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Elmer Rice

Elmer Rice

Elmer Leopold Reizenstein (later changed to Rice) was born at 127 East Ninetieth Street in New York City on 28th September 1892. His grandfather had taken part in the failed 1848 Revolution in Germany. He emigrated to the United States and became a successful businessman although he continued to hold radical political opinions.

In 1893 the family moved to a large new flat on Madison Avenue. His grandfather, who was a staunch atheist, greatly influenced Rice who refused to attend Hebrew school or to have a Bar Mitzvah. He was also an avid reader. He later recalled: "Nothing in my life has been more helpful than the simple act of joining the library." During this period he a became a pacifist.

Rice graduated from New York Law School in 1912 and became a lawyer. He soon became disillusioned with his profession, and hoped to have a career as a playwright. His first play, On Trial (1914) was a tremendous success and ran for 365 performances in its first run in New York City. It also became a movie in 1917. It has been estimated that the play earned Rice over $100,000.

His next major play, The Adding Machine, was first performed on 19th March 1923 at the Garrick Theatre and starred Dudley Digges, Edward G. Robinson, Elise Bartlett, Louis Calvert, Margaret Wycherly and Louise Sydmeth. The story concerns an accountant who is replaced by an adding machine. As the author later explained: "In eight scenes it told the story of Mr. Zero, a white-collar worker tied to a monotonous job and a shrewish wife. Replaced by a machine, he murders his boss in an access of resentment and panic, and he is condemned to die by a jury of his peers." It was well-received by the critics. Alexander Woollcott said it was "a play worth seeing" whereas Franklin Pierce Adams found it "deeply interesting". Heywood Broun added: "For the first time in our theatrical experience, expressionism has come over the footlights to us an effective theatrical device." It was liked less by the public and it only ran for 72 performances.

The following year Rice was approached by Philip Goodman who told him that Dorothy Parker had submitted a play called Close Harmony. Goodman asked Rice if he was willing to work with Parker on the play. He recalled in an autobiography, Minority Report (1964): "Dorothy Parker had written a first act which Goodman felt had great promise but lacked theatrical craftsmanship... The characters, suburbanites all, just went on talking and talking. But they were sharply realized, and the dialogue was uncannily authentic and very funny. Since I have always enjoyed the technical side of playwriting, I agreed to Goodman's proposal; not without some misgiving, however, for, though I had never met Dorothy, I had heard tales about her temperament and undependability." Parker was thrilled when she heard that Rice had accepted the job: "I felt so proud.... I was just trembling all the time because Elmer Rice had done so many good things."

Rice was surprised by Parker's professionalism: "To my relief, everything went smoothly. She was punctual, diligent and amiable; no collaboration could have been less painful.... we had a good work routine. Every few days we went over what she had written, line by line, pruning out irrelevancies and reorganizing. Then we discussed the next scene in minute detail, and she went off to write it. She was unfailingly courteous, considerate and, of course, amusing and stimulating. It was hard to believe that this tiny creature with the big, appealing eyes and the diffident, self-effacing manner was capable of corrosive cynicism and devastating retorts. I discovered that in the granite of her misanthropy there was a vein of softish sentimentally. Our relationship was cordial and easygoing, but entirely impersonal."

According to Marion Meade, the author of Dorothy Parker: What Fresh Hell is This? (1989) Parker actually began an affair with Rice while writing the play: "Dorothy was not particularly attracted to Rice physically because he was not her type. She preferred tall, slim, cinematically beautiful blonds. Rice was a dour sex-foot, red-haired, bespectacled Jew... Against her inclination and better judgment, she finally went to bed with him, but it was one of those cases in which she realized her mistake at once. They were far less compatible sexually than artistically. Dorothy got little pleasure from their several encounters... Once having begun the affair, the problem became delicate: how to end it without wounding his feelings or, far more important, without jeopardizing her play."

Close Harmony opened at the Gaiety Theatre on 1st December, 1924 and ran for only 24 performances. During its three-week run the total receipts were less than $10,000. The rental charge on the theatre was over $4,000 a week and the producers lost a significant sum on the play. Ring Lardner wrote to Scott Fitzgerald saying that it received great reviews but still failed to attract audiences. Rice wrote that its failure was "inexplicable". It did much better on tour and played fifteen weeks in Chicago and another ten in smaller Midwestern cities.

Rice also wrote Street Scene (1929), a play about life in the slums, it won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It was a great success and ran for a total of 601 performances. It was later turned into a film that starred Estelle Taylor, David Landau and Sylvia Sidney. Other plays by Rice included The Subway (1929), See Naples and Die (1930) and Counsellor-at-Law (1931), a play about the legal profession.

In April 1932, Rice visited Germany where he heard both Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels address public meetings. Horrified by the anti-Semitism of the Nazi Party, Rice wrote the anti-fascist, We, the People (1933). Judgement Day dealt with the controversial subject of the Reichstag Fire. Rice was also highly critical of the failings of capitalism and this was reflected in his play, Between Two Worlds (1934).

Rice's political plays were not popular with the American public and he was unable the recapture the success of his early plays. Robert Vaughn has pointed out: "According to Rice, the theater was in the hands of businessmen, real-estate operators, and capitalists, where primary artistic interest dealt with the dollar sign. In his purview, the drama and commerce were as one and the artist and his audience were estranged by crass commercialism." Rice argued in the New York Times on 11th November, 1934 that the capitalist system "stifles the creative impulse and dams the free flow of vitality."

The Works Projects Administration (WPA) was established by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935 as part of the New Deal attempt to combat the Depression. This included the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), an attempt to offer work to theatrical professionals. Harry Hopkins, hoped it would also provide "free, adult, uncensored theatre" and suggested that Roosevelt should appoint Hallie Flanagan as its national director.

Elmer Rice was placed in charge of the Federal Theatre Project in New York City. In 1936 alone, the FTP employed 5,385 people in the city. Over a three year period over 12 million people attended performances in the city. One of Rice's innovations was the Living Newspaper (plays which were essentially theatrical documentaries). The first of these plays, Ethiopia , which dealt with Mussolini's invasion of the country, was banned by Harry Hopkins. As a result Rice resigned from the FTP.

Martin Dies, the chairman of the Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), accused Rice of being a communist. In his book, The Trojan Horse in America, he argued: "Works Projects Administration was the greatest financial boon which ever came to the Communists in the United States. Stalin could not have done better by his American friends and agents.... In one Federal Writers' Project in New York, one third of the writers were members of the Communist Party. This was proven by their own signatures. Many witnesses have testified that it was necessary for W.P.A. workers to join the Workers Alliance - high-pressure lobby run by the Communist Party - in order to get or retain their jobs.... Several hundred Communists held advisory or administrative positions in the W.P.A. projects."

Other plays by Rice included Flight to the West (1941), The Talley Method (1941), A New Life (1944), Dream Girl (1946), The Grand Tour (1952), The Winner (1954) and Cue for Passion (1959). He was also the author of a controversial book on American drama, The Living Theatre (1960) and an autobiography, Minority Report (1964). His last produced play was Court of Last Resort (1965).

Rice was married to Hazel Levy (1915-42) and Betty Field (1942-56). He married his third wife, Barbara and moved to a large estate on Long Ridge Road in Stamford, Connecticut. Rive was the father of ten children.

Elmer died while on holiday in Southampton on 8th May, 1967.

Another playwright, Elmer Rice, made his most serious commitment to the drama of protest in the early thirties, at the height of the Depression, when he, "like many liberals, allied himself with the radicals as a gesture of protest against the social chaos" and condemned the Broadway theater in a manner that Martin Dies would have probably considered a Marxian dialectic.

Dorothy Parker had written a first act which Goodman felt had great promise but lacked theatrical craftsmanship... Since I have always enjoyed the technical side of playwriting, I agreed to Goodman's proposal; not without some misgiving, however, for, though I had never met Dorothy, I had heard tales about her temperament and undependability.

Dorothy was not particularly attracted to Rice physically because he was not her type. Once having begun the affair, the problem became delicate: how to end it without wounding his feelings or, far more important, without jeopardizing her play.

Works Projects Administration (WPA) was the greatest financial boon which ever came to the Communists in the United States. Stalin could not have done better by his American friends and agents. Relief projects swarmed with Communists - Communists who were not only recipients of needed relief but who were entrusted by New Deal officials with high administrative positions in the projects. projects.

The idea of the Playwrights' Company had germinated in Bob's mind for some time, but it became urgent to him in December 1937, directly afrer a particularly trying Dramatisrs Guild meeting. Elmer Rice remembered that rhe discussion during this "griping session" led Bob and Maxwell Anderson to speak out "vehemendy of their disenchantment with Broadway producers, parricularly the Theatre Guild, which had presented many of their plays. They were harassed by disagreements about casting, revisions, and the disposition of subsidiary rights." They were also tired of the constant interference. After the meeting, Bob invited Rice and Anderson to have a drink at rhe nearby Whaler's Bar on Madison Avenue and Thirty-eighth Street. There the conversation turned to the idea of producing their own plays. The three knew that efforts had been made in the earlier part of the decade to establish just such an enterprise; in fact, Bob and Anderson had participated in one advisory group organized by producer Arthur Hopkins. The Dramatists' Theater and the New Playwrights had also been established, but none of the attempts had succeeded. This time, however, they were sure that things would be different.

Bob, Anderson, and Rice decided to invite two other playwrights into their scheme. The firsr was Bob's good friend Sidney Howard, who in turn approached S. N. Behrman, who at first was "bowled" over by it "I was flabbergasred," he later wrote, by the thought of leaving the Theatre Guild, its securiry, and all the friends he had there. "I just didn't know what to say." Still, Behrman made an appointment to meet with Bob. "I was overwhclmed by rhe intensiry of his feeling about it. "It was as if it mattered to him more than anything else in the world," he wrote. Bob was "voluble and bitter" in describing his relationship with the Theatre Guild, grievances that seemed minor to Behrman, "trivialities that tear people apart for a few hours during rehearsals and are forgorren the next day." He realized that there was something else operating in Bob's desire to form the Playwrights Producing Company, some "fundamental impulse for self-assertion." With much encouragement, Behrman signed on, later recalling, "Who was l to resist a man so eminent and lovable as Bob S.herwood?"


History

The Los Poblanos land was originally inhabited by the Ancestral Pueblo Indians in the 14th century. Many of the original settlers in this area were thought to have come from Puebla, Mexico, a citizen of which is called a &ldquoPoblano.&rdquo The land became part of the Elena Gallegos land grant around 1716. The original ranch land was owned by Ambrosio and Juan Cristobal Armijo through the 19th century but was reassembled by Albert and Ruth Simms in the 1930s. Los Poblanos today encompasses the original headquarters of the 800-acre ranch that extended to the crest of the Sandia Mountains, owned by Albert Simms and Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms. Our historic inn was their private residence and the center of operations of their dairy, farming, nursery, art businesses and dynamic cultural and educational endeavors. In 1932, Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms commissioned architect John Gaw Meem and numerous WPA artists and craftsmen to renovate the ranch house and create the La Quinta Cultural Center for political and community events and recreation with gardens designed by Rose Greely.


Elmer Rice American Writer

According to our records, Elmer Rice is possibly single.

Relationships

Elmer Rice was previously married to Betty Field.

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Details

First Name Elmer
Last Name Rice
Full Name at Birth Elmer Leopold Reizenstein
Alternative Name Elmer L. Reizenstein, Elmer Rice, Elmer Leopold Reizenstein
Age 74 (age at death) years
Birthday 28th September, 1892
Birthplace New York City, New York, USA
Died 8th May, 1967
Place of Death Southampton, Hampshire, England, UK
Build Average
Eye Color Brown - Dark
Hair Color Brown - Dark
Zodiac Sign Libra
Ethnicity White
Nationality American
Occupation Text Playwright
Occupation Writer

Elmer Rice (born Elmer Leopold Reizenstein, September 28, 1892 – May 8, 1967) was an American playwright. He is best known for his plays The Adding Machine (1923) and his Pulitzer Prize-winning drama of New York tenement life, Street Scene (1929).


Elmer Rice

(1892–1967). U.S. playwright, director and novelist Elmer Rice was noted for his innovative and controversial plays. His most important play, Street Scene (1929), was a starkly realistic tragedy set outside a New York City slum tenement building. The play won a Pulitzer Prize and was adapted into a highly successful film (1931) directed by King Vidor and a musical (1947) with lyrics by Langston Hughes and music by Kurt Weill.

Elmer Rice was born Elmer Reizenstein on September 28, 1892, in New York City. He graduated from the New York Law School in 1912 but soon turned to writing plays. His first work, the melodramatic On Trial (1914), was the first play to employ on stage the motion-picture technique of flashbacks, in this case to present the recollections of witnesses at a trial. In The Adding Machine (1923) Rice adapted techniques from German Expressionist theater to depict the dehumanization of man in the 20th century. Rice followed his successful Street Scene with Counsellor-at-Law (1931) a rather critical look at the legal profession. In We, the People (1933), Judgment Day (1934), and several other socially conscious plays of the 1930s, Rice treated the evils of Nazism, the poverty of the Great Depression, and racism. He also wrote several novels and an autobiography, entitled Minority Report (1963). Rice died on May 8, 1967, in Southampton, Hampshire, England.


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Working on Rice Family around Washington County MD, into PA and WV. There is quite a few. I am trying to connect families.

Looking for a Daniel Rice b 1807 Washington County, MD Buried in Boonsboro MD

Anyone know his family, I have some going forward but would like to see his ancestors.

My 3rd great-grandparents were Thomas Manson Rice, B: NOV 1828, Virginia, D: AFT 14 JUN 1900, Whitley, Kentucky and his wife Mary Elizabeth Pruitt, B: MAY 1830, Virginia, D: Unknown. I think his parents were Charles Rice, Birth 1789, Hawkins, Tennessee, D: 21 NOV 1862, Opossum Creek, Scott County, Virginia and his wife Mary B Rice, B: 1795, Virginia, D: 1865, Estellville, Scott, Virginia. I manage 8 DNA kits from this line on 23&Me, ftdna, Ancestry, My Heritage, and gedmatch.com. This is 1 of my several brick walls, any help researching my Rice Line would be appreciated getting this sorted out.

Ezekiel L Rice (1777-1862) DNA indicates is my 4th Gerat Grandfather and most family documents indicate that's true. Going up the chain thru Ancestry is the following: James W. Rice (1752)1827-Dlinor, James Rice (1724-1844-Mary Branhan, John Rice (1698-1769)-Mary Higgerson and Thomas Rice 1660-1711.

Can anyone help with support on this?

I am a direct descendent of Deacon Edmund Rice down 11 generations. Generation 5 is Barzillai Rice. He had a son Reuben born Sept. 3, 1776 at Dummerston, VT. Reuben married Polly Jones 1796 and left her with a son in about 1798. What I would like to know is where he went and is buried. Any hints or help would be appreciated.

I'm looking for connections related to Thomas Rice around Loudoun County Virginia. Thomas was born 1779 with the following children

Rebecah 8 Jul 1801
Nancy 18 Jan 1803
Lusanada 21 Jan 1805
Maryann 17 Sep 1806
Catherine 27 Jul 1808
Elizabeth 11 May 1810
Thomas 1 Mar 1812
Perry Thomas 16 Sep 1826
James William 22 Mar 1828
Margaret 6 Nov 1830

I'm from Perry Thomas Rice line who moved from Virginia to a little town in western Maryland (Mt. Savage). I have done DNA tests via FTDNA and am part of the Rice project (Edmond Rice).

I have linked/matched with some from that project but we can't seem to make a direct connection.

Any help would be appreciated.

Hello, I also have Rice ancestors in Kentucky. My ancestor is Mary Moore Rice, who married Leander Bradshaw in Oldham Co, KY, in 1839. Mary's father was Rev. Thomas Moore Rice, and her mother was Betsy Bain. Parents of Thomas were Samuel Rice and Mary Moore.

Hello, I am researching the Hezekiah Rice family that apparently started out in VA, spent some time in NC, and ended up in Union County SC. A lot of information in the DAR records are coming to light as incorrect, and I'm trying to find truth (or at least facts. haha!) and yes, there were at *least* three Hezekiah Rice's out there, and I'm sure there are more. Any help is appreciated, and if you are interested in what I have found, please reply.

I am in search of my grandfather- Thomas R Rice (b 1940) to Joseph R Rice and Helen (surname unknown). RUMORED to have passed in Alaska at the age of 26 though there are no records to verify this. Married at one time to Charlene M Brady.

Hi, I am researching my Rice Line William Rice b. abt 1823 in Ky he married Mary " Polly " Osborne some of their Children is Nelson T ( Tatum) Rice was in the 14th Ky Infantry Thomas Rice , Walter (Campbell, camel , cam ) Rice ( my 2nd great grandfather) married Melvina "Vinnie" Griffith . Charles W Rice b 1850 d 1875 consumption. Chilton Scott Rice married Emily Boggs ( was a doctor moved to Kansas or Nebraska, Fleming Rice married Mildred ? was said to moved to Canada. There is a lot of mysteries concerning William some said he changed his name from Gollihue to Rice and that he was the Illegitament son of a rich Rice man and an Indentured servant girl with the last name Golihu golihue . some have even said he is the son of Campbell Rice b, powahtan co Va and Elizabeth Bailey Tatum Rice b va but he already has a son named William this has been my thorn along with other Rice mysteries. Thanks

Looking for information on Rice family from Minnesota. My grandfather was Elmer James Rice (born James Elmer Rice) born August 27, 1890. He was the son of Obadiah Henry Rice and Caroline (Carrie) Rice. She was a Thompson. He married Esther Ostlund and had a son named Raymond that died young. His siblings were Roy, Clarence, Josie and Laura. Any information about his life and family would be appreciated.


--> Rice, Elmer, 1892-1967

Dramatist Elmer Rice was born and raised in Manhattan. Working as a file clerk, he earned a high-school equivalency diploma and entered New York Law School, passing the bar exam. He quit his job with a law firm to write plays, and within eight months his play On Trial was a critical and popular success. In a career marked by success and innovation, the prolific Rice produced socially-conscious drama as well as accessible entertainment he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1929 for Street Scene. He directed many of his plays, and also wrote screenplays and stories. He was a founding member of the American Civil Liberties Union, opposed censorship, and worked for social issues such women's suffrage and child labor laws.

From the description of Elmer Rice letter to Mrs. Brennan, 1941 April 15. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 62171655

American dramatist and lawyer, Rice won the Pulitzer Prize in 1929 for his play, Street Scene. His plays often reflected the social/political issues of their day.

From the description of Elmer Rice letters from various correspondents, 1915-1967. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612378035

An American dramatist and lawyer, Rice won the Pulitzer Prize in 1929 for his play, Street scene. His plays often reflected the social and political issues of their day.

From the guide to the Elmer Rice letters from various correspondents, 1915-1967., (Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

From the description of Typed letter signed : New York, addressed "Dear Sirs" and directed to the Pierpont Morgan Library, 1957 Jan. 23. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270617372

Elmer Rice (1892-1967), born Elmer L. Reizenstein, was an early 20th century American playwright. Among his works are On Trial (1914), The Adding Machine (1923), The Left Bank (1931), Judgement Day (1934), and Dream Girl (1945). His 1929 play Street Scene won him a Pulitzer Prize.

Rice helped establish and wrote for Playwrights' Producing Company and was the first director of the New York office of the Federal Theatre Project, a post he resigned in 1936 in protest of alleged government censorship of the FTP's Ethiopia, a "Living Newspaper" concerning Mussolini's invasion of Ethiopia.

In addition to writing for the stage, Rice authored The Living Theatre (1960), a controversial book on American drama, and his autobiography, Minority Report, was published in 1964.

From the guide to the Elmer Rice Letters, 1932, 1951, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)


Elmer Rice

Elmer Rice (alkujaan Elmer Leopold Reizenstein, 28. syyskuuta 1892 New York – 8. toukokuuta 1967 Southampton, Englanti) oli yhdysvaltalainen näytelmäkirjailija, teatteriohjaaja ja elokuvakäsikirjoittaja. Hänet tunnetaan parhaiten näytelmästään The Adding Machine (1923, suom. Laskukone) ja New Yorkin vuokrataloelämää kuvaavasta Pulitzer-palkitusta näytelmästä Street Scene (1929, suom. Katu). [1]

Ricen isoisä oli ollut poliittinen aktivisti Saksassa Euroopan hullun vuoden 1848 levottomuuksissa. Niiden jälkeen hän lähti siirtolaiseksi Yhdysvaltoihin, ryhtyi liikemieheksi ja vietti eläkepäiviään Elmer Ricen kodissa. Pojasta ja isoisästä tuli toisilleen hyvin läheiset, ja Elmer Rice omaksui isoisänsä liberaaleja, ateistisia ja pasifistisia aatteita ja kieltäytyi muun muassa juutalaispoikien perinteisestä bar mitsvasta. Myös isän veli asui taloudessa ja tuli hyvin toimeen Elmer-pojan kanssa. Isäänsä Elmer Ricella oli sen sijaan etäisempi suhde. [2] Poika luki paljon ja onkin sanonut, ettei mikään ole ollut hänen elämässään ratkaisevampaa kuin kirjastokortin hankinta. [3]

Isän sairastuttua Elmer joutui jättämään high schoolin kesken, mutta opiskeli itsenäisesti ja pääsi opiskelemaan oikeustiedettä. Hän ei pitänyt siitä mutta valmistui kuitenkin ja toimi pari vuotta lakimiehenä. [4] Oikeussalidraamoista tulikin Ricen erikoisala näytelmäkirjailijana, ja muissakin hänen teoksissaan ilmenee kyyninen asenne lainkäyttäjiä kohtaan.

Fred Harrisin kanssa kirjoitettu murhamelodraama On Trial on ilmeisesti ensimmäinen amerikkalaisnäytelmä, joka käyttää käänteistä kronologiaa: tapahtumat etenevät siinä lopusta alkuun. Näytelmästä tuli menestys useissa maissa, ja se sovitettiin elokuvaksi vuosina 1917, 1928 ja 1939.

Ricen neljä seuraavaa näytelmää eivät menestyneet mainittavasti, mutta vuonna 1923 kantaesitetty, rohkean ekspressionistinen, parissa viikossa kirjoitettu The Adding Machine onnistui erinomaisesti. [5] Siinä tylsä kirjanpitäjä Mr. Zero huomaa tulevansa korvatuksi laskukoneella, tulee hulluksi ja tappaa esimiehensä. Hän pääsee taivaaseen vain huomatakseen, että hänet todetaan sielläkin turhaksi taivaan organisaatiossa ja lähetetään takaisin maan päälle. [6] [7] Philip Moellerin ohjaaman alkuperäistuotannon rooleissa nähtiin Dudley Digges ja Edward G. Robinson. [8] Vuonna 2007 yli 80-vuotiaasta näytelmästä tehtiin off-Broadway-musikaali The Adding Machine.

1920- ja 1930-luvuilla Rice oli erittäin tuottelias kirjoittaja, joka yhä useammin myös tuotti ja ohjasi omat näytelmänsä. Hän jopa osti käyttöönsä oman näyttämön, Broadwayn maineikkaan Belasco-teatterin. Hänen seuraava menestysnäytelmänsä oli vuoden 1929 Street Scene, jonka Kurt Weill sävelsi myöhemmin oopperaksi. Näytelmä kuvaa vuokrataloa, jonka asukkaat ovat paenneet hellettä ulos kadulle tai avoimien ikkunoidensa ääreen, joista keskustelevat naapureidensa kanssa. [9] Muun muassa ohjaaja George Cukor hylkäsi sen mahdottomana toteuttaa, ja Rice päättikin ohjata teoksen itse. [10] Tuotanto sai Pulitzer-palkinnon. [1] King Vidor ohjasi sen pohjalta elokuvan Katukuvia (1931). [11]

Ricen näytelmiä 1930-luvulla olivat The Left Bank (1931), komedia amerikkalaisesta materialismia paossa Pariisissa, ja realistinen lakimieskuvaus Counsellor-at-Law (1931). [12] Samalla vuosikymmenellä Rice kirjoitti myös kaksi romaania ja toimi menestyksellä Hollywood-käsikirjoittajana, vaikka monet elokuvamogulit pitivät häntä yhtenä ”niistä itärannikon vasemmistolaisista”. [13]

1930-luvun lamasta kertova, kapitalisminvastainen We, the People (1933, suom. Me kansa) oli Ricelle itselleen tärkeä tuotanto mutta sai huonot arvostelut. [14] Vuonna 1932 Rice teki matkan Neuvostoliittoon ja Saksaan, jossa kuuli Hitlerin and Göbbelsin puhuvan. Matka tuotti materiaalia hänen seuraaviin teoksiinsa Judgement Day (1934, suom. Tuomionpäivä) ja Between Two Worlds (1934). Molemmat näytelmät menestyivät huonosti, ja Rice palasi 1937 Broadwaylle kirjoittamaan ja ohjaamaan näytelmiä uudelle Playwrights' Producing Companylle, jonka hän oli perustanut Maxwell Andersonin, S. N. Behrmanin, Sidney Howardin ja Robert E. Sherwoodin kanssa. Ricen myöhemmistä näytelmistä menestynein oli Dream Girl (1945). Ricen viimeiseksi näytelmäksi jäi Cue for Passion (1958), moderni psykoanalyyttinen muunnelma Hamlet-tarinasta. Eläkevuosinaan Rice kirjoitti ristiriitaisen vastaanoton saaneen teoksen Yhdysvaltain teatterielämästä The Living Theatre (1960) sekä seikkaperäisen omaelämäkerran Minority Report (1964).

Rice oli naimisissa 1915–1942 Hazel Levyn kanssa, ja he saivat kaksi lasta. Ricen toinen vaimo oli näyttelijä Betty Field, jonka kanssa hän ehti saada kolme lasta ennen heidän eroaan 1956. Rice asui loppuvuosinaan Stamfordissa Connecticutin osavaltiossa. Hän kuoli ollessaan matkalla Englannissa kolmannen vaimonsa Barbaran kanssa 1967.

Menestysnäytelmillään ja -käsikirjoituksillaan ansaitsemillaan varoilla Rice muun muassa keräsi merkittävän taidekokoelman, jonka nimiin kuuluivat Picasso, Braque, Rouault, Léger, Klee ja Modigliani. [15]


Rice History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The origins of the Welsh name Rice go back to those ancient Celts known as the Britons that once occupied the hills and Moors of Wales. This old Welsh surname is from the Welsh personal name Rhys, which also took the forms Rice and Rees. This name was originally derived from the Old Welsh forename Ris, which means ardour.

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Early Origins of the Rice family

The surname Rice was first found in Carmarthenshire (Welsh: Sir Gaerfyrddin), located in Southwest Wales, one of thirteen historic counties and presently one of the principal area in Wales, where they held a family seat from very early times.

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Early History of the Rice family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rice research. Another 115 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1548, 1579, 1637, 1715 and are included under the topic Early Rice History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Rice Spelling Variations

Compared to other ancient cultures found in the British Isles, the number of Welsh surnames are relatively few, but there are an inordinately large number of spelling variations. These spelling variations began almost as soon as surname usage became common. People could not specify how to spell their own names leaving the specific recording up to the individual scribe or priest. Those recorders would then spell the names as they heard them, causing many different variations. Later, many Welsh names were recorded in English. This transliteration process was extremely imprecise since the Brythonic Celtic language of the Welsh used many sounds the English language was not accustomed to. Finally, some variations occurred by the individual's design: a branch loyalty within a family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations were indicated by spelling variations of one's name. The Rice name over the years has been spelled Rice, Rees, Rhys and others.

Early Notables of the Rice family (pre 1700)

Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Rice Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Rice family to Ireland

Some of the Rice family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 110 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Rice migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Rice Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Henry Rice who settled in Virginia in 1622
  • Ann Rice, aged 23, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [1]
  • Edmund Rice (c.1594�), English Deacon in the Puritan Church, born in Stanstead, Suffolk, who immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1638
  • John Rice, who settled in Virginia in 1639
  • Richard Rice, who settled in Virginia in 1650
Rice Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Carleton Rice, who landed in Virginia in 1717 [1]
  • Daniel Rice, who landed in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania in 1764 [1]
Rice Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Ally Rice, who landed in New London, Connecticut in 1811 [1]
  • Biddy Rice, who arrived in New York, NY in 1812 [1]
  • Charles Rice, aged 36, who arrived in Maryland in 1812 [1]
  • Canlan Rice, who arrived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1816 [1]
  • Bridget Rice, aged 6, who landed in New York, NY in 1855 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Rice migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Rice Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • David Rice, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Benjamin Rice, who arrived in Anapolis (Annapolis), Nova Scotia in 1760
  • Beriah Rice, who landed in Anapolis (Annapolis), Nova Scotia in 1760
Rice Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • James Rice, aged 39, a servant, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig "Ugoni" from Belfast, Ireland
  • Catherine Rice, aged 23, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Ann & Mary" from Cork, Ireland
  • Ann Rice, aged 18, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Ann & Mary" from Cork, Ireland
  • John Rice, aged 20, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Betsy Heron" from Belfast, Ireland
  • Mary Rice, aged 24, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Dorcas Savage" from Belfast, Ireland
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Rice migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Rice Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Henry Rice, British convict who was convicted in Chester, Cheshire, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[2]
  • Mr. John Rice, Canadian covict who was convicted in Kingston, Ontario, Canada for 14 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 16th January 1816, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[3]
  • Thomas Rice, English convict from Somerset, who was transported aboard the "Argyle" on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[4]
  • Catherine Rice, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the "Amphitrite" on August 21, 1833, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mary Rice, English convict from York, who was transported aboard the "Arab" on December 14, 1835, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Rice migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Rice Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • William Rice, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Bombay" in 1842
  • Mr. Michael Rice, British settler, as the 2nd Detachment of New Zealand Corps of Royal New Zealand Fencibles travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Minerva" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 8th October 1847 [7]
  • Mr. Robert Rice, (b. 1836), aged 22, Irish labourer from County Down travelling from London aboard the ship "Strathallan" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 21st January 1859 [8]
  • Mr. Hans Rice, (b. 1841), aged 21, Irish farm labourer from County Down travelling from London aboard the ship "Zealandia" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 23rd May 1862 [8]
  • Mr. Edward Rice, (b. 1826), aged 36, British labourer travelling from London aboard the ship "Echunga" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th December 1862 [7]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Rice (post 1700) +

  • Condoleezza Rice (b. 1954), American professor, diplomat, author, and national security expert, 66th United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor from 2001 to 2005
  • Ms. Anneka Rice (b. 1958), born in Cowbridge, Glamorganshire, as Anne Lucinda Hartley Rice, Welsh Presenter and Broadcaster best known Treasure Hunt and Challenge Anneka [9]
  • Norman Blann Rice (b. 1943), American politician who served as the 49th mayor of Seattle, Washington
  • David Anthony "Tony" Rice (1951-2020), American guitarist and bluegrass musician, inducted into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame in 2013
  • Kenneth Earl "Ken" Rice (1939-2020), American professional AFL football offensive tackle for the Buffalo Bills, Oakland Raiders, and the Miami Dolphins (1961-1967)
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Rice B.E.M., British Piper for Moodiesburn and District Pipe Band was appointed the British Empire Medal on 8th June 2018, for services to Music Education
  • Mr. Timothy James Rice M.B.E., British Sergeant of the Parachute Regiment, recipient of Member of the Order of the British Empire on 8th June 2018 [10]
  • Edmund Ignatius Rice (1762-1844), Irish founder of the Roman Catholic institute known as the ‘Irish Christian Brothers,’ and the pioneer of primary education in Ireland, born at Westcourt, near the town of Callan, co. Kilkenny
  • Dorothy P. Rice (1922-2017), American health statistician, Director of the National Center for Health Statistics from 1976 to 1982
  • Bonny "Mack" Rice (1933-2016), also known as Sir Mack Rice, an American songwriter and singer
  • . (Another 264 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Rice family +

Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. Edward Rice, British Fireman from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [11]
Halifax Explosion
  • Mrs. Clara Evelyn  Rice, Canadian resident from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [12]
  • Mr. Frank D.  Rice, Canadian resident from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [12]
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. Desmond Maxwell Rice (1924-1941), Australian Stoker 3rd Class from Elwood, Victoria, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [13]
HMS Cornwall
  • Geoffrey Frederick Rice, British Chief Engineer Room Artificer aboard the HMS Cornwall when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he survived the sinking [14]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Herbert F Rice (b. 1917), English Stoker 2nd Class serving for the Royal Navy from Birmingham, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [15]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. John Henry Rice, British Marine, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [16]
  • Mr. Francis Rice, British Able Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [16]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. Michael Rice, Irish Fireman from Armagh, Ireland, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [17]
  • Mr. Stephen Rice, Irish Fireman from County Armagh, Ireland, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [17]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. John Reginald Rice (d. 1912), aged 25, English Clerk from Crosby, Lancashire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking and was recovered by CS Mackay-Bennett [18]
  • Mr. Charles Rice (d. 1912), aged 32, English Trimmer from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [18]
  • Mrs. Margaret Rice (d. 1912), (née Norton), aged 39, Irish Third Class passenger from Athlone, Westmeath who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking and was recovered by CS Mackay-Bennett [18]
  • Master Albert Rice (d. 1912), aged 10, Irish Third Class passenger from Athlone, Westmeath who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [18]
  • Master George Hugh Rice (d. 1912), aged 8, Irish Third Class passenger from Athlone, Westmeath who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [18]
  • . (Another 3 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
USS Arizona
  • Mr. William Albert Rice, American Seaman Second Class from Washington, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [19]

Related Stories +

The Rice Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Secret et hardi
Motto Translation: Secret and bold.


Sussex County, Delaware


1874 Sussex County Courthouse

County Information
Organized: 1683
Area: 1,196 Square Miles
2010 Census: 197,145
County Seat: Georgetown
Largest City: Seaford

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Pilot Town
Pilot Town is the section of the Hamlet of Concord where many free black families have lived in harmony with the white families since around 1765. It was so named for the many African-American pilots who lived in the area and piloted vessels down the Nanticoke River to Chesapeake Bay. Two of the best known were Cann Laws and George Laws.
LOCATION: Concord. At junction of Road 20 East and Road 20A.

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JUNE 2021
PEOPLE: Ella King, Timmons Brothers, Woodburn Martin, Joseph D. Truxton

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Rice History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The origin of the proud surname Rice can be traced to the historic kingdom of Bohemia, which is now part of the Czech Republic. In the Middle Ages, many of the Bohemians were a part of the Holy Roman Empire, which was characterized by the Feudal System. Before this era, people were known only by a single name. However, as the population increased and travel became more prevalent, it became necessary for people to adopt a second name to identify themselves. Many people, such as the Rice family, adopted the name of their feudal occupation as their surname. The name goes back to the mediaeval German "ris" or "risle," which meant literally "branch" or "twig,"and the surname was an occupational name for a wood carver.

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Early Origins of the Rice family

The surname Rice was first found in Bohemia, where the name came from humble beginnings but gained a significant reputation for its contribution to the emerging mediaeval society. They later became more prominent as many branches of the same house acquired distant estates and branches, some in foreign countries, always elevating their social status by their great contributions to society. Chronicles first mention Clesse Reysse of Mainz in 1444, and Leonhart Reiser of Nuremberg in 1443. The name goes back to the mediaeval German "ris" or "risle," which meant literally "branch" or "twig." Reisser could also refer to a wood carver.

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Early History of the Rice family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rice research. Another 140 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1505, 1606, 1645, 1870, and 1897 are included under the topic Early Rice History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Rice Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Reis, Reisle ( Bavaria, Swabia), Reiss, Reisse, Riess, Ries, Reise, Reisz, Reiser, Reisser, Riser, Reysse, Reys, Reyss, Rice, Ris, Risse, Rise, Risle and many more.

Early Notables of the Rice family (pre 1700)

Another 44 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Rice Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Rice migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Rice Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Henry Rice who settled in Virginia in 1622
  • Ann Rice, aged 23, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [1]
  • Edmund Rice (c.1594�), English Deacon in the Puritan Church, born in Stanstead, Suffolk, who immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1638
  • John Rice, who settled in Virginia in 1639
  • Richard Rice, who settled in Virginia in 1650
Rice Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Carleton Rice, who landed in Virginia in 1717 [1]
  • Daniel Rice, who landed in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania in 1764 [1]
Rice Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Ally Rice, who landed in New London, Connecticut in 1811 [1]
  • Biddy Rice, who arrived in New York, NY in 1812 [1]
  • Charles Rice, aged 36, who arrived in Maryland in 1812 [1]
  • Canlan Rice, who arrived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1816 [1]
  • Bridget Rice, aged 6, who landed in New York, NY in 1855 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Rice migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Rice Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • David Rice, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Benjamin Rice, who arrived in Anapolis (Annapolis), Nova Scotia in 1760
  • Beriah Rice, who landed in Anapolis (Annapolis), Nova Scotia in 1760
Rice Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • James Rice, aged 39, a servant, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig "Ugoni" from Belfast, Ireland
  • Catherine Rice, aged 23, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Ann & Mary" from Cork, Ireland
  • Ann Rice, aged 18, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Ann & Mary" from Cork, Ireland
  • John Rice, aged 20, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Betsy Heron" from Belfast, Ireland
  • Mary Rice, aged 24, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Dorcas Savage" from Belfast, Ireland
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Rice migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Rice Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Henry Rice, British convict who was convicted in Chester, Cheshire, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[2]
  • Mr. John Rice, Canadian covict who was convicted in Kingston, Ontario, Canada for 14 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 16th January 1816, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[3]
  • Thomas Rice, English convict from Somerset, who was transported aboard the "Argyle" on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[4]
  • Catherine Rice, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the "Amphitrite" on August 21, 1833, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mary Rice, English convict from York, who was transported aboard the "Arab" on December 14, 1835, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Rice migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:


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