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William Balmer

William Balmer

William Balmer was born in Liverpool in 1877. He played local football for Aintree Church and South Shore before joining Everton. He made his Football League debut against West Bromwich Albion in November 1897.

According to Tony Matthews, the author of Who's Who of Everton, Balmer was "a thickset defender" with a "crunching tackle". He played for the club at both full-back positions.

Everton was a very good side and did well in the First Division of the Football League finishing 4th (1897-98), 4th (1898-99), 7th (1900-01), 2nd (1901-02), 3rd (1903-04) and 2nd (1904-05).

Balmer won his first and only international cap for England against Ireland on 25th February 1905. The England team that day also included Steve Bloomer, Richard Bond, Alex Leake, Charlie Roberts, Sam Wolstenholme and Vivian Woodward.

Everton had a good cup run in the 1905-1906 season beating Chesterfield Town (3-0), Bradford City (1-0), Sheffield Wednesday (4-3) and Liverpool (2-0). Everton beat Newcastle United 1-0 in the FA Cup Final played at Crystal Palace. Balmer won a winner's medal but was on the losing side against Sheffield Wednesday the following season in the 1907 final.

Balmer left Everton in 1908. During his time at the club he scored one goal (a penalty against Nottingham Forest) in 331 games. Balmer was a coach at Huddersfield Town between 1919-21.

William Balmer died in 1937.


Billy and Bob: The Fabulous Balmer Brothers

William and Robert Balmer formed a fearsome, and fruitful, fraternal partnership in Everton’s back-line in the early years of the 20th Century. William’s selection for national team duty would also make him the club’s first Scouse England cap.

They were the sons of James (a carpenter and joiner) and Martha. William Atherton was born on 29 July 1875 whilst Robert followed on 28 November 1881. The pair – better known and Billy and Bob – grew-up alongside their siblings John (b. 1874) and Mary (b. 1877) at the family home at 14 Crosby Green, West Derby. The boys trained as joiners but also embarked on football careers.

Letter to John and Bill Balmer in 1896 from Everton FC (Thanks to Brendan Connolly Collection)

For Billy the road to Goodison would not be a direct one. After playing youth football in the Aintree Church team, he would ply his footballing trade at full-back for a season, across the Ribble estuary, with South Shore (the Lancashire League outfit which went on to merge with Blackpool FC). Everton’s committee signed Billy on 20 March 1896 on wages of 20/ per week. He was joined by his elder sibling, John, who played in the forward line. The earliest record of the boys playing together was for Everton reserves at Glossop North End on 9 March 1896.

John dropped off the Everton radar fairly quickly (he preferred running to football) and concentrated on working in the family joinery business. Billy, however, was retained and debuted for the senior team on 6 Nov 1897, a 2-2 draw at West Bromwich Albion. It was reported that ‘…the work of Muir, Barker and Balmer was thoroughly sound. The last named player improved considerably as the game went on.’ In his second start he drew great praise: ‘None the less brilliant were Muir, Storrier, and Balmer, who coped with the occasional heavy rushes of the home forwards with great coolness and dexterity, and in addition their kicking was always clean and effective. In Balmer the club has an understudy of exceptional merit. For a second acquaintance with League Football, the young player came out of the ordeal with flying colours, and there should be no misgiving in future should a vacancy arise in the back division’

Within two months of the start of the following season, Billy was the first-choice at right-back – a position he held down for a decade. In time he was joined in the Everton ranks by Bob – who would work his way up from the Lancashire Combination League team. As a youth, Bob played at full-back for Shaw Street College for three years and then participated in local junior football for a further three seasons. He was an amateur terms with Everton from the 1900/01 season, progressing to professional status. An inch shorter than Billy, and a stone lighter, Bob relied slightly less on brawn, and more on timings, than his older brother. That said, as was the full-back’s remit of the era, both were adept at stopping wingers in their tracks and hoofing the ball downfield. A 1925 Liverpool Echo article described compared and contrasted them, thus:

‘There was a sturdy sureness about the defence of the Brothers Balmer, Billy and Robert, that was both taking to the eye and consoling to those famous followers of the Everton club who took their pleasures each week on the goal stands. Robert, the younger brother, was of a slimmer build than his famous brother, but as he matured and developed in his play there was a finish, and a skilled diplomacy in his style that marked him as a player of resource and enterprise. Billy, on the other hand, always impressed as one of those rugged, stonewall players, who never know fear or funk, and who could be relied on, whatever, calls were made on him to do justice to himself and to his team…Billy Balmer, at the top of his form, was an inspiring player, to watch. He resolution was quick, his methods’ generally fair, his tenacity superb. ‘

Bob would make his bow for the first team at left-back, alongside Billy, on 5 January 1903 when the Blues defeated Middlesbrough 3-0. It was almost a dream start when he went close to scoring following an early corner. The Liverpool Courier commented: ‘The Northerns next attacked, but the brothers Balmer defended strongly, both with regard to kicking and tackling.’

It would be mid-way through the 1904/05 season when Bob broke into the team on a regular basis and worked in harness with his brother to protect Leigh Richmond Roose and/or Bill Scott in the Everton goal. With Tom Booth frequently unavailable through injury, Billy captained the team for the vast majority of matches and was rewarded for his consistency with a call-up for England. It came in a 1-1 draw with Ireland staged at Ayresome Park on 5 February 1905 (he had previously represented the Football League against the Scottish League in 1901). This would be his only ‘cap’ but he had written himself into the history books as the first locally-born Everton player to receive such recognition. The domestic season would end in frustration as two away defeats in the final three matches saw Everton pipped by Newcastle to the title.

Billy Balmer wearing his England cap in 1905 (thanks to Neil Caple Collection)

Another chance to win silverware would come a year later. Having beaten Liverpool in the 1906 FA Cup semi-final, the squad departed from Liverpool in advance of the final to be staged at the Crystal Palace stadium. The Liverpool Courier reported:

The Everton players, or rather the contingent from which the eleven will be chosen, left Liverpool on Tuesday for their training quarters at Chingford, which borders on Epping Forest. They broke their journey at Stafford to enjoy the brine baths there, and according to the latest reports, this experience was most beneficial. The contingent which, was in charge of Mr. B. Kelly, and Mr. E.A. Bainbridge (directors), consisted of: – Scott, W. Balmer, R. Balmer, Crelley, Hill, Booth, Abbott, Makepeace, Chadwick, Sharp, Bolton, Young, Settle, Hardman, and Donnachie. At the Royal Forest Hotel, Chingford, the men have found comfortable quarters. They are staying in a beautiful district, and nothing in the way of arduous training, will be undertaken.

There was much speculation as to who would occupy the two full-back berths with the Balmer brothers challenging fellow Scouser, Jack Crelley for selection. The Courier reported on the build up, which had little to do with football practice:

I have just seen Mr Cuff, the Everton secretary, and learned that the members of the team were all fit and well. They have benefited greatly by their stay at Chingford, which has been more like a rest than a period of special training. Golf on a four-mile course, walking amid beautiful country scenery and occasionally sprinting has been the programme. Not a football has been kicked. The men will take the field fresh as paint, eager for the fray, and confident of victory. The exact constitution of the team will not be decided until the morning, there being just a doubt, so Mr. Cuff informs me, as to which of the Brothers Balmer will partner Crelley at the back. The younger brother, Robert, has so greatly improved that he may possibly fill the position.

Shortly before kick-off it was confirmed that the directors had overlooked Bob in favour of Crelley and his elder brother (who occupied the left-back slot). In the tightly packed 80,000 crowd the Liverpool Echo reporter spotted a former Toffee in Leigh Richmond Roose: ‘Among the early birds was the great Roose, keen and energetic as ever, and who was attached enough to his old club to express his heartiest wish for their success and confident in their ability.’

Billy’s selection was justified as he gave an outstanding defensive performance in a 1-0 victory – Everton’s first cup triumph. The Echo praised him: ‘W. Balmer probably never played a better game than on Saturday. He tackled coolly and kept a good length with his punts. He was a trifle shaky at the close, but on the whole his performance was of a sterling character.’

In spite of being over-looked for the final there was a school of thought that Bob was become a superior player to Billy. In October of that year the Lancashire Evening Post asked: ‘Is Robert Balmer as good a back as his elder and better-known brother? On the few occasions I have seen the former he has impressed me very favourably, remarkably clean with his kicking and perhaps rather safer than William, who is inclined to be risky at times.’ Regardless, the brothers were the preferred full-back pairing in the 1906/07 season and lined up at Crystal Palace when Everton sought to retain the FA Cup against Sheffield Wednesday. In the event the Yorkshiremen ran out 2-1 winners and neither Balmer enjoyed a good afternoon. Athletic News reported:

‘The Balmers were fairly serviceable, but I do not think they constituted a strong pair, and they were just about on a level with the Wednesday backs. William Balmer is not quite well, and extenuating circumstances can be urged on his behalf, as he has a knee. His brother, Robert Balmer, was possibly the better of the two.’

After a further season in tandem in the back line, the siblings played their 65th and final match together in a FA Cup defeat to Southampton on 11 March 1908. At the conclusion of the season Billy’s first team career with Everton ended on 331 competitive outings (he had scored one goal – a penalty in 1899 – but conceded eight own goals in this time). Although still registered with Everton he was able to play for Croydon Common for whom he would make 3 FA Cup, 43 Southern League appearances over two seasons. By 1911 Billy was back on home turf and working as a newsagent at 20 Mill Lane in West Derby. He subsequently signed for Chester of the Lancashire Combination in 1912 but it was an abortive comeback as, after just two matches, he was deemed to be too immobile for further selection.

Bob, meanwhile, continued to serve the Toffees with distinction. In October 1910 Athletic News commented on his selection for an inter-league match with Ireland: ‘Like his brother, William, the younger Balmer has been one of the most consistent backs that ever donned the Everton colours and in League colours has rendered excellent service.’ That same month he as reported to have kicked-off refereed a game of ‘rink football’ – played on skates at the Tournament Hall. Losing his regular starting berth in the spring of 1911, and struggling with a knee injury, he made his 187th and final, appearance for the Blues in April 1912. He remained registered with Everton as a player – but available for transfer at £300 – until the eve of the (cancelled) 1915/16 season.

In April 1913, club director Dr. Whitford proposed that Bob be offered a non-playing engagementby Everton but the proposal was voted down by fellow board members. Instead, that August, he was signed by W.J. Sawyer for South Liverpool FC. Bob’s former teammate, Alex ‘Sandy’ Young, was already on the books at Dingle Park. Early in 1914 the Liverpool Echo reported on Bob turning out at right-back for his new club, against The Central in Walkden. He was described as ‘simply unbeatable.’ In April 1915 Bob was reunited with the 1906-07 team for a wartime charity match organises by Jack Sharp against a team of boxers. The Echo journalist reported on the match which raised £300: “At full-back Bob Balmer played capitally and showed partially again for keeping the ball in play and for overhead kicks which were specialities with him before he took to running a book. No, that that kind of book but an insurance business in which I wish him all good fortune” (NB some match reports record – probably erroneously – that it was Billy, rather than Bob who played in this match).

On 25 Nov 1916, Bob married Blanche Farley there is no record of them having children. It seems that Bob remained in the Everton hierarchy’s affections for he was given a complimentary season ticket by the club in 1926 – a gesture that was repeated for many years. At the outbreak of war, in 1939, he was living with Blanche at 12 Rosthwaite Road and working as a docker. It was at this address that he passed away in January 1959 at the age of seventy-nine.

As for Billy, he appeared to sever all ties with Everton although he remained a ‘Blue’. He lost his first wife, Alice, in 1916 and remarried Mary Thomas in 1918. By then he was living and working in Huddersfield. By the turn of the 1920s he was doing some coaching at Huddersfield Town. In 1939 Billy was recorded as living at 114 Church Street, Huddersfield. His occupation was noted as “Joiner – incapacitated” whilst Mary was a ‘woollen burler’. He passed away in February 1961 at the age of 85. At the time at he was living at 154 Lowerhouses Lane in Huddersfield. He was cremated on 15 February at All Hallow’s Church, Almondbury.

That is not the end of the Balmer story in Merseyside football circles, however. John Balmer’s son, ‘Jack’ (John) – the nephew of Billy and Bob – played football at centre-forward whilst studying at the Liverpool Collegiate. He recounted to George Harrison for his The Unforgettables series in the Liverpool Echo in 1974 that he was always destined to join Everton:

‘My uncles were Everton stalwarts…I was brought up in the Everton tradition by them and my father. When I was making the grade at 16 as centre-forward for Liverpool Collegiate Old Boys, Everton was obviously the club that came first.’

Jack duly joined the Toffees on amateur forms in 1933, aged 17, and appeared for the reserves on a number of occasions. One such outing saw him paired in attack with Bill “Dixie” Dean who was on the comeback trail after an injury. Jack was excited, but awestruck, to be lining up with his sporting idol. Dean spotted his nervousness and said, ‘Don’t worry son, I’ll lay one on for you just before half-time’ True to his word, ‘Dixie’ headed the ball into Jack’s path five minutes for the break: ‘I couldn’t miss. It made me feel great, getting a goal from my hero.’ he recalled. When Everton sought to sign Jack on professional forms, the talks broke down: ‘I was working as a joiner in my father’s building business and Everton offered me only £5 to be on full time for them. It wasn’t worth it to me…I was still on Everton’s book as an amateur so I saw out the season for them. Meantime Jack Rouse had been along to offer me £8 a week with £6 summer wages for Liverpool. So I signed, much, I should add, to the family shame. Red was not their favourite colour.’

The Derby match – Jack Balmer and Tommy ‘T,G.’ Jones

Having joined Liverpool in September 1935, Jack made his first team debut almost immediately. Often mistaken for a veteran due to premature balding, he carved out a highly-successful career as a clever inside-forward. During the war years he served in the Kings Regiment, teaching soldiers to drive Bren gun carriers and jeeps near Formby and, towards the end of the conflict, he was posted to Germany. He earned a wartime England cap in 1939, playing alongside Everton’s Tommy Lawton. Post-war, paired with Albert Stubbins, he captained Liverpool to the 1946/47 League Championship and scored three consecutive hat-tricks in November 1946. In spite of these credentials and an impressive career strike rate, ain the late 1940s he found himself a target of some Anfield ‘boo-boys’ who took exception to his intelligent, dare I say, Corinthian, approach to the game. These malcontents craved a more harum-scarum style of forward-play with was an anathema to Jack. His game was more subtle: based on skill, creativity and nous. He explained to George Harrison: ‘They were entitled to their opinion. Maybe I didn’t go in for the crunch tackle – it seemed unnecessary to me. Even now, when I go and watch Everton or Liverpool, or see television games, I get a shudder when I see the boot going in. I was never a coward at the game, but that kind of tackling was never my idea of football.’

Jack Balmer in post war action for Everton

Jack hung up his boots in 1953 and, after a period coaching Liverpool’s youth players and scouting, he concentrated on the family building business – enjoying playing golf in his spare time. He passed away, suddenly, on Christmas Day 1984, at the age of 68 following a heart attack. After a funeral service at St Mary’s Church in West Derby, he was cremated at Anfield Crematorium. Concluding his 1974 interview with George Harrison he said: ‘I cannot forget those great years I had at Anfield, even if some of the Kop didn’t go for me all that much. And you know something? I still like Everton!’

Rob Sawyer

Sources and acknowledgements

Thanks to Billy Smith for encouraging me to write this piece, several years ago.


Billy and Bob: The Fabulous Balmer Brothers

William and Robert Balmer formed a fearsome, and fruitful, fraternal partnership in Everton's back-line in the early years of the 20th Century. William's selection for national team duty would also make him the club's first Scouse England cap.

They were the sons of James (a carpenter and joiner) and Martha. William Atherton was born on 29 July 1875 whilst Robert followed on 28 November 1881. The pair — better known and Billy and Bob — grew-up alongside their siblings John (born 1874) and Mary (born 1877) at the family home at 14 Crosby Green, West Derby. The boys trained as joiners but also embarked on football careers.

For Billy, the road to Goodison Park would not be a direct one. After playing youth football in the Aintree Church team, he would ply his footballing trade at full-back for a season, across the Ribble estuary, with South Shore (the Lancashire League outfit which went on to merge with Blackpool FC). Everton's committee signed Billy on 20 March 1896 on wages of 20/- per week (£1). He was joined by his elder sibling, John, who played in the forward line. The earliest record of the boys playing together was for Everton reserves at Glossop North End on 9 March 1896.

Letter to John and Bill Balmer from Everton FC, 1896 (care of Bren Connolly)

John dropped off the Everton radar fairly quickly (he preferred running to football) and concentrated on working in the family joinery business. Billy, however, was retained and debuted for the senior team on 6 November 1897, a 2-2 draw at West Bromwich Albion. It was reported that ‘. the work of Muir, Barker and Balmer was thoroughly sound. The last-named player improved considerably as the game went on.' In his second start he drew great praise: ‘None the less brilliant were Muir, Storrier, and Balmer, who coped with the occasional heavy rushes of the home forwards with great coolness and dexterity, and in addition their kicking was always clean and effective. In Balmer, the club has an understudy of exceptional merit. For a second acquaintance with League Football, the young player came out of the ordeal with flying colours, and there should be no misgiving in future should a vacancy arise in the back division.'

Within two months of the start of the following season, Billy was the first-choice at right-back — a position he held down for a decade. In time, he was joined in the Everton ranks by Bob — who would work his way up from the Lancashire Combination team. As a youth, Bob played at full-back for Shaw Street College for three years and then participated in local junior football for a further three seasons. He was on amateur terms with Everton from the 1900-01 season, progressing to professional status. An inch shorter than Billy, and a stone lighter, Bob relied slightly less on brawn, and more on timing, than his older brother. That said, as was the full-back's remit of the era: both were adept at stopping wingers in their tracks and hoofing the ball downfield. A 1925 Liverpool Echo article described, compared and contrasted them, thus:

‘There was a sturdy sureness about the defence of the Brothers Balmer, Billy and Robert, that was both taking to the eye and consoling to those famous followers of the Everton club who took their pleasures each week on the goal stands. Robert, the younger brother, was of a slimmer build than his famous brother, but as he matured and developed in his play there was a finish, and a skilled diplomacy in his style that marked him as a player of resource and enterprise. Billy, on the other hand, always impressed as one of those rugged, stonewall players, who never know fear or funk, and who could be relied on, whatever, calls were made on him to do justice to himself and to his team… Billy Balmer, at the top of his form, was an inspiring player, to watch. His resolution was quick, his methods generally fair, his tenacity superb.'

Bob would make his bow for the first team at left-back, alongside Billy, on 5 January 1903 when the Blues defeated Middlesbrough 3-0. It was almost a dream start when he went close to scoring following an early corner. The Liverpool Courier commented: ‘The Northerns next attacked, but the brothers Balmer defended strongly, both with regard to kicking and tackling.'

It would be mid-way through the 1904-05 season when Bob broke into the team on a regular basis and worked in harness with his brother to protect Leigh Richmond Roose and/or Bill Scott in the Everton goal. With Tom Booth frequently unavailable through injury, Billy captained the team for the vast majority of matches and was rewarded for his consistency with a call-up for England. It came in a 1-1 draw with Ireland staged at Ayresome Park on 5 February 1905 (he had previously represented the Football League against the Scottish League in 1901). This would be his only ‘cap' but he had written himself into the history books as the first locally-born Everton player to receive such recognition. The domestic season would end in frustration as two away defeats in the final three matches saw Everton pipped by Newcastle to the title.

Billy Balmer cigarette card

Another chance to win silverware would come a year later. Having beaten Liverpool in the 1906 FA Cup semi-final, the squad departed from Liverpool in advance of the final to be staged at the Crystal Palace stadium. The Liverpool Courier reported:

The Everton players, or rather the contingent from which the eleven will be chosen, left Liverpool on Tuesday for their training quarters at Chingford, which borders on Epping Forest. They broke their journey at Stafford to enjoy the brine baths there, and according to the latest reports, this experience was most beneficial. The contingent, which was in the charge of Mr. B. Kelly, and Mr. E.A. Bainbridge (directors), consisted of: - Scott, W. Balmer, R. Balmer, Crelley, Hill, Booth, Abbott, Makepeace, Chadwick, Sharp, Bolton, Young, Settle, Hardman, and Donnachie. At the Royal Forest Hotel, Chingford, the men have found comfortable quarters. They are staying in a beautiful district, and nothing in the way of arduous training, will be undertaken.

There was much speculation as to who would occupy the two full-back births with the Balmer brothers challenging fellow Scouser, Jack Crelley, for selection. The Courier reported on the build-up, which had little to do with football practice:

I have just seen Mr Cuff, the Everton secretary, and learned that the members of the team were all fit and well. They have benefited greatly by their stay at Chingford, which has been more like a rest than a period of special training. Golf on a four-mile course, walking amid beautiful country scenery, and occasionally sprinting has been the programme. Not a football has been kicked. The men will take the field fresh as paint, eager for the fray, and confident of victory. The exact constitution of the team will not be decided until the morning, there being just a doubt, so Mr. Cuff informs me, as to which of the Brothers Balmer will partner Crelley at the back. The younger brother, Robert, has so greatly improved that he may possibly fill the position.

Shortly before kick-off, it was confirmed that the directors had overlooked Bob in favour of Crelley and his elder brother (who occupied the left-back slot). In the tightly packed 80,000 crowd, the Liverpool Echo reporter spotted a former Toffee in Leigh Richmond Roose: ‘Among the early birds was the great Roose, keen and energetic as ever, and who was attached enough to his old club to express his heartiest wish for their success and confident in their ability.'

Billy's selection was justified as he gave an outstanding defensive performance in a 1-0 victory — Everton's first cup triumph. The Echo praised him: ‘W. Balmer probably never played a better game than on Saturday. He tackled coolly and kept a good length with his punts. He was a trifle shaky at the close, but on the whole, his performance was of a sterling character.'

In spite of being over-looked for the final, there was a school of thought that Bob was become a superior player to Billy. In October of that year, the Lancashire Evening Post asked: ‘Is Robert Balmer as good a back as his elder and better-known brother? On the few occasions I have seen the former he has impressed me very favourably, remarkably clean with his kicking and perhaps rather safer than William, who is inclined to be risky at times.' Regardless, the brothers were the preferred full-back pairing in the 1906-07 season and lined up at Crystal Palace when Everton sought to retain the FA Cup against Sheffield Wednesday. In the event, the Yorkshiremen ran out 2-1 winners and neither Balmer enjoyed a good afternoon. Athletic News reported:

‘The Balmers were fairly serviceable, but I do not think they constituted a strong pair, and they were just about on a level with the Wednesday backs. William Balmer is not quite well, and extenuating circumstances can be urged on his behalf, as he has a knee. His brother, Robert Balmer, was possibly the better of the two.'

After a further season in tandem in the back line, the siblings played their 65th and final match together in an FA Cup defeat to Southampton on 11 March 1908. At the conclusion of the season, Billy's first-team career with Everton ended on 331 competitive outings (he had scored one goal — a penalty in 1899 — but conceded eight own goals in this time). Although still registered with Everton, he was able to play for Croydon Common for whom he would make 3 FA Cup and 43 Southern League appearances over two seasons. By 1911, Billy was back on home turf and working as a newsagent at 20 Mill Lane in West Derby. He subsequently signed for Chester of the Lancashire Combination in 1912 but it was an abortive comeback as, after just two matches, he was deemed to be too immobile for further selection.

Bob, meanwhile, continued to serve the Toffees with distinction. In October 1910, Athletic News commented on his selection for an inter-league match with Ireland: ‘Like his brother, William, the younger Balmer has been one of the most consistent backs that ever donned the Everton colours and in League colours has rendered excellent service.' That same month he as reported to have kicked-off refereed a game of ‘rink football' — played on skates at the Tournament Hall. Losing his regular starting berth in the spring of 1911, and struggling with a knee injury, he made his 187th, and final, appearance for the Blues in April 1912. He remained registered with Everton as a player — but available for transfer at £300 — until the eve of the (cancelled) 1915-16 season.

In April 1913, club director Dr. Whitford proposed that Bob be offered a non-playing engagement by Everton but the proposal was voted down by fellow board members. Instead, that August, he was signed by W.J. Sawyer for South Liverpool FC. Bob's former teammate, Alex ‘Sandy' Young, was already on the books at Dingle Park. Early in 1914, the Liverpool Echo reported on Bob turning out at right-back for his new club, against The Central in Walkden. He was described as ‘simply unbeatable.' In April 1915, Bob was reunited with the 1906-07 team for a wartime charity match organised by Jack Sharp against a team of boxers. The Echo journalist reported on the match which raised £300: “At full-back Bob Balmer played capitally and showed partially again for keeping the ball in play and for overhead kicks which were specialities with him before he took to running a book. No, not that kind of book but an insurance business in which I wish him all good fortune” (nb: Some match reports record — probably erroneously — that it was Billy, rather than Bob who played in this match.)

On 25 November 1916, Bob married Blanche Farley they had no children together. It seems that Bob remained in the Everton hierarchy's affections for he was given a complimentary season ticket by the club in 1926 — a gesture that was repeated for many years. By the outbreak of the Second World War the couple were living at 12 Rosthwaite Road – close to Everton’s Bellefield training ground Bob was listed on the 1939 Register as working as a docker. Having been predeceased by Blanche, Bob passed away in hospital on 9 January 1959, at the age of age 79. He was laid to rest in West Derby Cemetery.

As for Billy, he appeared to sever all ties with Everton although he remained a ‘Blue'. He lost his first wife, Alice, in 1916 and remarried Mary Thomas in 1918. By then, he was living and working in Huddersfield. By the turn of the 1920s, he was doing some coaching at Huddersfield Town. In 1939, Billy was recorded as living at 114 Church Street, Huddersfield. His occupation was noted as “Joiner — incapacitated” whilst Mary was a ‘woollen burler'. He passed away in February 1961 at the age of 85. At the time, he was living at 154 Lowerhouses Lane in Huddersfield. He was cremated on 15 February at All Hallow's Church, Almondbury.

That is not the end of the Balmer story in Merseyside football circles, however. John Balmer's son, ‘Jack' (John) — the nephew of Billy and Bob — played football at centre-forward whilst studying at the Liverpool Collegiate. He recounted to George Harrison for his The Unforgettables series in the Liverpool Echo in 1974 that he was always destined to join Everton:

‘My uncles were Everton stalwarts… I was brought up in the Everton tradition by them and my father. When I was making the grade at 16 as centre-forward for Liverpool Collegiate Old Boys, Everton was obviously the club that came first.'

Jack duly joined the Toffees on amateur forms in 1933, aged 17, and appeared for the reserves on a number of occasions. One such outing saw him paired in attack with Bill “Dixie” Dean who was on the comeback trail after an injury. Jack was excited, but awestruck, to be lining up with his sporting idol. Dean spotted his nervousness and said, ‘Don't worry, son, I'll lay one on for you just before half-time.' True to his word, ‘Dixie' headed the ball into Jack's path five minutes for the break: ‘I couldn't miss. It made me feel great, getting a goal from my hero' he recalled. When Everton sought to sign Jack on professional forms, the talks broke down: ‘I was working as a joiner in my father's building business and Everton offered me only £5 to be on full time for them. It wasn't worth it to me… I was still on Everton's book as an amateur so I saw out the season for them. Meantime, Jack Rouse had been along to offer me £8 a week with £6 summer wages for Liverpool. So I signed, much, I should add, to the family shame. Red was not their favourite colour.'

Having joined Liverpool in September 1935, Jack made his first-team debut almost immediately. Often mistaken for a veteran due to premature balding, he carved out a highly-successful career as a clever inside-forward. During the war years, he served in the King's Regiment, teaching soldiers to drive Bren-gun carriers and Jeeps near Formby and, towards the end of the conflict, he was posted to Germany. He earned a wartime England cap in 1939, playing alongside Everton's Tommy Lawton. Post-war, paired with Albert Stubbins, he captained Liverpool to the 1946-47 League Championship and scored three consecutive hat-tricks in November 1946. In spite of these credentials and an impressive career strike rate, in the late 1940s he found himself a target of some Anfield ‘boo-boys' who took exception to his intelligent, dare I say, Corinthian, approach to the game. These malcontents craved a more harum-scarum style of forward-play which was an anathema to Jack. His game was more subtle: based on skill, creativity and nous. He explained to George Harrison: ‘They were entitled to their opinion. Maybe I didn't go in for the crunch tackle — it seemed unnecessary to me. Even now, when I go and watch Everton or Liverpool, or see television games, I get a shudder when I see the boot going in. I was never a coward at the game, but that kind of tackling was never my idea of football.'

Left: Jack Balmer in post-war action versus Everton Right: Jack Balmer and Tommy G. Jones take to the field for a Merseyside derby

Jack hung up his boots in 1953 and, after a period coaching Liverpool's youth players and scouting, he concentrated on the family building business — enjoying playing golf in his spare time. He passed away, suddenly, on Christmas Day 1984, at the age of 68 following a heart attack. After a funeral service at St Mary's Church in West Derby, he was cremated at Anfield Crematorium. Concluding his 1974 interview with George Harrison he said: ‘I cannot forget those great years I had at Anfield, even if some of the Kop didn't go for me all that much. And you know something? I still like Everton!'


William Balmer

<p>There are several references to Billy but he seems to haved lived with both his father and grand father at Billinge Rant and Shealey Brow farm. William and Ellen built the house at 210 Billinge Rd (pictured) after riding by one day in a pony and trap and deciding it was a nice place for a house - they kept farm animals on land at the back. I used to live there for 4 years after I was born<p>Agevaries on census but is probably between 1843 and 1848 - his death would put him at 46 but his wedding cert puts him around july 48. His age varies on all docs it seems . I also suspect they may have been to Ireland in the 1840's</p> <p>Interesting suspicion, his brother James seem to vary slightly, I suspect they are twins but only circumstantial evidence, eg on James wedding cert he puts his age 45 which would indicate birthdates end of May - Jul 1848</p> <p>tracing him is complex since there is another William Balmer with same grandparent and the wider family under James snr often resided at each others homes (close by)</p> <p>One of the Billys not sure which yet was in court at least twice and received 1 year in jail . they had quite a colourful past -) . Despite this both William and James left very sizeable wills (each worth approx 23000 to 170000 in 2019 money depending on how you measure inflation and income growth). Not bad for miners / farmers</p> <p>The gravestoneoriginally had a large iron cross but the church removed it when it became unsafe - source = local priest -) - only a hole now!</p> <p>Unfortunately some of their uncles seem untraceable to date . requires trip to Preston for Lancashire records for St Marys Birchley </p> <p> </p>

GEDCOM Note

GEDCOM Source

1891 England & Wales Census MyHeritage What can you find in the census?Census returns can help you determine who your ancestors were, and can also tell you:- Where your ancestors were living- Who they were living with- What their occupations were- If they had any servants- Who their neighbours were- If they had any brothers and sisters- What their ages were at the time of the census- If they had any disabilities.As well as giving you the above information, the fact that census returns are taken every ten years also allows you to track the movements of your ancestors through time as they perhaps move house, get married, have children or even change occupations.The fields which have been transcribed for the census are:- First name- Middle name- Last name- Sex- Birth place- Age- Place of residence- County- Relationship to head of householdWhy this collection is so valuableCensus records are valuable since they can tell you where a person lived at a certain place and time. Censuses were conducted by the federal government andwill offer a variety of information, depending on year. Census records can answer questions like where your ancestors were living at the time the census was taken, who they were living with, what their occupations were, who their neighbors were, if they had any brothers and sisters, what their ages were at the time of the census and if they had any disabilities.Searching the censusThe golden ruleof family history is to check the original historical record, or 'primary source', wherever possible. We have provided clear images of the original census enumeration books for you to view once you've found the right family in the indexes. When using census returns you should first search the transcriptions to help locate your ancestor in the census, and then view the original images to validate your findings. It will also help you see the household in the context of surrounding households. This is particularly important as transcribing an entire census is a huge and difficult task, and whilst we have used the expertise of our transcribers and the experience of key representatives from the genealogy community to help us translate the records, it is inevitable that there will be some errors.Next stepsWith the information you gain from these census records, you will have the information you need to search for vital records in the locality where you found your ancestor. Also, the fact that census returns are taken every ten years also allows you to track the movements of our ancestors through time as they perhaps move house, get married, have children or even change occupations. Collection 10155 MH:S500008

GEDCOM Source

https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823383/william-b. 4 William Balmer&ltbr&gtGender: Male&ltbr&gtBirth: Circa 1843 - Billinge, Lancashire&ltbr&gtResidence: 1891 - 14 Sims Lane End, Downall Green, Lancaster, England&ltbr&gtAge: 48&ltbr&gtMarital status: Married&ltbr&gtOccupation: Coal Miner&ltbr&gtEmployed: Yes&ltbr&gtInhabited: 1&ltbr&gtNumber of rooms: 4&ltbr&gtWife: Ellen Balmer&ltbr&gtChildren: Mary E Balmer, Alice Balmer, William Balmer, John Balmer&ltbr&gtCensus: Urban district:AshtonSeries:RG12 Parish:AshtonPiece:3067 Township:Downall GreenEnumerated by:Samuel B Coburn Ecclesiastical district:Holy TrinityEnum. District:2 Parlamentary borough:NewtonPage:35 Registration district:Wigan, Ashton in MakerfieldFamily:140 County:LancasterLine:5 Country:EnglandImage:26 Date:1891-00-00 See household members&ltbr&gt&lta &gt&lt/a&gtHousehold&ltbr&gtRelation to head Name Age Suggested alternatives&ltbr&gtHead &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823383/william-b. "&gtWilliam Balmer&lt/a&gt 48 &ltbr&gtWife &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823384/ellen-bal. "&gtEllen Balmer&lt/a&gt 40 &ltbr&gtDaughter &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823385/mary-e-ba. "&gtMary E Balmer&lt/a&gt 15 &ltbr&gtDaughter &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823386/alice-bal. "&gtAlice Balmer&lt/a&gt 8 &ltbr&gtSon &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823387/william-b. "&gtWilliam Balmer&lt/a&gt 5 &ltbr&gtSon &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823388/john-balm. "&gtJohn Balmer&lt/a&gt 3 &ltbr&gtSister in Law &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823389/esther-sp. "&gtEsther Speakman&lt/a&gt 36 &ltbr&gtLodger &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10155-19823390/thomas-po. "&gtThomas Power&lt/a&gt 14 Record 10155:19823383-:f83dc45a79149ae14041ed96ecf00c0d

GEDCOM Source

1871 England & Wales Census MyHeritage What can you find in the census?Census returns can help you determine who your ancestors were, and can also tell you:- Where your ancestors were living- Who they were living with- What their occupations were- If they had any servants- Who their neighbours were- If they had any brothers and sisters- What their ages were at the time of the census- If they had any disabilities.As well as giving you the above information, the fact that census returns are taken every ten years also allows you to track the movements of your ancestors through time as they perhaps move house, get married, have children or even change occupations.The fields which have been transcribed for the census are:- First name- Middle name- Last name- Sex- Birth place- Age- Place of residence- County- Relationship to head of householdWhy this collection is so valuableCensus records are valuable since they can tell you where a person lived at a certain place and time. Censuses were conducted by the federal government andwill offer a variety of information, depending on year. Census records can answer questions like where your ancestors were living at the time the census was taken, who they were living with, what their occupations were, who their neighbors were, if they had any brothers and sisters, what their ages were at the time of the census and if they had any disabilities.Searching the censusThe golden ruleof family history is to check the original historical record, or 'primary source', wherever possible. We have provided clear images of the original census enumeration books for you to view once you've found the right family in the indexes. When using census returns you should first search the transcriptions to help locate your ancestor in the census, and then view the original images to validate your findings. It will also help you see the household in the context of surrounding households. This is particularly important as transcribing an entire census is a huge and difficult task, and whilst we have used the expertise of our transcribers and the experience of key representatives from the genealogy community to help us translate the records, it is inevitable that there will be some errors.Next stepsWith the information you gain from these census records, you will have the information you need to search for vital records in the locality where you found your ancestor. Also, the fact that census returns are taken every ten years also allows you to track the movements of our ancestors through time as they perhaps move house, get married, have children or even change occupations. Collection 10153 MH:S500021

GEDCOM Source

https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10153-15426579/william-b. 4 William Balmer&ltbr&gtGender: Male&ltbr&gtBirth: Circa 1844 - Lancashire, England&ltbr&gtResidence: 1871 - Lower Rant, Billinge, Billinge Chapel End, Lancashire, England&ltbr&gtAge: 27&ltbr&gtFather: James Balmer&ltbr&gtMother: Mary Balmer&ltbr&gtSiblings: John Balmer, Sarah A Balmer&ltbr&gtCensus: Ecclesiastical district:BillingeSeries:RG10Page:178 Parish:Billinge Chapel EndPiece:3897Family:94 County:LancashireRegistrar's district:UphollandLine:22 Country:EnglandSuperintendent registrar's district:WiganImage:17 Date:1871Enum. District:10 See household members&ltbr&gt&lta &gt&lt/a&gtHousehold&ltbr&gtRelation to head Name Age Suggested alternatives&ltbr&gtHead &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10153-15426577/james-bal. "&gtJames Balmer&lt/a&gt 59 &ltbr&gtWife &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10153-15426578/mary-balm. "&gtMary Balmer&lt/a&gt 60 &ltbr&gtSon &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10153-15426579/william-b. "&gtWilliam Balmer&lt/a&gt 27 &ltbr&gtSon &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10153-15426580/john-balm. "&gtJohn Balmer&lt/a&gt 23 &ltbr&gtDaughter &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10153-15426581/sarah-a-b. "&gtSarah A Balmer&lt/a&gt 17 Record 10153:15426579-:e627ea5bfc2f9e413e4398a40ba561d6

GEDCOM Source

1881 England & Wales Census MyHeritage What can you find in the census?Census returns can help you determine who your ancestors were, and can also tell you:- Where your ancestors were living- Who they were living with- What their occupations were- If they had any servants- Who their neighbours were- If they had any brothers and sisters- What their ages were at the time of the census- If they had any disabilities.As well as giving you the above information, the fact that census returns are taken every ten years also allows you to track the movements of your ancestors through time as they perhaps move house, get married, have children or even change occupations.The fields which have been transcribed for the census are:- First name- Middle name- Last name- Sex- Birth place- Age- Place of residence- County- Relationship to head of householdWhy this collection is so valuableCensus records are valuable since they can tell you where a person lived at a certain place and time. Censuses were conducted by the federal government andwill offer a variety of information, depending on year. Census records can answer questions like where your ancestors were living at the time the census was taken, who they were living with, what their occupations were, who their neighbors were, if they had any brothers and sisters, what their ages were at the time of the census and if they had any disabilities.Searching the censusThe golden ruleof family history is to check the original historical record, or 'primary source', wherever possible. We have provided clear images of the original census enumeration books for you to view once you've found the right family in the indexes. When using census returns you should first search the transcriptions to help locate your ancestor in the census, and then view the original images to validate your findings. It will also help you see the household in the context of surrounding households. This is particularly important as transcribing an entire census is a huge and difficult task, and whilst we have used the expertise of our transcribers and the experience of key representatives from the genealogy community to help us translate the records, it is inevitable that there will be some errors.Next stepsWith the information you gain from these census records, you will have the information you need to search for vital records in the locality where you found your ancestor. Also, the fact that census returns are taken every ten years also allows you to track the movements of our ancestors through time as they perhaps move house, get married, have children or even change occupations. Collection 10154 MH:S500023

GEDCOM Source

https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10154-45935337/william-b. 4 William Balmer&ltbr&gtGender: Male&ltbr&gtBirth: Circa 1846 - Billinge, Lancashire&ltbr&gtResidence: 1881 - Sims Lane End Billinge Lane, Sims Lane End, Ashton in Makerfield, Lancashire, England&ltbr&gtAge: 35&ltbr&gtMarital status: Married&ltbr&gtOccupation: Coal Miner&ltbr&gtInhabited: 1&ltbr&gtWife: Ellen Balmer&ltbr&gtDaughter: Mary E Balmer&ltbr&gtCensus: Urban district:Ashton in MakerfieldSeries:RG11Image:21 Parish:Ashton in MakerfieldPiece:3784 Village:Sims Lane EndRegistrar's district:Wigan Ecclesiastical district:Holy TrinityEnumerated by:Thomas Aspinall Registration district:Ashton in MakerfieldEnum. District:2 County:LancashirePage:30 Country:EnglandFamily:113 Date:1881-00-00Line:15 See household members&ltbr&gt&lta &gt&lt/a&gtHousehold&ltbr&gtRelation to head Name Age Suggested alternatives&ltbr&gtHead &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10154-45935337/william-b. "&gtWilliam Balmer&lt/a&gt 35 &ltbr&gtWife &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10154-45935338/ellen-bal. "&gtEllen Balmer&lt/a&gt 29 &ltbr&gtDaughter &lta href="https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10154-45935339/mary-e-ba. "&gtMary E Balmer&lt/a&gt 5 Record 10154:45935337-:b2a7321a8027ed23146a2fba414b7141

GEDCOM Source

steve orobec orobec Web Site MyHeritage family tree Family site: orobec Web Site Family tree: 596917251-1 Smart Matching 596917251-1 MH:S500005

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

FamilySearch Family Tree MyHeritage The FamilySearch Family Tree is published by MyHeritage under license from FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church). Collection 40001 MH:S500001


Exploring Engineering : An Introduction to Engineering and Design

Exploring Engineering, Fourth Edition: An Introduction to Engineering and Design, winner of a 2017 Textbook Excellence Award (Texty), presents the emerging challenges engineers face in a wide range of areas as they work to help improve our quality of life. In this classic textbook, the authors explain what engineers actually do, from the fundamental principles that form the basis of their work to the application of that knowledge within a structured design process. The text itself is organized into three parts: Lead-On, Minds-On, Hands-On. This organization allows the authors to give a basic introduction to engineering methods, then show the application of these principles and methods, and finally present a design challenge. This book is an ideal introduction for anyone interested in exploring the various fields of engineering and learning how engineers work to solve problems.

  • Winner of a 2017 Textbook Excellence Award (Texty) from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association
  • NEW: Chapters on Aeronautical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Design Teams
  • NEW: Expanded content in the chapters "Defining the Problem," "Generation of 'Alternative Concepts'," and "Detailed Design"
  • NEW: Material on sustainability issues in engineering
  • Introduces students to the engineering profession, emphasizing the fundamental physical, chemical, and material bases for all engineering work
  • Includes an Engineering Ethics Decision Matrix used throughout the book to pose ethical challenges and explore decision-making in an engineering context
  • Lists of "Top Engineering Achievements" and "Top Engineering Challenges" help put the material in context and show engineering as a vibrant discipline involved in solving societal problems
  • Companion Web site includes links to several new drawing supplements, including "Free-hand Engineering Sketching," (detailed instructions on free-hand engineering sketching) "AutoCAD Introduction," (an introduction to the free AutoCAD drawing software) and "Design Projects," (new freshman-level design projects that complement the "Hands-On" part of the textbook).

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Об авторе (2015)

Dr. Kosky spent two years at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in the UK before joining the GE Research Center Schenectady, NY where he was a career scientist and engineer until retiring in 2001. From 2001 to 2007 he was a Distinguished Research Professor of Engineering at Union College. He has written nearly 200 publications and other reports including about 25 patents.

Dr. Balmer has worked as an engineer at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory and at various DuPont facilities. He has over 40 years of engineering teaching experience and has authored 70 technical publications and the Elsevier undergraduate engineering textbook Modern Engineering Thermodynamics.

Dr. Keat has been teaching design for 20 years, in courses ranging from freshman engineering to a graduate course in design methodology. Has been awarded two Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Teacher Awards and two first place finishes at the Mini-Baja East Competition while serving as an advisor.

Dr. Wise is a former communications specialist and historian at General Electric's Global Research Center in Niskayuna, NY. After retiring from GE he served as Deputy Director of the Dudley Observatory, Schenectady, NY and Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Union College. He has authored two books and numerous papers on the history of science and technology, winning the Usher Prize of the Society for History of Technology for one of them.


William Holgate Balmer (1903 - 1982)

BIRTH. 1903 Name: William Holgate Balmer Event Type: Birth Registration Registration Quarter: Jul-Aug-Sep Registration Year: 1903 Registration District: Auckland County: Durham Event Place: Auckland, Durham, England Volume: 10A, Page: 280, Affiliate Line Number: 148 England and Wales Census, 1911: Name: John Balmer Event Type: Census Event Date: 1911 Event Place: Auckland St Anne, Durham, England, United Kingdom County: Durham Parish: West Auckland Sub-District: Hamsterley Sub-District Number: 2 District Number: 547 Enumeration District: 1 Registration District: Auckland Gender: Male Age: 41 Marital Status: Married Marital Status (Original): Occupation: COLLIERY LABOURER ABOVE GROUND Number in Family: 4 Birth Year (Estimated): 1870 Birthplace: Etherley, Durham Relationship to Head of Household: Head Schedule Type: 361 Page Number: 1 Registration Number: RG14 Piece/Folio: 721 Affiliate Record Identifier: GBC/1911/RG14/29751/0721/1 HOUSEHOLD ROLE SEX AGE BIRTHPLACE John Balmer Head Male 41 Etherley, Durham Mary Tace Balmer Wife Female 39 Etherley, Durham John Craighill Balmer Son Male 14 Etherley, Durham Henry Swalwell Balmer Son Male 11 Etherley, Durham William Holgate Balmer Son Male 7 Etherley, Durham

MARRIAGE (1). 1938, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

MARRIAGE (1). 1938, Elvie Irene Moncrieff, daughter of James Moncrieff & Lillian May (Allan/Allen) Moncrieff

MARRIAGE (1). WA BDM Marriage Reg: #899/1938 Family name Balmer Given names William H Family name of Spouse Moncrieff Given names of Spouse Elvie I Place of marriage Perth

Fate of Spouse (1): DEATH. 28 Sep 1964, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

MARRIAGE (2). 1948, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

MARRIAGE (2). 1948, Carmel Dawn Moore, daughter of ??

MARRIAGE (2). WA BDM Marriage Reg: #3027/1948 Family name Balmer Given names William H Family name of Spouse Moore Given names of Spouse Carmel D Place of marriage Perth

DEATH. 15 Mar 1982, Western Australia, Australia

CREMATION. KARRAKATTA CEMETERY BALMER WILLIAM HOLGATE Age 78 years Place of residence HIGHGATE Date of Death 15/03/1982 Ashes Request DISPERSED AT KARRAKATTA CEMETERY


Exploring Engineering : An Introduction to Engineering and Design

Engineers solve problems, and work on emerging challenges in a wide range of areas important to improving quality of life areas like sustainable energy, access to clean water, and improved communications and health care technologies. Kosky et. al. explore the world of engineering by introducing the reader to what engineers do, the fundamental principles that form the basis of their work, and how they apply that knowledge within a structured design process. The three part organization of the text reinforces these areas, making this an ideal introduction for anyone interested in exploring the various fields of engineering and learning how engineers work to solve problems.

  • NEW: Additional discussions on what engineers do, and the distinctions among engineers, technicians, and managers (Chapter 1)
  • NEW: Re-organized and updated chapters in Part II to more closely align with specific engineering disciplines
  • NEW: New chapters on emerging fields of engineering, including Bioengineering and Green Energy Engineering
  • NEW: Discussions of Design for Six Sigma integrated into Part III on the design process
  • An Engineering Ethics Decision Matrix is introduced in Chapter 1 and used throughout the book to pose ethical challenges and explore ethical decision-making in an engineering context
  • Lists of "Top Engineering Achievements" and "Top Engineering Challenges" help put the material in context and show engineering as a vibrant discipline involved in solving societal problems

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Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения

Об авторе (2013)

Dr. Kosky spent two years at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in the UK before joining the GE Research Center Schenectady, NY where he was a career scientist and engineer until retiring in 2001. From 2001 to 2007 he was a Distinguished Research Professor of Engineering at Union College. He has written nearly 200 publications and other reports including about 25 patents.

Dr. Balmer has worked as an engineer at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory and at various DuPont facilities. He has over 40 years of engineering teaching experience and has authored 70 technical publications and the Elsevier undergraduate engineering textbook Modern Engineering Thermodynamics.

Dr. Keat has been teaching design for 20 years, in courses ranging from freshman engineering to a graduate course in design methodology. Has been awarded two Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Teacher Awards and two first place finishes at the Mini-Baja East Competition while serving as an advisor.

Dr. Wise is a former communications specialist and historian at General Electric's Global Research Center in Niskayuna, NY. After retiring from GE he served as Deputy Director of the Dudley Observatory, Schenectady, NY and Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Union College. He has authored two books and numerous papers on the history of science and technology, winning the Usher Prize of the Society for History of Technology for one of them.


Tuesday, February 24, 2009

List of the names of the Fort St. David Garrison 1703

A list of all the Europeans Topasses and Lascars in the Rt. Hono.ble Comp.as service in Fort St. David & Cuddalore.

James Hugonin Lieut
James Davis Do. 2

Robert Reay – married a White woman
Hendy Kerr
Samuell Williams – married a Black woman
Michaell Smith

Francis Carter married B. W.
Edward Brookes
Jacob De Poane married B. W.
John Houseden
Thomas Welch married B. W,
Richard Hobbs
Rowland Willson Gent of arms
William Hobey married B.W.
James Kean
Seth Ward
William Gilbert
John Craven
Robert Tandey

Alexander Pillow Do.
Daniell Jarmon Do.
Daniell Renno
Joseph Cox
William Smith Do.
George Hardick
William Compere
Richard Lec
William Knight Do.
Adam Dixon Do.
Peter Piccar Do.
Samwell Harris
Boenjarmin Hobbs
Boejamin Yardley
Robert Mason
John Brown Do.
Alexander Humber
Henry Watson
John Ros
John Jones
James Neeve

English Sentinells Living 30

Edward Hearnhead
Antony Ayres
Trustrum Fletewood
Edmund Toole married a Black woman
William Goodman
Thomas Corson do.
Benjamin Moreess
Edward Rickets
John Hox
Robert Glover
John Matthews do.
Peter Brown
Henry Colles
Alexandr Hamlet
John Deenecroft Died June 15th 1702.
John Edward
William Poaker
Edward Williams
William Lane
Jeremiah Kent
John Motrum Died Aug 25th 1702
Cornelius Adam
Bejarmin Gladwell
Edward Heiling
Thomas Joy
Thomas Houlding
Peter Belwill
John Wheler
William Thompson
Richard Parrottt
Henry Bready
Joseph Jackson Drumr.

Anthony Veless do.
Franco De Pena
Psaitian Pementa De Saw

Hans Gosper
Hendrick Swart
Henry Peters
Hans Vancink do.
Augustine Powell
George Pyper do.
John Jurdin
Michaell Porockett do.
John Peterson do.
Peter Johnson
William Tunis
Hans Andreas
Joyce Storam
Peter Francisco
Peter Johnson Minor married BW
Sevarand Peterson
Alexander Magnus
John Johnson
George Johnson Run Jan 17th 1701/2
Adrian Johnson Do time
Hans Grocewall Died March 6th 1701/2

Europeans in the Military 92
Topasses in the Military 198
In all 290

William Walker Gunner
Thomas Emmed Chief Mate married W woman
William Owen 2d Mate do.
John Gardiner 3d do.
James Walker Copper
John Williamson
Thomas Champion
Thomas Hubberd
Nathaniell Pane
Benjamin Poremfeild
William Walkers Died October 22d 1701
Vinter Owen Do Decembr 22d 1702
John Wiklefield Do July 28yh 1702

Hendrick Harrison
Havmum Lambeck
Hendrick Johnson
Convaught Johnson
William Garratson married a Black woman
Jonathan Molt do.
Jacob Scriver
Isaac Martin
Garret Corneliven do.
Wm. Thornbury Run Novemb. 10th 1701
John Wood do.
John Frankland do.
Stephen Emmais do.
Barnet Cornelison
Gabriell Knope
Topasses 4
Lascars 26

English Europeans living 10
Dutch do 11
Topasses 4
Lascars 26

October 1702 Recd Loyall Cooke
20th May 1703

From British Library, OIOC IOR/G/18/9


Table tennis powerhouse: South Bend club still thrives after championship past

SOUTH BEND — Dion Payne-Miller didn’t know much about the game when he and his brother first came to the South Bend Table Tennis Club.

“I had a mentor who brought me here,” he said of Margie Davis, the person who introduced him to the club — and the game.

Payne-Miller, now a senior at Adams High School, learned how to play table tennis, and he also learned about the history of the South Bend Table Tennis Club. That history goes back to 1937, when Hungarian immigrant John Varga founded the club, along with Weldon B. Hester, at the YMCA building in downtown South Bend. Hester was the secretary of boys programs at the Y.

Over the years, the club has seen its share of ups and downs. It went dormant from 1965 until the late 1970s, when a group of Indiana University South Bend students revived it.

World class coaches like Victor Tolkachev and Dan Seemiller restored the club’s reputation as a training ground for national and international players. Tolkachev coached the team for three years in the mid-1990s before returning to his native Latvia. Seemiller moved from Pittsburgh to South Bend and has served as coach since 1997. Mark Hazinski, one of Seemiller’s players, was a member of the 2004 Olympic team.

It’s not surprising that a lot of people don’t know about South Bend’s history as a table tennis powerhouse. That’s not because table tennis is unpopular.

But when most people think of table tennis, the first thing that comes to mind is ping-pong — the game played by generations of kids in basements and rec centers across America. Seemiller said ping-pong is a long way from table tennis.

“In America, millions of people play ping-pong, but not that many play competitive tennis,” He said. “The main difference is in the equipment.”

It’s hard to compare the game we played on those rickety tables to the aggressive, fast-paced game conducted by skilled players, featuring tricky spin serves, long volleys and amazing return shots.

Brad Balmer, one of the IUSB students who revived the club in the 1970s, said generations of players who developed and nurtured their skills at the South Bend Table Tennis Club can take credit for turning it into a national powerhouse. He’s telling the story of the club’s history on its website in an effort to preserve the past and encourage future players.

“I want the current members and the future members we are trying to recruit to know that there is a legacy and history behind this club,” said Balmer, who lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Players from the club went to a tournament in Grand Rapids in 1979, when Balmer met a man named Bill Maxwell. Maxwell was from South Bend and gave Balmer a detailed history of the club. That’s what inspired Balmer to collect and preserve the club’s history.

Over the years, Balmer connected with others who played for the club between 1937 and 1965, collecting photographs and other memorabilia. In the early 1990s, Balmer even managed to track down Hester, who had moved away from the area to work for a YMCA on the East Coast.

“We had a long conversation and then we started writing back and forth, and then he wrote down how the club started,” Balmer said. “He told me the whole story and then he wrote it down, and that was the start of getting some of the initial history.”

That history, along with current happenings at the club, can be found on www.southbendtabletennis.com. The site also features profiles on past championship players and videos of matches, including some from the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s.

The club holds open play on Sunday, while training nights for members of the junior table tennis team are held on Tuesday and Wednesday, with league play on Thursday. The junior program takes students from elementary grades up to high school.

“The basic idea as a coach is to give them the best fundamentals and then they can be the best they can be,” Seemiller said.

Payne-Miller was among a group of about 15 players gathered at The Beacon for league night last Thursday. The group also included Dan Cochran, whose sons, Andy, Gordy and Joey, made some of the club’s history. Joey twice won the championship for men under the age of 22.

Cochran’s sons started playing on a table purchased for the family.

“When they heard about the club, they were eager to get down there and start playing,” Cochran recalled.


Watch the video: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous - May 2014 (November 2021).