presidential jet took off for Washington.

The next day, November 23, President Johnson issued his first proclamation, declaring November 25 to be a day of national mourning for the slain president. On that Monday, hundreds of thousands of people lined the streets of Washington to watch a horse-drawn caisson bear Kennedy's body from the Capitol Rotunda to St. Matthew's Catholic Cathedral for a requiem Mass. The solemn procession then continued on to Arlington National Cemetery, where leaders of 99 nations gathered for the state funeral. Kennedy was buried with full military honors on a slope below Arlington House, where an eternal flame was lit by his widow to forever mark the grave.

Lee Harvey Oswald, born in New Orleans in 1939, joined the U.S. Marines in 1956. He was discharged in 1959 and nine days later left for the Soviet Union, where he tried unsuccessfully to become a citizen. He worked in Minsk and married a Soviet woman and in 1962 was allowed to return to the United States with his wife and infant daughter. In early 1963, he bought a .38 revolver and rifle with a telescopic sight by mail order, and on April 10 in Dallas he allegedly shot at and missed former U.S. Army general Edwin Walker, a figure known for his extreme right-wing views. Later that month, Oswald went to New Orleans and founded a branch of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, a pro-Castro organization. In September 1963, he went to Mexico City, where investigators allege that he attempted to secure a visa to travel to Cuba or return to the USSR. In October, he returned to Dallas and took a job at the Texas School Book Depository Building.

Less than an hour after Kennedy was shot, Oswald killed a policeman who questioned him on the street near his rooming house in Dallas. Thirty minutes later, Oswald was arrested in a movie theater by police responding to reports of a suspect. He was formally arraigned on November 23 for the murders of President Kennedy and Officer J.D. Tippit.

On November 24, Oswald was brought to the basement of the Dallas police headquarters on his way to a more secure county jail. A crowd of police and press with live television cameras rolling gathered to witness his departure. As Oswald came into the room, Jack Ruby emerged from the crowd and fatally wounded him with a single shot from a concealed .38 revolver. Ruby, who was immediately detained, claimed that rage at Kennedy's murder was the motive for his action. Some called him a hero, but he was nonetheless charged with first-degree murder.

Jack Ruby, originally known as Jacob Rubenstein, operated strip joints and dance halls in Dallas and had minor connections to organized crime. He features prominently in Kennedy-assassination theories, and many believe he killed Oswald to keep him from revealing a larger conspiracy. In his trial, Ruby denied the allegation and pleaded innocent on the grounds that his great grief over Kennedy's murder had caused him to suffer "psychomotor epilepsy" and shoot Oswald unconsciously. The jury found Ruby guilty of "murder with malice" and sentenced him to die.

In October 1966, the Texas Court of Appeals reversed the decision on the grounds of improper admission of testimony and the fact that Ruby could not have received a fair trial in Dallas at the time. In January 1967, while awaiting a new trial, to be held in Wichita Falls, Ruby died of lung cancer in a Dallas hospital.


The official Warren Commission report of 1964 concluded that neither Oswald nor Ruby were part of a larger conspiracy, either domestic or international, to assassinate President Kennedy. Despite its seemingly firm conclusions, the report failed to silence conspiracy theories surrounding the event, and in 1978 the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded in a preliminary report that Kennedy was "probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy" that may have involved multiple shooters and organized crime. The committee's findings, as with those of the Warren Commission, continue to be widely disputed.


On this day in history November 22, 1963, President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas Texas launching four days of national mourning

On this day in history… November 22, 1963, John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United S t ates (1961–63) was assassinated at 12:30 p.m. by Lee Harvey Oswald, while in a Presidential motorcade in Dealey Plaza, Dallas, Texas heading towards the Texas School Book Depository. Kennedy was in an open limousine waving at the cheering crowd with First Lady Jackie Kennedy, and Texas Governor John Connally and his wife Nelly when three shots in succession erupted, which hit the President, and the Governor. Governor Connally was hit just once, while President Kennedy was hit twice, fatally. The motorcade rushed to Parkland Hospital, where President Kennedy was pronounced dead at 46 years-old, 30 minutes after the shooting. For three days after the shooting, the nation mourned the loss of their young president culminating in a state funeral on November 25.

President Kennedy’s visit to Texas was part of his early re-election campaign strategy, where he hoped in 1964 to win Florida and Texas. Although the president had not formally announced his re-election, he already started touring states. In Texas, Kennedy was looking to bring squabbling factions of the state’s Democratic Party together. President Kennedy and First Lady Jackie left Washington on Thursday, Nov. 21, where they would go on a “two-day, five-city tour of Texas.”

On that fateful day, Friday, Nov. 22, the Kennedys started out in Fort Worth that rainy morning, before taking a thirteen-minute flight to Dallas. Arriving at Love Field, the Kennedys were greeted by the public, with someone handing Jackie a bouquet of red roses. In Dallas, the rain stopped, and the Kennedys joined the Texas first couple the Connallys in a now open top, convertible. They had to travel only ten miles to reach their destination, the Trade Mart Kennedy was supposed to address a “luncheon.”

They never reached there. On route, Kennedy and Connally were both shot, but the president more seriously, with wounds in his head and neck, he “slumped over” into Jackie’s lap, and where she shielded him as the motorcade now sped to Parkland Memorial Hospital. There was little that could be done to save the president, and he received last rites before being announced dead at 1 p.m., a mere half hour after he was shot. In the book “The Kennedy Detail” Secret Service agent Clint Hill recalled, “It has taken me decades to learn to cope with the guilt and sense of responsibility for the president’s death, and I have made it a practice to keep my memories to myself. I don’t talk to anybody about that day.

President Kenney would return to Love Field where barely three hours before he arrived alive, leaving in a casket boarding Air Force One. Inside the “crowded” plane US District Court Judge Sarah Hughes swore in Vice-President Lyndon Baines Johnson as the 36th US president at 2:38 p.m. Jackie Kennedy was standing by Johnson’s side, still wearing the clothes stained with the president’s blood.

CBS News was the first to report Kennedy had been shot at 12:40 p.m. CT as the network cut into popular soap opera “As the World Turns” to report what had happened to the president. Anchor Walter Cronkite went live at 12:48 p.m. Cronkite announced the president’s death as he took off his glasses and wiped the tears from his eyes. There was an immediate outpouring of grief by the nation after news of the assassination broke, as they mourned the loss of an idealized young President. Robert Thompson, “a professor of pop culture and television at Syracuse University” commented, “While we didn’t see the assassination live, the television show about the assassination was a four-day long drama that played on national television.”

Police arrested Oswald, an hour after the shots were fired. Oswald, a Soviet sympathizer with ties to the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, had shot Kennedy from the school book depository building, where he recently began to work. Two days later, Jack Ruby, a Dallas nightclub owner fatally shot Oswald, as he was being transferred from Dallas Police Headquarters to the Dallas County Jail Ruby claimed he wanted to spare Jackie Kennedy any further grief.

The nation proceeded into four days of mourning, culminating three days later on November 25, 1963, when a state funeral was held for the slain president. According to the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library Jackie Kennedy modeled the funeral after President Abraham Lincoln’s, Lincoln had been assassinated nearly a 100 years before. On Saturday, November 23, as Kennedy’s body was in repose in the East Room of the White House for 24 hours, President Johnson declared the day a national day of mourning. On Sunday, November 24, the President’s coffin was carried by the same horse-drawn carriage as President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the Unknown Soldier before him, to the Capitol building where his body laid in state for 21 hours, with 250,000 people visiting his casket in the Capitol’s Rotunda.

On that Monday, November 25, one million people gathered on the route of the processional from the Capitol to St. Matthew’s Cathedral, where the funeral was held. Foreign dignitaries from 100 countries, including 19 heads of state came to pay their respects, and millions of Americans and 23 countries watched the assassination coverage and then funeral on TV, which was covered by then three big networks ABC, CBS, and NBC. John B. Mayo in his 1967 book “Bulletin From Dallas: The President Is From Dead” determined that “CBS clocked in with 55 total hours, ABC played 60 hours and NBC — airing an all-night vigil from the Capitol Rotunda on Sunday — broadcast 71 hours of coverage that weekend.”

After the Requiem Mass, as the President’s body was carried from the cathedral, three-year-old John Jr. saluted his father’s casket giving the mourning nation an iconic image to remember. Kennedy was buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia after the service Jackie Kennedy and the president’s brothers Robert and Edward lit an eternal flame that remains burning over the President’s gravesite.

In 2010, historian Ellen Fitzpatrick published her book “Letters to Jackie: Condolences from a Grieving Nation.” Speaking to PBS’s Newshour about the purpose of the book and looking back at the memory of President Kennedy, she claimed “And what I was trying to get at was how Americans at the moment viewed John F. Kennedy. It seemed to me that, in the decades since his death, there’s been so much historical revisionism, much of it appropriate, that dismantled the hagiography that grew up around him in the immediate aftermath of his assassination.”

Continuing, Fitzpatrick explained, “It had become increasingly difficult for students, for younger people, even people of my own generation, to recover that moment, the kind of idealism and faith that people had and the way that President Kennedy was viewed in his time… So, I was thinking, how can I recapture this? And I went into the archives. I asked the archivist. I remembered the condolence letters. I remembered Mrs. Kennedy thanking the public.”

Historian Alan Brinkley eloquently honored Kennedy on the 50th anniversary of his death in 2013, with an article in the Atlantic Magazine, simply titled the “Legacy of John Kennedy” doing just that looking at the mystique of the 35th president that has only grown with time. Brinkley explains the reason why Kennedy remains a legend despite many failed policies and the introduction of far sweeping laws that passed during his successor’s administration. Brinkley writes Kennedy “remains a powerful symbol of a lost moment, of a soaring idealism and hopefulness that subsequent generations still try to recover. His allure-the romantic, almost mystic, associations his name evokes-not only survives but flourishes.”

After the most bruising and ugly presidential election in perhaps American history, the image Kennedy invoked is a sharp contrast to the political reality of today making Brinkley’s conclusion even more powerful. Brinkley expressed, Kennedy’s “legacy has only grown in the 50 years since his death. That he still embodies a rare moment of public activism explains much of his continuing appeal: He reminds many Americans of an age when it was possible to believe that politics could speak to society’s moral yearnings and be harnessed to its highest aspirations. More than anything, perhaps, Kennedy reminds us of a time when the nation’s capacities looked limitless, when its future seemed unbounded, when Americans believed that they could solve hard problems and accomplish bold deeds.” Whether Democrat or Republican it impossible in the era of Donald Trump not to wish for the idealism of the Kennedy era and ponder what if…