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USS Boggs (DD-136/ DMS-3)

USS Boggs (DD-136/ DMS-3)


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USS Boggs (DD-136/ DMS-3)

USS Boggs (DD-136/ DMS-3) was a Wickes class destroyer that spent most of the interwar years on experimental duties, before serving as a minesweeper in the Pacific from 1940 to 1944.

The Boggs was named after Charles Stuart Boggs, a US naval officer during the Mexican War and American Civil War, who retired with the rank of Rear Admiral.

The Boggs was laid down on 15 November 1917 at Mare Island Navy Yard, launched on 25 April 1918 and commissioned on 23 September 1918. She served off the US West Coast from then until March 1919, so didn't enter any of the active war zones of the First World War. She then moved to the East Coast, where she helped support the first successful trans-Atlantic flight, by the Navy Curtiss flying boat NC-4 in May 1919. She was posted off the coast of Newfoundland as a navigation aide and rescue ship. She also operated in the North Atlantic and the West Indies. This lasted until the autumn of 1920 when she returned to the west coast, and her base at San Diego. She operated with the fleet until she was decommissioned on 27 June 1922.

The Boggs was recommissioned on 19 December 1931, this time as the radio-controlled target ship AG-19. She joined Mobile Target Division 1, Destroyers, Battle Force, and spent the next nine years taking part in high speed radio control tests, towing gunnery targets and minesweeping. She spent most of this period off the West Coast, but visited the West Indies and the East Coast in 1934 and the winter of 1938-1939, and visited Pearl Harbor in 1936.

In September 1940 the Boggs took part in the general fleet move to Hawaii, and by 1941 was based at Pearl Harbor. On 19 November 1940 she was redesignated as the high speed minesweeper DMS-3, but she continued to operate as a target tug as well. Late in 1941 she underwent a major overhaul at Mare Island.

The Boggs was at see off Oahu when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, and she quickly returned to port to sweep for mines. The US entry into the war didn't actually alter her routine that much, and she spent most of the period between then and April 1944 carrying out her normal mix of target towing and mine sweeping duties, with some patrol and escort missions added. On 31 Junary 1943 she departed from Pearl Harbor, heading for Palmyra, where she was based for one month. During this time she carried out one round trip to Canton Island, before returning to Pearl Harbor on 2 March.

In the spring of 1944 she was ordered back to the West Coast, and on 4 April she reached San Francisco, where she continued with her target towing duties. On 5 June 1945 she became AG-19 once again. Soon afterwards she returned to Pearl Harbor. She then moved closer to the war zone, and was based at Eniwetok Atoll in the Marshall Islands from mid-August until 6 October 1945.

After returning to Pearl Harbor in October 1945, she moved to Philadelphia, arriving on 11 February 1946. She was decommissioned on 20 March 1945 and sold for scrap on 27 November 1946.

Displacement (standard)

1,160t (design)

Displacement (loaded)

Top Speed

35kts (design)
35.34kts at 24,610shp at 1,149t on trial (Wickes)

Engine

2 shaft Parsons turbines
4 boilers
24,200shp (design)

Range

3,800nm at 15kts on trial (Wickes)
2,850nm at 20kts on trial (Wickes)

Armour - belt

- deck

Length

314ft 4in

Width

30ft 11in

Armaments (as built)

Four 4in/50 guns
Twelve 21in torpedoes in four triple tubes
Two depth charge tracks

Crew complement

114

Launched

Commissioned


USS Boggs DD-136

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DD-136 Boggs

Boggs (DD-136) was launched 25 April 1918 by Mare Island Navy Yard sponsored by Miss Ruth Hascal and commissioned 23 September 1918, Commander H. V. McKittrick in command.

Boggs departed San Diego in March 1919 for a six months cruise along the east coast, in the North Atlantic and in the Caribbean. Upon her return she served with the Pacific Fleet until placed out of commission 29 June 1922. Redesignated a miscellaneous auxiliary (AG-19) 5 September 1931, she was recommissioned 19 December 1931 and assigned to Mobile Target Division 1, Battle Force, for high-speed radio control tests, target towing and minesweeping. Except for a cruise to the east coast (January-October 1934) she served off the west coast until 1940. She arrived at Pearl Harbor 11 September 1940. Late in 1940 she was reclassified a high speed minesweeper (DMS-3).

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (7 December 1941) found Boggs at sea but she returned later in the day to sweep the approaches and anchorage. She remained at Pearl Harbor on minesweeping, patrol, and training duty until January 1943 when she made a run to Canton Island, Phoenix Islands with supplies. She returned to Pearl Harbor 2 March i943 and for the next year served in the vicinity as a patrol vessel, minesweeper, and towboat. She served as a target towing vessel with the Operational Training Command out of San Diego (12 April 1944-March 1945). Following overhaul at San Pedro, Calif. (March-June 1945) she was stripped of her sweeping gear and reclassified AG-19, 5 June 1945. Fitted for high-speed target towing Boggs arrived at Eniwetok, Marshall Islands, via Pearl Harbor, 15 August 1946. She remained at Eniwetok until 6 October 1945 and then returned to the United States, arriving in early 1946. Boggs was decommissioned 20 March 1946 and sold 27 November 1946.


Flush Decks and Four Pipes: The Classic Wickes and Clemson Class Destroyers

I have so much I could write about right now but instead I am going to go back to the well and dredge up an older post about some iconic warships. I guess that you can say that I am kind of taking a bit of a break from the present to remember the past, but be assured, a lot of stuff is percolating in my mind, so be expecting some new material sometime soon, but for the next few days, unless something really dramatic happens I will be continuing to re-pubish some older articles about historic warships that I find fascinating.

USS Pope DD-225

The destroyers of the Wickes and Clemsonclasses defined the destroyer force of the U.S. Navy. In 1916 with the advent of the submarine as an effective weapon of war the Navy realized that its pervious classes of destroyers were insufficient to meet the new threat. Likewise the lack of endurance of earlier destroyers kept them from vital scouting missions since the U.S. Navy unlike the Royal Navy or Imperial German Navy maintained few cruisers for such missions.

USS Paul Jones DD-230 late war note 3 stacks and radar

The Naval Appropriation Act of 1916 included the authorization of 50 Wickes Class destroyers to compliment 10 new battleships, 6 battlecruisers and 10 light cruisers with the goal of building a Navy second to none. The new destroyers were designed for high speed operations and intentionally designed for mass production setting a precedent for the following Clemson class as well as the destroyer classes built during the Second World War.

USS Boggs DMS-3

The Wickes Class had a designed speed of 35 knots in order to be able to operate with the new Omaha Classlight cruisers and Lexington Class Battlecruisers in the role of scouting for the fleet. They were flush-decked which provided additional hull strength and their speed was due to the additional horsepower provided by their Parsons turbines which produced 24,610 hp. They were 314’ long and had a 30 foot beam. Displacing 1247 tons full load they were 100 tons larger than the previous Caldwell class ships. They were armed with four 4 inch 50 caliber guns, one 3” 23 caliber gun and twelve 21” torpedo tubes.

USS Crosby APD 17

Although they were very fast they proved to be very “wet” ships forward and despite carrying an additional 100 tons of fuel they still lacked range. Due to the realization the U-Boat war required more escorts the order for Wickes Class ships was increased and 111 wear completed by 1919.

The Wickes Classwas followed by the Clemson Class which was an expansion of the Wickes class being more tailored to anti-submarine warfare. They had a greater displacement due to additional fuel tanks and mounted the same armament had identical dimensions and were capable of 35 knots but had a larger rudder to give them a tighter turning radius. 156 ships of the class were completed.

Honda Point Disaster

In the inter-war years a number of each class were scrapped and 7 of the Clemson Class from DESRON 11 were lost in the Honda Point Disaster of September 8th 1923.

Many of the ships never saw combat in either war as numerous ships were scrapped due to the limitations of the London Naval Treaty. Of the 267 ships of the two classes only 165 were still in service in 1936. As new destroyers were added to the navy in the 1930s a number of ships from each class were converted to other uses. Some became High Speed Transports (APD) and carried 4 LCVP landing craft and a small number of troops, usually about a company sized element. Others were converted to High Speed Minelayers (DM) or High Speed Minesweepers (DMS). A few were converted to Light Seaplane Tenders (AVD). Those converted to other uses had their armament reduced with dual purpose 3” 50 caliber guns replacing the 4” guns and the removal of their torpedoes. Those which remained received 6 of the 3” guns to replace their original gun armament and lost half of their torpedo tubes. During the war all would have light additional anti-aircraft armament and radar installed.

USS Stewart DD-224 after return from Japanese service

In 1940 19 of the Clemson Class and 27 of the Wickes Class were transferred to the British Royal Navy under the Lend Lease program. Some of these would see later service in the Soviet Navy being transferred by the Royal Navy serving after the war with those ships being scrapped between 1950 and 1952.

The ships of these classes performed admirably during the Second World War despite their age. The USS Ward DD-139 fired the first shots of the war when it engaged and sank a Japanese midget sub outside of Pearl Harbor. The 13 ships of the Asiatic Fleet’s DESRON 29 took part in six engagements against far superior Japanese Navy units while operating in the Philippines and then in the Dutch East Indies as part of the ABDA Command including the Battle of Balikpapan where the USS John D FordDD-228, USS Pope DD-225, USS Paul Jones DD-230 and USS Parrot DD-218 sank 4 Japanese transports. During that campaign 4 of these gallant ships were sunk in battle and a 5th the USS Stewart DD-224 was salvaged by the Japanese after being damaged and placed in a floating drydock at Surabaya following the Battle of Badung Strait. She was placed in service as a patrol ship by the Imperial Navy. She was discovered by U.S. Forces after the surrender and returned to the U.S. Navy.

HMS Cambeltown (ex USS Buchanan DD-131) at St Nazaire

Whether in the Atlantic or the Pacific the ships contributed to the Allied victory. The former USS Buchanan DD-131 which had been transferred to the Royal Navy where she was re-named the HMS Campbeltownand used in the Saint-Nazaire Raid. For the raid she was altered in appearance to look like a German Möwe class destroyer was rammed into the only drydock on the Atlantic capable of holding the Battleship Tirpitz. The mission was successful and the drydock was unusable by the Germans for the rest of the war.

During the war they served in every major campaign and when no longer fit for front line service were used in escort roles in rear areas as well as in a variety of training and support roles. By the end of the war the surviving ships of both classes were worn out and a number were decommissioned and some scrapped even before the end of hostilities. Those that survived the war were all decommissioned by 1946 and most scrapped between 1945 and 1948.

During Second World War 9 of the Wickes Class were sunk in battle, and 7 were sunk or destroyed in other ways. 5 were later sunk as targets and the remaining ships were all scrapped. A total of 20 of the Clemson Class were lost either in battle or to other causes including those lost and Honda Point.

USS Peary Memorial

The brave Sailors that manned these ships in peace and war become fewer in number every day as the Greatest Generation passes. It is a sad testimony that none of these ships were preserved as a memorial however the Australians have a memorial at Darwin dedicated to the USS PearyDD-226 which was sunk with 80 of her crew during the Japanese raid on that city’s port on 19 February 1942. The memorial has one of her 4” guns pointed in the direction of the wreck of the Peary. A memorial to the USS Ward which showcases her #3 4” gun which sank the Japanese midget sub is located on the Capitol Grounds in St. Paul Minnesota.

The ships of the Wickes and Clemson classes were iconic, and their crews were heroic. Though none are left we should never forget the valiant service of these ships during both World Wars.


USS Boggs (DD-136/ DMS-3) - History

From: DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL FIGHTING SHIPS, Vol. I, p. 136.

Charles Stuart Boggs was born in New Brunswick, N. J., 28 January 1811. He was appointed a Midshipman in 1826. During the Mexican War he served in Princeton and during the Civil War, commanded Varuna in the Battle of New Orleans. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in 1870 and commanded the European Squadron in 1871. Rear Admiral Boggs retired in 1872 and died in Brunswick, N. J., in 1888.

(DD-136: dp. 1154 l. 314'5", b. 31'9" dr. 9', s. 35 k. cpl. 122 a. 4 4", 12 21" TT. c. Wickes )

Boggs (DD-136) was launched 25 April 1918 by Mare Island Navy Yard sponsored by Miss Ruth Hascal and commissioned 23 September 1918, Commander H. V. McKittrick in command.

Boggs departed San Diego in March 1919 for a six months cruise along the east coast, in the North Atlantic and in the Caribbean. Upon her return she served with the Pacific Fleet until placed out of commission 29 June 1922. Redesignated a miscellaneous auxiliary (AG-19) 5 September 1931, she was recommissioned 19 December 1931 and assigned to Mobile Target Division 1, Battle Force, for high-speed radio control tests, target towing and minesweeping. Except for a cruise to the east coast (January-October 1934) she served off the west coast until 1940. She arrived at Pearl Harbor 11 September 1940. Late in 1940 she was reclassified a high speed minesweeper (DMS-3).

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (7 December 1941) found Boggs at sea but she returned later in the day to sweep the approaches and anchorage. She remained at Pearl Harbor on minesweeping, patrol, and training duty until January 1943 when she made a run to Canton Island, Phoenix Islands with supplies. She returned to Pearl Harbor 2 March i943 and for the next year served in the vicinity as a patrol vessel, minesweeper, and towboat. She served as a target towing vessel with the Operational Training Command out of San Diego (12 April 1944-March 1945). Following overhaul at San Pedro, Calif. (March-June 1945) she was stripped of her sweeping gear and reclassified AG-19, 5 June 1945. Fitted for high-speed target towing Boggs arrived at Eniwetok, Marshall Islands, via Pearl Harbor, 15 August 1946. She remained at Eniwetok until 6 October 1945 and then returned to the United States, arriving in early 1946. Boggs was decommissioned 20 March 1946 and sold 27 November 1946.


Предвоенная война

Боггс отправился из Сан-Диего в марте 1919 года в шестимесячный круиз по восточному побережью США , Северной Атлантике и Карибскому морю . После возвращения она служила с ТОФ до помещения из комиссии 29 июня 1922 г. переименован разные вспомогательного (AG-19) по 5 сентябрю 1931 года она была вновь введена в эксплуатации 19 декабря 1931 и назначен Mobile Target Division 1 , Battle Force , для испытаний высокоскоростного радиоуправления, буксировки целей и траления мин . За исключением круиза на Восточное побережье США с января по октябрь 1934 года, он служил у западного побережья США до 1940 года. Он прибыл в Перл-Харбор 11 сентября 1940 года. В конце 1940 года он был реклассифицирован как высокоскоростной тральщик и получил новый классификационный знак корпуса DMS-3.

Вторая Мировая Война

Японская атака на Перл - Харбор 7 декабря 1941 года нашли Боггс в море, но позже она вернулась в тот же день подметать подходы и анкеровки. Она осталась на Перл - Харбор на траления, патруль , и обучение обязанности до января 1943 года , когда она сделала бежать Кантон острова , островов Феникс , с поставками. Она возвратилась в Перл-Харбор 2 марта 1943 года и в течение следующего года служила поблизости в качестве патрульного судна, тральщика и буксира. Она служила буксирным судном в Командовании оперативной подготовки из Сан-Диего (12 апреля 1944 г. - март 1945 г.).

После капитального ремонта в Сан-Педро, штат Калифорния , с марта по июнь 1945 года, с него сняли трамвайное снаряжение и 5 июня 1945 года он был реклассифицирован как AG-19. Приспособленный для высокоскоростной буксировки целей, Боггс прибыл в Эниветок , Маршалловы острова, через Перл-Харбор. 15 августа 1945 года. Она оставалась в Эниветоке до 6 октября 1945 года, а затем вернулась в Соединенные Штаты, прибыв в начале 1946 года. Boggs был выведен из эксплуатации 20 марта 1946 года и продан на металлолом 27 ноября 1946 года.


Watch the video: USS The Sullivans DD-537 is a Fletcher-class destroyer: A Closer look War Thunder Naval Forces (May 2022).


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