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British Parliament adopts the Coercive Acts in response to the Boston Tea Party

British Parliament adopts the Coercive Acts in response to the Boston Tea Party

Upset by the Boston Tea Party and other blatant acts of destruction of British property by American colonists, the British Parliament enacts the Coercive Acts, to the outrage of American Patriots, on March 28, 1774.

The Coercive Acts were a series of four acts established by the British government. The aim of the legislation was to restore order in Massachusetts and punish Bostonians for their Tea Party, in which members of the revolutionary-minded Sons of Liberty boarded three British tea ships in Boston Harbor and dumped 342 crates of tea—nearly $1 million worth in today’s money—into the water to protest the Tea Act.

Passed in response to the Americans’ disobedience, the Coercive Acts included:

The Boston Port Act, which closed the port of Boston until damages from the Boston Tea Party were paid.

The Massachusetts Government Act, which restricted Massachusetts; democratic town meetings and turned the governor’s council into an appointed body.

The Administration of Justice Act, which made British officials immune to criminal prosecution in Massachusetts.

The Quartering Act, which required colonists to house and quarter British troops on demand, including in their private homes as a last resort.

A fifth act, the Quebec Act, which extended freedom of worship to Catholics in Canada, as well as granting Canadians the continuation of their judicial system, was joined with the Coercive Acts in colonial parlance as one of the Intolerable Acts, as the mainly Protestant colonists did not look kindly on the ability of Catholics to worship freely on their borders.

More important than the acts themselves was the colonists’ response to the legislation. Parliament hoped that the acts would cut Boston and New England off from the rest of the colonies and prevent unified resistance to British rule. They expected the rest of the colonies to abandon Bostonians to British martial law. Instead, other colonies rushed to the city’s defense, sending supplies and forming their own Provincial Congresses to discuss British misrule and mobilize resistance to the crown. In September 1774, the First Continental Congress met in Philadelphia and began orchestrating a united resistance to British rule in America.

READ MORE: American Revolution: Causes and Timeline


CRISIS

John Adams to Abigail Adams, 7 October 1774 1

A delegate to the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia, John Adams described the frenzied proceedings to his wife, Abigail. "There is no idea of submission here in anybody's head," he affirmed, yet he feared the escalating fervor of the Congress would drive the colonies to premature and inconsidered war. But how were the colonies to resist submission and avoid war? Incensed to a new level by the Coercive Acts enacted to punish the colonies (especially Massachusetts) after the Boston Tea Party, the colonies had finally broken through the obstacles that blocked united action and sent delegates to the Continental Congress. Their charge: devise a united and fervent appeal to Britain, cement the fledgling entity they called the "united colonies," and avoid war. But soon after they began deliberations, news arrived&mdashsoon dispelled as rumor&mdashthat the British had bombarded Boston. "War! War! War!" the delegates yelled, as Adams relates. Was war now inevitable? Adams dreaded the thought: "let them avoid war, if possible, if possible." But first, let us review the acts deemed punitive and "intolerable" that brought delegates from twelve colonies to Philadelphia.

COERCIVE ACTS & QUEBEC ACT, 1774
Boston Port Act Closed the harbor of Boston to shipping until payment had been made for the tea destroyed in the Boston Tea Party. Brought economic hardship to merchants and all residents colonies organized relief campaigns as Boston's provisions dwindled.
Massachusetts
Government Act
Placed colony under direct British rule, with officials appointed by the king and the governor. Strictly limited powers of the colonial assembly and the town meetings.
Administration of Justice Act Permitted the trials of British officials accused of murdering colonists (and other capital offenses in the line of duty) to be sent to another colony or to Britain for trial in order to avoid juries of colonists.
Quartering Act Permitted governors to house British soldiers in unoccupied buildings owned by private citizens, with restitution.
Quebec Act Allowed the former French province to maintain French law and official religion (Roman Catholicism) extended boundaries to include the Ohio River Valley aggravated colonists' suspicions that Britain intended to surround and subjugate them.

As the delegates convened they were ripe to challenge not only the Coercive Acts but the very authority of Parliament to pass any laws for the colonies. They soon discovered, as historian Edmund Morgan points out, "how far they had travelled in the nine years since the Stamp Act Congress [when they] had agreed that Parliament had no right to tax Americans, but only the rashest proposed to set limits on its legislative authority. Now the question was whether Parliament had any authority in the colonies at all. Many Americans had arrived long since at the conclusion that it did not." 2

In these readings we consider where the colonies stood in late 1774 along the trajectory from 1763. War was imminent. There were regular face-offs between Americans and British troops, any of which could spark violence. The year ended with the first armed conflict between Americans and British troops (with no casualties) when American militiamen held off British guards while removing their colonial store of weapons from a British fort in New Hampshire. The pace of events would not subside for years.

Colonists respond to the Coercive Acts and the First Continental Congress, 1774. This compilation, one of a series in this Theme CRISIS, includes selections from news reports of public protests against the Coercive Acts, published debates between Patriots and Loyalists, clergymen's sermons for and against the justifiability of rebellion, the views of three Founding Fathers in letters to family and friends, the proceedings of the First Continental Congress, a Loyalist satire of the Congress, the perspective of Loyalist Peter Oliver in his 1781 history, and, as always, a retrospective view from the Patriot historian David Ramsay. As there is ample material for group study and presentation, the selections are designed to be divided among students and not assigned in their entirety. See Discussion Questions below and the Suggestions for Classroom Use of the compilations. (17 pp.)

Petition to King George III. Asserting that they had "no other motive than a dread of impending destruction," the delegates to the First Continental Congress petitioned King George III to (finally) give attention to their enumerated and long ignored grievances. Likening their treatment to slavery, and implying that the king must be horrified&mdashhorrified&mdashto learn of their base status under Parliament and his cabinet, they appeal for the return of rights guaranteed in their colonial charters. "Silence would be disloyalty," they assert, couching their petition as a sign of allegiance. Silence was the response they received. (3 pp.)

Bill of Rights: Letters to the American colonists & to the British people. In addition to their petition to King George, the delegates issued a Bill of Rights (as a set of resolutions) and published open letters "to the inhabitants of the Colonies" and "to the people of Great Britain" (note: not to the king, his cabinet ministers, or Parliament). How does the 1774 Bill of Rights compare with the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution ratified in 1791? What is the main message in each of the letters? Note how the first paragraphs of each letter are similar to those of the Declaration of Independence, issued two years later. Why do the delegates begin the letters with this statement of purpose? What consequences do they predict for Americans, and for the British, if their grievances are not addressed? (8 pp.)


In Response to What Did Parliament Pass the Intolerable Acts?

Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts, also known as the Coercive Acts, in response to the Boston Tea Party. The Boston Tea Party was the colonists' answer to the Tea Act of 1773, which allowed the British East India Company to sell tea directly to the colonists without having to pay the taxes that colonial tea merchants had to pay.

On December 16, 1773, about 150 colonists dressed up as Mohawk Indians and dumped tea taken from the British East India Company's ships into the Boston Harbor. Upon learning the identity of the responsible parties, King George III and Parliament demanded that the colonists pay the company for the wasted tea, but the colonists refused. To punish the colonists for their actions, Parliament established the Intolerable Acts, which included the Quartering Act, the Boston Port Bill, the Administration of Justice Act, the Massachusetts Government Act and the Quebec Act.

The Quartering Act required the colonists to provide lodging and supplies to British troops. The Boston Port Bill closed Boston Harbor until the colonists paid for the tea dumped into the harbor. The Administration of Justice Act allowed British officials to be extradited back to England, even if they had committed capital crimes in the colonies. The Massachusetts Government Act allowed the British governor, not the colonists, to control the town meetings. Finally, the Quebec Act extended Canada's borders to encompass western lands already claimed by the colonists. In September of 1774, the colonists met in Philadelphia in the First Continental Congress to discuss what they would do in response to the Intolerable Acts.


The British Side Response After The Boston Tea Party

In one simple sentence, the British authority went tougher to impose more dominating policies on the American colonists especially on Bostonians, Massachusetts.

After the Boston tea party, the British Parliament passed the Coercive Acts or Intolerable Acts in 1774.

The acts included 5 laws, which were fully against the American people’s interests.

Britishers actions through the acts came out something like this:

1. The very first among the five Intolerable Acts was the Boston Port Act (1774).

Under this law, the British Parliament closed all the trades that happened through the Boston harbor.

Their decision was – this port would remain closed until the colonists pay compensation to the East India Company for the loss during tea party.

Either way, parliament demanded colonists to say sorry to the English King George III for that sin.

The decision of the British parliament made the common citizens of Boston quite angry.

They rationalized, not all the people of Boston were involved during that incident.

So, punishing all was a quite unfair decision. They considered it as a big tregedy.

2. Under the Massachusetts Government Act 1774, English parliament fully abrogate the Massachusetts Charter of 1691.

The act tried to take away the rights of the local people in the participation of Massachusetts’ local governance system.

From now, the rule of the colony would be fully controlled by the British authority.

In Massachusetts, almost all important administrative positions would be appointed by the governor, parliament, or king of Great Britain.

Even, the law provided the royally appointed governor so much power that he could dissolve locally elected assembly without any difficulty and at any time.

The British authority’s main purpose through the law was to contain the growing unrest within the land segment of Boston.

British knew, if the unrest would spared to the other parts of the 13 colonies, then it would become difficult for them to calm it down again.

3. The British parliament re-imposed the Quartering Act to all the colonies.

Here colonists now required to provide British troops housing in their own private homes.

The American people were already against this law since the Quartering Act of 1765.

Therefore when they implemented again in 1774 they widely flared up against the British government.

4. Under the Administrative of Justice Act, they encouraged English royally appointed officials to commit crime in the colonies and run away to any other part of the British Empire.

Leaders like George Washington named it ‘Mudering Act’.

5. They also passed another act, named the ‘Quebec Act’.

Through the Quebec Act, they expanded the land area of Canada’s Quebec province towards the Midwest direction of present-day’s United States.

Under this law, the British tried increasing religious distances between Christian Catholics and other communities (mainly protestants).

These decisions of the British Government enraged the American colonists too much, which resulted in something like this:

Americans Response To The British’s Actions

Americans viewed the Intolerable Acts as a foe to their liberty and natural rights.

In response to the British’s actions, the year 1774 from September 5 to October 26 12 of the 13 colonies (Georgia didn’t participate) united in a meeting in Philadelphia.

In history, the meeting is popular as the ‘First Continental Congress’.

We can say, this meeting was the starting of the birth of the United States of America.

Here they took an important decision to impose an economic boycott on British trade.

And again, they decided that the boycott would remain until they repeal all the cruel acts (Intolerable acts).

But it made no effect on Britain.

Eventually, on April 19, 1775, the battles of Lexington and Concord kicked off the American revolutionary war.

In 1775 on May 10, all the 13 American colonies came together in the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

Here they took the decision to prepare for the Revolutionary war and get freedom from the British rule.

All 13 colonies decided that they would set up their own military and would try to get help from foreign countries.

Of course you know which were the foreign countries came further to help them?

Yes, they were France, Spain, and the Netherlands. Especially, France Empire played the main role here.

Finally, as a result, the 13 colonies declared independence on July 4th, 1776.

So, now I hope you have got your answer on what happened after the Boston Tea Party incident.


Boston Massacre. Conflicts between the British and the colonists had been on the rise because the British government had been trying to increase control over the colonies and raise taxes at the same time. The event in Boston helped to unite the colonies against Britain.

The trial of Captain Preston started almost 8 month after the incident and lasted for one week, from October 24, 1770 to October 30, 1770. The second trial was for the soldiers. It started almost one month after Preston’s aquital, on November 27, 1770 and ended on Dec 14, 1770.


Continental Congress, the central governing body of the American gathered from 5 September to 26 October 1774 to discuss possible responses to British actions that threatened their rights. In particular, they sought the repeal of Parliament's measures—commonly called the Coercive or Intolerable Acts—directed at Massachusetts following the BTP of 1773. Read more on Answers.Com

The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first battles of the American Revolutionary War. They were fought on April 19, 1775, in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy (Arlington), and Cambridge, near Boston. Wikipedia has an excellent summary of these events.


What was Britain's reaction to the Boston Tea Party?

The passage of the Intolerable Acts in 1774, formerly known as the Coercive Acts.

Explanation:

The Tea Party angered the British, and in retaliation and to suppress the uprising further, Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts in 1774 which included

  • Boston Port Act
  • Quartering Act
  • Massachusetts Government Act
  • Administration of Justice Act

In order to pay back the British for the destroyed tea, the colonists were restricted to use of the Boston Port through the Port Act until the colonists were able to pay back the money that was lost - roughly today's equivalent of $1.4 million.

The Quartering Act allowed for British troops to be stationed in unoccupied buildings throughout the colonies. Prior to the Boston Party, this act had been implemented, but colonial forces refused to cooperate. However, this time it was more harshly enforced.

The Massachusetts Government Act limited colonial power in the Massachusetts government. This act brought the most outrage as the British resent the Massachusetts charter and brought it under British rule. It limited town hall meetings to once a year locally, and struck fear in other colonies' governments.

The Administration of Justice Act authorized court cases and legal affairs of British loyalists and officers to be tried back home in Britain for their crimes in the colonies. This put the British at an advantage as the punishments for British officers in Britain was much kinder, even too kind, back home. George Washington referred to this act as the "Murder Act" because it allowed British military officers to harass Americans and then escape justice.


British Parliament adopts the Coercive Acts in response to the Boston Tea Party

Lt Col Charlie Brown

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/british-parliament-adopts-the-coercive-acts?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2021-0 [login to see] 1&om_rid=
Upset by the Boston Tea Party and other blatant acts of destruction of British property by American colonists, the British Parliament enacts the Coercive Acts, to the outrage of American Patriots, on March 28, 1774.

The Coercive Acts were a series of four acts established by the British government. The aim of the legislation was to restore order in Massachusetts and punish Bostonians for their Tea Party, in which members of the revolutionary-minded Sons of Liberty boarded three British tea ships in Boston Harbor and dumped 342 crates of tea—nearly $1 million worth in today’s money—into the water to protest the Tea Act.

Passed in response to the Americans’ disobedience, the Coercive Acts included:

The Boston Port Act, which closed the port of Boston until damages from the Boston Tea Party were paid.

The Massachusetts Government Act, which restricted Massachusetts democratic town meetings and turned the governor’s council into an appointed body.

The Administration of Justice Act, which made British officials immune to criminal prosecution in Massachusetts.

The Quartering Act, which required colonists to house and quarter British troops on demand, including in their private homes as a last resort.

A fifth act, the Quebec Act, which extended freedom of worship to Catholics in Canada, as well as granting Canadians the continuation of their judicial system, was joined with the Coercive Acts in colonial parlance as one of the Intolerable Acts, as the mainly Protestant colonists did not look kindly on the ability of Catholics to worship freely on their borders.

More important than the acts themselves was the colonists’ response to the legislation. Parliament hoped that the acts would cut Boston and New England off from the rest of the colonies and prevent unified resistance to British rule. They expected the rest of the colonies to abandon Bostonians to British martial law. Instead, other colonies rushed to the city’s defense, sending supplies and forming their own Provincial Congresses to discuss British misrule and mobilize resistance to the crown. In September 1774, the First Continental Congress met in Philadelphia and began orchestrating a united resistance to British rule in America.


Britain passes the Coercive Acts they should be called the Intolerable Acts

Editor's note: In order to allow our staff to enjoy the 4th of July holiday with their families, TheBlaze will be running a series of articles today commemorating the Revolutionary War, which won America her freedom. God bless America, and all of you.

LONDON (1774) — In response to the activities of Dec. 16, 1773, the British Parliament has passed a series of punitive acts to be revoked only upon the compensation of the East India Company for goods that were allegedly irreparably damaged by American colonists.

The harsh legislation began after a group calling themselves the Sons of Liberty deposited nearly 350 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest the Tea Act. The legislation closed the port of Boston, appointed a new military government under Gen. Thomas Gage, and rendered British soldiers immune from prosecution for criminal violations.

In keeping with the Boston Port Act, the British Navy plans to establish a blockade of Massachusetts Bay until the town's unruly residents agree to pay for the tea that was dumped into Boston Harbor in protest. The Massachusetts Government Act has likewise established martial law and curbed the rights of rebellious colonists to gather into groups.

The so-called Administration of Justice Act, passed on May 20, was the final blow in a succession of punishments meted out to the province of Massachusetts, which has been the focal point of American hostility toward the mother country. It renewed the ability British troops exercised under the expired Quartering Act to take residence in unoccupied buildings at the will of the colonial governor.

Parliament continues debate on the Quebec Act, which would allow the French of that region to be governed by the Roman Catholic church and extend its territory into colonial western claims. Under this act, colonists in Boston and the Massachusetts Bay area would not be permitted to govern themselves, and would be cut off from their own independent trade by the British Navy, forcing them to rely on surrounding colonies for food and supplies.

The Quebec Act would punish the citizens of Massachusetts by allowing the French of Quebec to be subject to their own civil laws while Massachusetts would remain under the firm grip of the British Parliament.

Meanwhile, Boston merchants will soon be unable to trade goods because the British will occupy the harbor. Parliament still expects the East India Company to be repaid in full.

A small minority in Parliament, led by Edmund Burke, has begun to speak out against Parliament's treatment of the colonies. In a recent speech, Burke claimed that these Coercive Acts would make British rule intolerable to the American colonies, and might lead to future military conflict and war.

Burke warned that colonists outside of Massachusetts might sympathize with their plight and would likewise fear that Britain would soon intend to meddle in their affairs in a similar manner. Burke offered an impassioned speech in Parliament in favor of a motion to repeal the Tea Tax outright, but the motion was easily defeated in spite of Burke's protests.

It has been suggested in a variety of writings that an inter-colonial conference of some kind be convened to discuss the implications of Parliament's actions for all of the American colonies. One may take place as early as this autumn, though some colonies as yet remain mostly uninterested.


On this day in 1774

On this day in 1774, upset by the Boston Tea Party and other blatant acts of destruction of British property by American colonists, the British Parliament enacts the Coercive Acts, to the outrage of American Patriots.

The Coercive Acts were a series of four acts established by the British government. The aim of the legislation was to restore order in Massachusetts and punish Bostonians for their Tea Party, in which members of the revolutionary-minded Sons of Liberty boarded three British tea ships in Boston Harbor and dumped 342 crates of tea—nearly $1 million worth in today’s money—into the water to protest the Tea Act.

Passed in response to the Americans’ disobedience, the Coercive Acts included:

The Boston Port Act, which closed the port of Boston until damages from the Boston Tea Party were paid.

The Massachusetts Government Act, which restricted Massachusetts democratic town meetings and turned the governor’s council into an appointed body.

The Administration of Justice Act, which made British officials immune to criminal prosecution in Massachusetts.

The Quartering Act, which required colonists to house and quarter British troops on demand, including in their private homes as a last resort.

A fifth act, the Quebec Act, which extended freedom of worship to Catholics in Canada, as well as granting Canadians the continuation of their judicial system, was joined with the Coercive Acts in colonial parlance as one of the Intolerable Acts, as the mainly Protestant colonists did not look kindly on the ability of Catholics to worship freely on their borders.

More important than the acts themselves was the colonists’ response to the legislation. Parliament hoped that the acts would cut Boston and New England off from the rest of the colonies and prevent unified resistance to British rule. They expected the rest of the colonies to abandon Bostonians to British martial law. Instead, other colonies rushed to the city’s defense, sending supplies and forming their own Provincial Congresses to discuss British misrule and mobilize resistance to the crown. In September 1774, the First Continental Congress met in Philadelphia and began orchestrating a united resistance to British rule in America.


Watch the video: The Intolerable Acts (January 2022).