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USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942

USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942


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USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942

Here we see the New Orleans class heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York on 29 May 1942. Even this early in the American involvement in the war, the main changes involve the anti-aircraft guns.


Wreck of USS Quincy (CA-39)

Laid down at the Fore River Shipyard in her namesake city of Quincy, Massachusetts, USS Quincy was the second New Orleans Class Heavy Cruiser and commissioned into US Navy service in June 1936 as a member of the US Atlantic Fleet. Immediately dispatched to the Mediterranean Sea after her shakedown cruise, Quincy and her crew spent two months working with ships of the German Kriegsmarine in a humanitarian evacuation of refugees fleeing the Spanish Civil War before returning stateside and beginning a more routine schedule of cruises and exercises with both the US Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. After the outbreak of war in Europe in September 1939, Quincy joined her Atlantic Fleetmates in regular Neutrality Patrols in the North Atlantic and Caribbean, often serving as escort to US Carriers as they conducted operations off the Eastern seaboard.

By early 1941 Quincy was heavily involved with convoy escort duty between the US and Iceland in order to protect American and British shipping from the threat of U-Boat attack, a highly dangerous task often made worse by heavy seas and foul weather. Continuing this duty through October 1941, Quincy joined her sistership USS Vincennes (CA-44) as an escort for a British troopship convoy heading from Canada to South Africa and back, during which both ships received notice that the Empire of Japan had attacked Pearl Harbor, starting American involvement with the Second World War. Returning to her North Atlantic convoy duty through the first half of 1942, Quincy was ordered to New York Navy Yard where she spent three months receiving upgrades and repairs in preparation for her deployment to the Pacific Theatre.

Departing New York in May 1942, Quincy transited the Panama Canal and arrived at San Diego where she joined Task Force 18 as the Flagship for Admiral Norman Scott in mid-June. Spending the next month involved with intensive training as American forces massed for the planned Invasion of Guadalcanal Island in the Solomons, Quincy steamed in convoy to Noumea, New Caledonia where the remainder of the Allied invasion force was mustering. After provisioning for the upcoming battle Quincy was reassigned to Task Group 62.3, Fire Support Group L along with her sisterships USS Vincennes (CA-44) and USS Astoria (CA-34) and departed in advance of the Allied Invasion Force, arriving off the landing beaches at Lunga Point under the cover of darkness in the early morning hours of August 7th, 1942. Conducting shore bombardment of Japanese installations as US Marines began to move ashore, Quincy’s gunners destroyed several buildings, gun emplacements and a fuel dump before the rapid advance of ground forces brought a cease fire across the fleet. Moving out to screen the landing area and the vulnerable transports, Quincy and her sisterships drove off two separate Japanese air attacks over the next two days and as night fell on the 8th Quincy withdrew to the Northern entrance to Ironbottom Sound with Vincennes and Astoria and began their portion of the Allied defensive patrol guarding the landing area.

Aboard Quincy Capt. Samuel Moore, Quincy's Commanding Officer, had received word along with the rest of the formation that Japanese warships had been spotted enroute to Guadalcanal from Rabaul by coastwatchers, and like his counterparts aboard Vincennes and Astoria Capt. Moore surmised that the Japanese ships would likely stage an attack at or shortly before first light. Posting extra lookouts before retiring to his sea cabin, Capt. Moore left instructions to be awoken if anything seemed amiss during the coming night, but was not disturbed when lookouts sighted numerous flares and flashes to the South shortly after 0100hrs on August 9th. Incorrectly assumed to be related to fighting on Guadalcanal and not the utter decimation of fellow Allied Cruisers HMAS Canberra and USS Chicago (CA-29) by the same Japanese Surface Force her crew expected to arrive the following morning, no actions were taken aboard Quincy and her crew remained largely unaware that the same group of Japanese ships had split formation and were now bearing down on her and her sisterships from both sides.

All remained quiet onboard until 0150hrs when Quincy, Vincennes and Astoria were suddenly lit up by Japanese searchlights to both Port and Starboard, followed shortly thereafter by the rumble of naval artillery. Steaming in the center position of the three Cruisers, Quincy was easily ranged by the seasoned Japanese gunners who were highly proficient in night fighting, and within minutes shells were slamming into her midship hangar area where her scout planes and ready aviation fuel stores provided more than enough fuel for a large fire which made her a brightly lit target. Racing to the bridge, Captain Moore ordered his ship to flank speed and brought Quincy out of formation to Starboard, with all nine guns of her 8-inch main battery barking fire on whichever target her gun directors could find. Sighting the Japanese Cruiser and Flagship HIJMS Chokai, Quincy’s gunners fired several salvoes at the ship, at least one of which caused moderate damage and killed 34 crew when it destroyed her #1 gun turret. Quincy’s offensive stand was short-lived however, as she continued to absorb dozens of hits of Cruiser and Destroyer caliber shells across her length while she inadvertently turned directly towards one of the Japanese formations.

As Quincy completed the Easterly turn Capt. Moore had hoped would reduce his ships’ broadside to its attackers, two “Long Lance” torpedoes slammed into her Stern, followed by a direct hit on her bridge by an 8-inch shell which killed or severely wounded every man present, including the majority of Quincy’s Commanding Officers. Steaming Northeast with nobody at the helm, Quincy’s gunners continued to fire at their assailants until a third torpedo struck the ship ahead of her boiler rooms, which when combined with the dozens of shell holes already flooding the ship began to douse the Cruiser’s boiler fires and rob her of power. Damage control parties arriving at the bridge found the mortally wounded Captain Moore barely alive, but still able to instruct the crewman who had manned the helm to “Beach the Ship” before losing consciousness. Steadily losing forward speed and with her gun mounts all but knocked out by shellfire, Quincy continued to be shelled by Japanese Cruisers from almost point-blank range until they shifted their fire to her sisterships, leaving Quincy a derelict wreck down heavily by the bow, listing to Port and heavily aflame in multiple areas.

Quincy's surviving crew needed little instruction to abandon ship as those who could made their way topside to find the deck a mass of fire, shell holes and rapidly advancing seas. Shortly after the Japanese force had checked their fire and began their withdrawal, USS Quincy sank bow-first at this location at 0238hrs on August 9th, 1942, taking 370 of her crew with her to the bottom.

For her actions on the date of her loss, USS Quincy received her first and final Battle Star for World War Two service.


USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942 - History

TQUINCY CA-39 Displacement: 9,375 t. Length: 5882 Beam: 6110 Draft: 195 Speed: 32 k. Complement: 807 Armament: 9 8 8 5 8 . 50 cal. MG Class: NEW ORLEANS

QUINCY (CA-39) was laid down by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Quincy, Mass., 15 November 1933 launched 19 June 1935 sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Morgan and commissioned at Boston 9 June 1936, Capt. William Faulkner Amsden in command.

Soon after being assigned to Cruiser Division 8 Atlantic Fleet, QUINCY was ordered to Mediterranean waters 20 July 1936, to protect American interests in Spain during the height of the Spanish Civil War. QUINCY passed through the Straits of Gibraltar 26 July and arrived at Malaga, Spain, 27 July to assume her duties. While in Spanish waters, she operated with an international rescue fleet that included the German pocket battleships DEUTSCHLAND, ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE and ADMIRAL SCHEER. QUINCY evacuated 490 refugees to Marseilles and Villefranche, France, before being relieved by RALEIGH (CL-7) 27 September.

QUINCY returned to the Boston Navy Yard 5 October for refit preparatory to final acceptance trials which were held 15-18 March 1937. She got underway for the Pacific 12 April to join Cruiser Division 7, transited the Panama Canal 23-27 April and arrived at Pearl Harbor 10 May.

QUINCY sortied with Cruiser Divisions, Pacific Fleet, 20 May on a tactical exercise which was the first of many such maneuvers that she participated in during 1937 and 1938. From 15 March-28 April, she engaged in important battle practice off Hawaii with the Pacific Fleet in Fleet Problem XIX. After an overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard, QUINCY resumed tactical operations with her division off San Clemente, Calif., until her redeployment to the Atlantic 4 January 1939.

QUINCY transited the Panama Canal 13 January bound for Guantanamo Bay where she engaged in gunnery practice and amphibious exercises. She also took part in Fleet Problem XX with the Atlantic Fleet 13-26 February. QUINCY later made a South American good will tour 10 April-12 June, and upon returning to Norfolk, embarked reservists for three training cruises 9 July-24 August. She spent the remainder of 1939 on patrol in the North Atlantic due to the outbreak of World War II.

After overhaul at Norfolk until 4 May 1940, QUINCY again visited Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina, returning to Norfolk 22 September. She completed three more reserve training cruises 1 October-20 December.

QUINCY was occupied in Atlantic Fleet maneuvers and landing force exercises off Culebra Island, P.R. 3 February-1 April 1941. With the growth of hostilities in Europe, she was ordered to Task Group 2 and operated with WASP (CV-7) in the mid-Atlantic, preserving U. S. neutrality 26 April-6 June. Later, she operated with YORKTOWN (CV-5) and Task Group 28 until sailing for home 14 July.

On 28 July 1941, QUINCY sailed with Task Group 16 for Iceland on neutrality duty which included a patrol in the Denmark Straits 21-24 September. She returned to Newfoundland with a convoy 31 October. QUINCY then proceeded to Capetown, South Africa, via Trinidad, where she met a convoy which she escorted back to Trinidad 29 December 1941.

QUINCY returned 25 January 1942 to Icelandic waters on convoy duty with Task Force 15 and made a patrol in the Denmark Straits 8-11 March. She departed 14 March for the U. S. and an overhaul at the New York Navy Yard that lasted until the end of May.

QUINCY sailed for San Diego 5 June via the Panama Canal and arrived 19 June. She was then assigned to Task Force 18 as the flagship of Rear Admiral Norman R. Scott, Commander, Cruisers.

QUINCY got underway for the South Pacific in July with other vessels assembling for the invasion of Guadalcanal. Prior to the Marine assault on Guadalcanal 7 August, QUINCY destroyed several Japanese installations and an oil depot during her bombardment of Lunga Point. She later provided close fire support for the Marines during the landing. While on patrol in the channel between Florida Island and Savo Island, in the early hours of 9 August 1942, QUINCY was attacked by a large Japanese naval force and sank after sustaining many direct hits with all guns out of action. QUINCY earned one battle star during World War II.


USS Quincy (CA-39)


Figure 1: USS Quincy (CA-39) photographed during the late 1930s. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Quincy (CA-39) underway at sea, circa 1937. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: Cruiser Division Seven's South American Cruise, 1939. View of USS Quincy (CA-39) at left and USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) steaming in rough seas near the Strait of Magellan, 14 May 1939. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Rear Admiral Paul H. Bastedo. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: View looking forward from the bridge of USS Quincy (CA-39) while she was steaming through rough seas in the Strait of Magellan during Cruiser Division Seven's South American cruise, 14 May 1939. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Rear Admiral Paul H. Bastedo. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: USS Quincy (CA-39) underway on 1 May 1940, as seen from a Utility Squadron One aircraft. Note identification markings on her turret tops: longitudinal stripes on the forward turrets and a circle on the after one. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: USS Quincy (CA-39) in New York Harbor, 23 May 1942, after her last overhaul. HMS Biter (British Escort Aircraft Carrier, 1942) is in the left background, partially hidden by Quincy's bow. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 7: View on board USS Quincy (CA-39) looking aft on the port side from alongside 8-inch gun turret No. 1 while the ship was at the New York Navy Yard on 29 May 1942. Numbers in white circles mark recently installed items, including (# 1) splinter protection on the pilothouse (# 2) 20-mm guns just forward of the pilothouse (largely hidden behind the second 8-inch gun turret) and (# 3) 1.1-inch gun mountings on the upper bridge wings. Other notable items include paravanes on the superstructure side just forward of the second 8-inch gun turret and the rangefinder "tub" atop the pilothouse. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 8: View on board USS Quincy (CA-39) looking forward over the boat deck from the secondary conn while the ship was at the New York Navy Yard for her last overhaul, 29 May 1942. Crude # "1" in white circle (center) marks the location of the 5-inch loading practice machine. Other notable items include: boats and boat cradle in foreground four Curtiss SOC "Seagull" floatplanes atop the catapults crated food piled by the after smokestack and USS Marblehead (CL-12) at left. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 9: USS Quincy (CA-39) photographed from USS Wasp (CV-7) at Noumea, New Caledonia, on the eve of the invasion of Guadalcanal, 3 August 1942. She was sunk six days later during the Battle of Savo Island. Note Quincy's signal flags and Measure 12, Modified, camouflage scheme. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 10: USS President Adams (AP-38) photographed from USS Wasp (CV-7), at Noumea, New Caledonia, 4 August 1942. She is crowded with U.S. Marines bound for the invasion of Guadalcanal. USS Quincy (CA-39) is in the background. Note President Adams' life rafts, landing craft, and climbing netting. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 11: USS Quincy (CA-39) photographed from a Japanese cruiser during the Battle of Savo Island off Guadalcanal, 9 August 1942. Quincy, seen here burning and illuminated by Japanese searchlights, was sunk in this action. Copied from the Rear Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison World War II history illustrations file. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 12: Captain Samuel N. Moore (1891-1942), USN, photographed circa 1941, while he was assigned to the Navy Department in Washington, D.C. In May 1942, he took command of the heavy cruiser USS Quincy. On 9 August 1942, during the night Battle of Savo Island, Captain Samuel N. Moore was killed in action on the bridge of his ship. The destroyer USS Samuel N. Moore (DD-747), which served from 1944 until 1969, was named in his honor. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.

Named after a city in Massachusetts, USS Quincy (CA-39) was a 9,375-ton New Orleans class heavy cruiser that was built by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, and was commissioned on 9 June 1936. The ship was approximately 588 feet long and 61 feet wide, had a top speed of 32 knots, and had a crew of 807 officers and men. Quincy initially was armed with nine 8-inch guns, eight 5-inch guns, and eight .50-caliber machine guns, although this armament was modified a bit after the start of World War II. Quincy also was equipped with four lightly armed floatplanes that were used for reconnaissance.

Quincy first was assigned to Cruiser Division 8 of the Atlantic Fleet and was ordered to the Mediterranean on 20 July 1936 to protect American citizens during the Spanish Civil War. The heavy cruiser arrived off Malaga, Spain, on 27 July and while in Spanish waters worked with an international rescue fleet that included the German pocket battleships Deutschland, Admiral Graf Spee, and Admiral Scheer. During the Spanish Civil War, Quincy evacuated 490 refugees to France before being relieved by USS Raleigh on 27 September 1936.

In April 1937, Quincy transited the Panama Canal to begin operations in the Pacific. She returned to the Atlantic in January 1939 and in February took part in US naval exercises in the Caribbean. Quincy also spent some time in South American waters from April to June 1939 on a good will cruise.

Following the outbreak of World War II in Europe in September 1939, Quincy was assigned to the Neutrality Patrol in the western Atlantic. She returned to South America in mid-1940 and for several months acted as a training ship for Naval Reservists. Quincy also was attached to more Neutrality Patrols and participated in various amphibious warfare exercises in the Caribbean. In July 1941, Quincy steamed between America’s Atlantic coast and Iceland, assisting in the protection of unarmed American merchant ships in the area. Towards the end of 1941, Quincy escorted a convoy from South Africa to Trinidad. Her escort and patrol duties continued until shortly after the United States entered the war on 7 December 1941.

On 25 January 1942, Quincy was assigned to convoy escort duty and steamed off the coast of Iceland as part of Task Force 15. Quincy patrolled the Denmark Straits from 8 to 11 March and then left the area on 14 March for the New York Navy Yard. Once there, the heavy cruiser underwent a major overhaul that was to last until the end of May.

After the overhaul was completed, Quincy was transferred to the Pacific Fleet by way of the Panama Canal in June 1942. The following month, Quincy was sent to New Zealand in preparation for the invasion of the southern Solomon Islands. On 7 August 1942, the heavy cruiser bombarded Japanese targets on Guadalcanal and provided close fire support for the US Marines who were landing on the island.

During the evening of 8𔃇 August 1942, Quincy was one of five heavy cruisers (four American and one Australian) on patrol in the approaches to the landing beaches of Guadalcanal. While steaming in the channel between Florida Island and Savo Island in the early hours of 9 August, Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa’s Japanese task force of seven cruisers and one destroyer ran straight into five Allied cruisers and seven destroyers. What took place became known as the disastrous Battle of Savo Island, where the Japanese, who were experts in night gunfire and torpedo warfare, slaughtered the inexperienced Allied warships. USS Quincy, along with two other American and one Australian cruiser, were sunk and the remaining American cruiser was damaged. Approximately 1,002 Allied officers and men were killed and 666 were wounded. Quincy alone lost 370 killed and 167 wounded. The Japanese sustained only a few casualties and moderate damage to three cruisers, but lost no ships. It was one of the worst disasters in American naval history and tragically demonstrated the US Navy’s inability to fight a major naval battle at night. It also was a sad end to the relatively brief career of a fine ship, but the loss of USS Quincy (as well as the other Allied cruisers that night off Savo Island) showed that the US Navy had a lot to learn if it was going to prevail over the Japanese Navy at Guadalcanal.


World War II Database


ww2dbase Assigned to Cruiser Division 8 of the United States Navy Atlantic Fleet, Quincy's first mission was to sail for the Mediterranean area in Jul 1936 to protect American interests in Spain during the height of its civil war. She served alongside German heavy cruisers at Málaga to evacuate their respective nationals out of Spain. She returned to Boston Navy Yard on 5 Oct 1936, and in the following spring she completed her final trials. She was re-assigned to the Pacific Fleet's Cruiser Division 7 she left Boston on 12 Apr and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 10 May. After engaging in several exercises, she spent some time at Mare Island Navy Yard for an overhaul, then headed back for the Atlantic. She participated in the Good Will Tour to South American 10 Apr-12 Jun 1939.

ww2dbase After Germany launched its invasion of Poland, USS Quincy was sent to North Atlantic for Neutrality Patrols. Early 1941 saw her in the Caribbean, then mid-Atlantic until Jun 1941. She served in the Atlantic with carriers Wasp and Yorktown. On 28 Jul 1941, she sailed with Task Force 16 to Iceland, then headed for patrols in the Denmark Straits during the end of Sep. Later in 1941, she escorted a convoy from Capetown back to Trinidad in the Caribbean Islands. She spent the first half of 1942 back in the North Atlantic, then returned to the United States for an overhaul at New York Navy Yard in May 1942.

ww2dbase On 19 Jun 1942, USS Quincy arrived at San Diego and became the flagship of Rear Admiral Norman Scott of Task Force 18. From there she departed for the South Pacific in Jul to support the invasion of Guadalcanal. She arrived in the area in the first week of Aug, and participated in preliminary shelling of the Japanese-held island on 7 Aug in the shelling she destroyed several Japanese installations and an oil depot at Lunga Point. When the American Marines made the landing, she also provided gun support. During the early hours of 9 Aug 1942, while on patrol off Savo Island north of Guadalcanal, her force was surprise attacked by Admiral Gunichi Mikawa's force. When the attacking Japanese cruisers trained their searchlights on Quincy, Quincy's guns were still trained. She was caught between two columns of Japanese cruisers and received a pounding. "We're going down between them - give them hell!" said Captain Moore of Quincy. She fought valiantly, but was not able to overcome the heavy firing from the Japanese cruisers. She capsized and sank at about 0235 that day, becoming one of the first ships that eventually nicknamed that area of the water "Ironbottom Sound". 370 lives were lost aboard Quincy during the Battle of Savo Island, and 167 were wounded.

ww2dbase Sources:
Samuel Eliot Morison, The Struggle for Guadalcanal
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Mar 2006

Heavy Cruiser Quincy (New Orleans-class) (CA-39) Interactive Map

Quincy (New Orleans-class) Operational Timeline

24 Dec 1932 The keel of battleship Dunkerque was laid down at Brest Navy Yard, France.
2 Oct 1935 The French Battleship Dunkerque was launched at Brest shipyard in France.
9 Jun 1936 Quincy was commissioned into service.
31 May 1940 US Ambassador to Argentina Norman Armour and US Minister in Uruguay Edwin C. Wilson met in Montevideo, Uruguay regarding the deteriorating political situation in Uruguay. They jointly requested Secretary of State Cordell Hull to ask President Roosevelt to sent 40 to 50 warships to the eastern coast of South America as a show of force to prevent Uruguay from partnering with Germany. Later in the day, Hull would inform them that heavy cruiser USS Quincy was dispatched for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil per their suggestion, and she would visit Montevideo on the journey. State Department official Laurence Duggan would suggest Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles to publicize USS Quincy's South American tour.
12 Jun 1940 USS Quincy arrived at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
17 Jun 1940 Heavy cruiser USS Quincy departed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for Montevideo, Uruguay.
20 Jun 1940 USS Quincy reached Montevideo, Uruguay, as part of the American effort to counteract German propaganda in Latin America.
3 Jul 1940 USS Wichita and USS Quincy departed Montevideo, Uruguay for Brazilian waters.
5 Jul 1940 USS Wichita and USS Quincy arrived in Rio Grande du Sol, Brazil.
8 Jul 1940 USS Wichita and USS Quincy departed Santos, Brazil for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
11 Jul 1940 USS Wichita and USS Quincy departed Rio Grande du Sol, Brazil for Santos, Brazil.
13 Jul 1940 USS Wichita and USS Quincy (CA-39) arrived at Santos, Brazil.
19 Jul 1940 Cruisers USS Wichita and USS Quincy arrived at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil destroyers USS Walke and USS Wainwright arrived later on the same day with Marines for Wichita and Quincy, respectively.
25 Jul 1940 USS Wichita and USS Quincy departed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for Bahia, Brazil.
31 Jul 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita and USS Quincy arrived at Bahia, Brazil.
5 Aug 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita and USS Quincy departed Bahia, Brazil for Pernambuco, Brazil.
9 Aug 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita and USS Quincy arrived at Pernambuco, Brazil.
13 Aug 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita and USS Quincy departed Pernambuco, Brazil for Montevideo, Uruguay.
23 Aug 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita (with chief of Cruiser Division 7 Rear Admiral Andrew C. Pickens on board) and USS Quincy arrived at Montevideo, Uruguay.
28 Aug 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita (with Rear Admiral Andrew C. Pickens on board) and USS Quincy departed Montevideo, Uruguay for Buenos Aires, Argentina.
29 Aug 1940 Heavy cruisers USS Wichita (with Rear Admiral Andrew C. Pickens on board) and USS Quincy arrived at Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Kathy Perry says:
8 Sep 2009 09:43:27 AM

I am looking for more information on my uncle Samuel Laughon that was an officer on the Quincy.

2. Dorothy Dillinger says:
26 Jul 2010 08:40:12 AM

I am looking for information on my father, Noah "Bud" Dillinger, who served on the Quincy.

3. RLB says:
19 Jul 2011 06:16:41 PM

Looking for any info on Bernard M. Wolfe, USS Quincy 1939

4. Linda Kiddier says:
23 Aug 2011 09:06:35 AM

I am looking for info on my grandfather Luther Joseph Turton who was on the Quincy

5. Polly Dotson says:
3 Oct 2011 02:20:30 AM

I am looking for information on my uncle, Ancie Runyon EM3 on board during first fight at Savo Island when it sunk August 9,1942. He did not survive.

6. Steve Alberti says:
29 Apr 2012 07:16:49 AM

I'm trying to find some information on my uncle, Logan Kidwell, Water Tender on the USS Quincy. He died on the Quincy during the battle of Savo Island. Gratefull for any information!

7. Dennis painter says:
10 Apr 2013 04:13:59 PM

I am looking for information on the Marines aboard the USS Quincy(CA 39) that survived or were killed or listed as MIA on the Guadacanal Landings of 08/09/42 and, specifically, 2nd. Lt. Arthur Gutman and Private John Commers. They may have been in the same unit as both were assigned to Anti-Aircfraft duties. I know that Lt. Gutman was killed prior to the ship sinking, as per a Captain that was a witness, but am not sure about Private Commers. I know that their parents had one Hell of a time getting their benefits out of the Marine Corps. based upon copies of their service records and that is one sad fact that I wished I had not known about. It was over a year before their parents were told about their deaths. I can only imagine the agony they went through as I have seen copies of the letters that went back and forth from the War Department to them. Not only were they kept in the dark about the deaths, the War Department did not inform the parents about what benefits were due them and what $$ they had in their savings accounts, etc. and had to get their U.S. Reps. involved to get the information for them. I know that in 1942 we were getting our butts kicked by the superior firepower and technology of the Japanese and the government did not want the public to know that but there is no excuse for this type of treatment to the survivors. The parents are long deceased now but i would like to get as much information about this event for their families to make sure they know these brave men did not die in vain. I assume they are resting on the bottom of " Iron Bottom Sound " and I plan on going there to drop some flowers over the wreck site before I die. I was born almost 6 years after their deaths and Private Commers' family were neighbors for several years and they never talked about it and the first time I saw his photo in an old WWII newspaper marked
" lost at sea ", his face has haunted me ever since and I was probably only age 6 at the time.
This event should be made into a movie as all three heavy cruisers went down.
SEMPER FI and MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU forever and May GOD bless you.
Thank you very very much for your service to our country and the payment of the ultimate sacrifice.

8. Janet Peterson says:
11 Nov 2013 02:21:46 PM

My dad Howard Phifer was a survivor of the 1942 sinking of the Quincy. I was born in 1961 and my father never talked about the war but it affected him for the rest of his life. He died in 1987 when he was 70. I would like to find someone who my have been told about him or maybe even knew him at that time, although I know that's unlikely. I believe he was chief bosents mate and would have been 25 at the time. Also his last name may be mispelled as "Pieffer". I'm having a hard time finding crew information. I do know that he was in the third division,they were known as "the fighting third".

9. Adrian Ringus says:
21 Apr 2014 07:21:14 PM

RINGUS, JULIAN G 2125289 USN BM2 08/09/1942

Julian Gustan Ringus, Boatswain's Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Joseph Ringus, 56 Sanders St., Athol.

Julian was a boxer in the Navy. He won the "Light -JR" boxing gold 26th Division championship in 1938.
He Died on the USS Quincy at the Battle of Savo Island 9 August 1942
My family never got Julian's Purple Heart.

10. Barry Robertson says:
18 Jun 2014 10:04:25 PM

My father,Robert Edward Robertson,was the Quincy when she was sunk.He was a gunners mate on a 5in gun topside.He survived but would rarely talk about it.He once said that there were mistakes made.He mentioned sharks and alot of time before they were picked up.Any info would be greatly appreciated.There's a great book on the fiasico called Neptune's Inferno that I recommend,audio also.It goes into detail about the failures of leadership.

11. Karen E. Jenkins says:
26 Mar 2015 05:00:01 AM

My uncle, James William Hunt was on the Quincy and was a survivor. Need to find a survivor list to prove he was there. He passed away in Sept. 2014 and his naval records are not complete. He was a loader in the number one gun turret. Any information would be appreciated. Thanks

12. Jane L. Ries says:
26 Mar 2015 08:10:34 PM

I do the military pictures for the Effingham County Courthouse Museum in Effingham, Illinois. This veteran, DeWitt Talmadge Van Dyke died aboard the USS Quincy on August 1942. People who are looking for info should check the microfilm of old local newspapers if at all possible. This was one of the articles I found on DeWitt T. Van Dyke. D.T. VAN DYKE, JR., MISSING IN ACTION, NAVY REPORTS

A message was received over the week-end by Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Van Dyke, Sr., of Effingham, from Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, stating that their son, DeWitt Van Dyke Jr., boilermaker first-class in the U.S. Navy, who was reported missing in action August 9, 1943, was killed in action during a major sea battle of Guadalcanal. Van Dyke was aboard the cruiser U.S.S. Quincy at the time of his death. Van Dyke, who was 23 years of age, was a graduate of Effingham high school and had enlisted in the Navy in the fall of 1938. Besides his parents, he leaves one brother, Logan Van Dyke of Effingham, and one sister, Odessa at home.

13. Kim Hoyo Strike says:
26 Apr 2015 07:15:48 AM

I'm looking for infomration about my uncle, Karl T. Hoyo. He was a fireman first class on the Quincy. His nickname was Swede. Two of his best friends on the ship were "Hop" and "Del." Any infomration will be appreciated.

14. Paula Booth says:
24 May 2015 03:51:46 PM

My father Clifton Booth and his brother Charlie Quinton Booth both served on the U.S.S.Quincy when she was sunk. My father survived the ordeal but Charlie Quinton did not. My father was well along in years before he told the story of that terrible attack. This is what he related to me- everyone knew the attack was coming and that last night he and his brother and some shipmates sat on the fantail and talked about their families and what they felt about the possibility of dying--they had been taking men into battle (the marines they had transported) and they knew death was all around. There was lots of conversation about their orders- they were floating around the islands "making lazy eights" waiting for the Japanese Navy to show up but the commanders were certain they wouldn't be in til at least dawn-so they had plenty of time- the men he was with weren't so optimistic. When the shooting started, they weren't prepared. Everyone ran to his station but most of the guns didn't even get off a round. My Dad's gun station did manage to fire several rounds- he said they were pulling up the shells looking down at fires below them- he thought he saw the explosion that wiped out Charlie Quinton's turret but he kept working. When the abandon ship call was made, he walked to the bin where the life jackets were kept (apparently then you didn't wear it til you needed it ?)he said the ship was listing badly by that time and the dead and injured were everywhere but mostly everyone he saw was dead. He said he walked to the rail and because the ship was sinking so rapidly, just walked off into the water. He said the fighting was still going on all around them and the men in the water tried to get away from the ship which was burning and going down fast. What seemed like forever was over in a moment and then the waiting began. The men knew they had lost this battle and lost it bad so they didn't know what would happen. They tried to stay together and not drift off. Before long the shelling was over and they began to hope for rescue. Suddenly they heard gunfire and their first thought was the Japanese sailors were shooting the American survivors in the water. They tried to swim away but the boats kept coming. Finally they heard American voices telling them to swim to them, there are sharks in the water and they can't hold them off. My Dad was picked up and taken aboard another ship. It was there the deaths of his bother,captain and may shipmates were confirmed.

15. Ann Lightbody says:
16 Apr 2016 05:35:47 PM

I'm looking for information on my Great Uncle Joseph Dietz who was on board the USS Quincy went it went down on August 9, 1942. I'm not sure what his rank was. Thank you for any and all information.

16. David Stubblebine says:
16 Apr 2016 08:13:50 PM

The Muster Rolls for the USS Quincy list a Fireman 3rd class Joseph Francis Dietz from at least 16 Nov 1940 through to the sinking. [It is important to remember what the rating of “Fireman” means in the Navy. These were not firefighters but rather they kept the fires burning in the engine room – commonly called “the black gang.”]

17. Anonymous says:
29 May 2016 07:24:13 PM

Looking for information on Robert McCoy, my uncle. I thought he served on the Quincy. He servived the sinking off salvo island. Would like proof he was part of Quincy's crew.
Much appreciated.

18. Carl Justice says:
7 May 2017 07:36:45 AM

I am a Navy vet. I lost an uncle who was on the USS Quincy in WW11. The ship was sunk before I was born - 1945
Can you confirm Ned Hornick rate/rank?

19. David Stubblebine says:
7 May 2017 04:38:50 PM

Carl Justice (above):
Edward Henry Hornick, Seaman 1st class, service number 258 21 24, who enlisted 12 Sep 1938 at Baltimore MD, was received aboard Quincy on 8 Apr 1942 from the Receiving Station, Boston MA. He apparently was transferred off the muster rolls on 3 Sep 1942 after Quincy was sunk a month earlier on 9 Aug 1942.

20. David Stubblebine says:
7 May 2017 04:57:54 PM

Anonymous #17 (above):
Robert John McCoy, Fireman 3rd class, service number 342 08 52, who enlisted 6 Sep 1938 at Kansas City MO, was received aboard Quincy on 5 Jul 1939 at Norfolk VA. He is last mentioned in the Quincy muster rolls on 30 Jun 1942. He is listed in the USS Argonne Dec 1942 muster rolls as a Machinists Mate 1st class and that he was received aboard on 21 Aug 1942.

21. Jack Baker says:
1 Jun 2017 11:02:09 AM

My father-in-law, Harvey E Walker, now 94 was a machinist mate 1st class on the Quincy when it was sunk in August of 1945. His health is failing and I am wondering how many remaining survivors are still alive. And information is greatly appreciated.

22. Anonymous says:
28 Jun 2017 08:43:24 AM

My grandfather, Frederick Milton Higgison was on the Quincy. He survived and was sunk again on the ship that picked him up. I'm trying to find out anything I can as I am now the family historian. Thank you.

23. Carl Justice says:
9 Jul 2017 09:32:45 AM

Edward Henry Hornick, 258-21-24 was KIA when the Quincy went down. He is/was an uncle I never met. I was born in 1945. Are there any photos available through Navy archives? I don't even know what he looked like.

24. Frank Robertson says:
9 Aug 2017 01:25:53 PM

A salute To All Quincy veterans ,You are remembered on this day August 9th 2017

25. Karen Harter says:
15 Aug 2017 11:05:00 AM

Wondering if you can confirm if Joseph Corliss of New York was on the Quincy. He rarely spoke about the war but once told us an emotional story of how they were sunk and just now as I am cleaning out some files, I found a bunch of papers with the history of the USS Quincy and at the end, in his writing, he notes all who died, got injured and the total casualties. Makes me think that was the ship. Thanks. -K

26. David Stubblebine says:
15 Aug 2017 09:52:05 PM

Karen Harter (above):
The Quincy Muster Rolls list a Joseph Walter Corliss, service number 223 41 12, who enlisted 6 Oct 1937 in Brooklyn NY and was received aboard Quincy 9 Mar 1938 as a Seaman 2nd-class. He left the ship as a Fire Controlman 2nd-class 13 Oct 1941 due to being Honorably Discharged at the end of his enlistment. His discharge was almost 2 months before Pearl Harbor and 10 months before Quincy was sunk. You can learn a lot more about his time in the Navy by requesting a copy of his service record. See http://ww2db.com/faq/#3

27. Anonymous says:
16 Aug 2017 10:08:41 AM

Thank you David. I must get his records as there is more to the story me thinks. I also have typed up history from him of the USS South Dakota (BB 57) and USS Shangri-La (CV 38). Like I said, he never spoke about it so it's all a puzzle for us. Thanks again! -K

28. Anne Gabor says:
21 Oct 2017 07:01:52 AM

My grandfather served on the quincy as a radioman and just happened to be called on shore the night it was sunk. He passed away earlier this year at 94. I'm looking for a crew roster, list of those who served as well as those who perished to help keep their memories alive. Any direction would be much appreciated

29. Mickie Boldt says:
4 Dec 2017 09:44:25 AM

My second cousin, whom we called "Uncle" as he was much older, Clyde Sell served on the Quincy during WWII. I am trying to find the official record of this, but am having no luck. As Anne asked in October - is there a crew roster available anywhere? I would love to find this information - thanks!

30. Margo Adams says:
12 Jan 2018 09:10:34 PM

My great uncle, my father's namesake died at the battle of Savo Island on the USS Quincy.

31. allucier says:
12 Apr 2018 10:20:10 AM

my Father was on the ship when it sunk

32. Sam Morrison says:
27 May 2018 11:22:12 AM

My father, C.F. Morrison,MD was aboard the night she sank.

33. Bri Hill says:
27 Aug 2018 12:02:37 PM

My grandfather's brother was aboard, and I was hoping to find more information

34. Anonymous says:
25 Dec 2018 04:46:00 PM

Harold junior west survived the sinking. Any info on him.

35. Mark Minges says:
31 Dec 2018 03:14:00 PM

My uncle "Hugh" Ferguson Minges was on the ship the night it sunk. Would appreciate any info on him.

36. Jodi Astley says:
25 Jul 2019 06:49:08 AM

My Father. Wallace (Wally) Rehbein served proudly aboard the USS Quincy, he survived the ship being sunk, he went on to live a wonderful life with the love of his life and brought me in to this world. I have heard stories from my Dad of how he cooked for the whole crew.. as well as the courage these men showed the night their ship was sunk, my Dad did not like to talk about that night, yet he did portray to me the fear those whom survived experienced that fateful night.
Sadly, my Dad passed away in 2016 but lived a wonderful life. and had a wonderful loving family.
I just wanted to give an update to anyone who served along side my Dad, as well as give my sincere thank you to all of you who served proudly on the USS Quincy.
Thank You For Your Service!!

37. Kelly says:
4 Aug 2019 05:59:37 PM

Warren Keyes was a survivor of this battle on the USS Quincy and I would love more information on him or this battle.

38. David Stubblebine says:
5 Aug 2019 09:26:30 PM

Kelly (above):
Navy Muster Rolls list Seaman 1st-class Warren Lee Keyes, service number 337 61 99, enlisted 5 Jun 1941 at St. Louis, Missouri and reported aboard USS Quincy 8 Apr 1942 at Boston, Massachusetts and was immediate transferred to Quincy’s aviation unit, Cruiser Scouting Squadron 7. The Rolls later list him being transferred to the troop ship USS Wharton 10 Aug 1942 as a survivor of the Quincy. Warren Keyes’ service record will have much more detail about his time in the Navy. For more on how to order a copy, see https://ww2db.com/faq/#3.

39. Linwood Smith says:
11 Aug 2019 08:30:07 PM

My uncle, Ensign Norman Keene
Smith, served on the USS Quincy and died during the Battle of Savo Island. He was MIA. Looking for information about him.

40. Garry Bryan says:
6 Mar 2020 04:39:01 PM

Was looking for a crew list listing my father Vernon Bryan Jr. as crew member. He survived Savo Island and had a book dedicated to him for keep pressure to re-open the investigation into the collapse of the chain of command.

41. Brian Curran says:
8 Jul 2020 12:28:43 PM

I have a bunch of photos from my grandfather from the Quincy in 1936-37. Linwood, would your uncle have gone by "Red" Keene by any chance? I have a photo of "Red" Keane (spelled this way but could be wrong).

42. Jennifer says:
19 Nov 2020 02:59:58 PM

I am looking for any Information about John Robert King, who served on the Quincy in 1939. Thanks

43. Mark Minges says:
30 Nov 2020 08:02:06 AM

My Uncle, Hugh F. Minges, served on the Quincy. He was an anti-aircraft gunner, I believe. He was aboard her when she was sunk. He would've been around 20 years of age then. He survived the war, lived to be 70.

44. Anonymous says:
31 May 2021 10:26:24 AM

Looking for any information on William Lee Jones, Age22 , EM at the time of the Quincy sinking. Born in Akron, Ohio. I am his daughter that he never got to meet and I would appreciate any and all information bout my Dad.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942 - History

This is a complete list of all Fore River Shipyard production, listed in order by Fore River hull number. Small repair or overhaul jobs that were not assigned hull numbers are not included. During this period the yard was under the ownership of Bethlehem Steel.

This list was compiled and is maintained by Andrew Toppan, using sources listed at the bottom of the document.

The first column is the Fore River hull number, followed by the vessel's name, the type/size/class of the vessel, the owner/customer for the vessel, the type of work done (new construction, overhaul, etc.), the date the vessel was delivered, and the fate or status of the vessel. For ships that remain in existence the current name is listed in the status/fate column if no name is listed, the vessel retains its original name.

For conversions and reconditionings, the vessel's new name (at completion) is listed under "name", the original name and description are listed under "type", and the nature of the conversion is listed under "work type".

Fore River Shipyard Production Record
Hull Name Type/Descr. Owner Work Type Delivered Fate or Status
1398 Charles G. Donoghue 174' Harbor Ferry City of Boston New 23 Sept 1926 Unknown
1399 Daniel A. MacCormack 174' Harbor Ferry City of Boston New 21 Oct 1926 Unknown
1400 Massachusetts
(BB 54)
South Dakota Class Battleship US Navy New -- Cancelled 17 Aug 1923
1401 Governor Carr 150' Harbor Ferry Jamestown & Newport Co. New 14 Feb 1927 Unknown
1402 No. 65 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 17 Jan 1927 Unknown
1403 No. 66 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 9 Feb 1927 Unknown
1404 No. 67 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 9 Apr 1927 Unknown
1405 No. 68 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 9 Apr 1927 Unknown
1406 Unknown
1407 Unknown
1408 Cities Service No. 2 212' Tank Barge Cities Service Co. New 20 Apr 1927 Unknown
1409 Cities Service No. 3 150' Tank Barge Cities Service Co. New 23 Aug 1927 Unknown
1410 Northampton
(CL 26)
Northampton Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 15 May 1930 Torpedoed 30 Nov 1942
1411 Chelan
(WPG 45)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 20 Aug 1928 Discarded 1947
1412 Pontchartrain
(WPG 46)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 10 Oct 1928 Lost 8 Nov 1942
1413 Tahoe
(WPG 47)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 31 Oct 1928 Discarded 1947
1414 Champlain
(WPG 48)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 12 Jan 1929 Discarded 1948
1415 Mendota
(WPG 49)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 16 Mar 1929 Torpedoed 31 Jan 1942
1416 Edward F. Farrington 131' Coastal Freighter Middlesex Transp. Co. New 22 Feb 1928 Unknown
1417 New Bedford 210' Coastal Passenger Steamer New England Steamship Co. (NY,NH&H Ry.) New 19 May 1928 Abandoned 1968
1418 Virginia Lee 302' Passenger Steamer Pennsylvania RR New 25 Oct 1928 Scrapped 1968
1419 Shawmut 122' Trawler Massachusetts Trawler Co. New 5 Nov 1928 Unknown
1420 Trimount 122' Trawler Massachusetts Trawler Co. New 19 Nov 1928 Discarded 1946
1421 William J. O'Brien 122' Trawler Massachusetts Trawler Co. New 18 Dec 1928 Unknown
1422 Berwindglen 367' Collier Wilmore Steamship Co. New 23 July 1929 Barged 1950 Scrapped 1954
1423 Berwindvale 367' Collier Wilmore Steamship Co. New 21 Aug 1929 Scrapped 1952
1424 Naushon 250' Coastal Passenger / Freight Steamer New England Steamship Co. (NY,NH&H Ry.) New 20 May 1929 Scrapped 1974
1425 Seaboard No. 1 165' Tank Barge Seaboard Shipping Corp. New 19 June 1929 Unknown
1426 No-Nox 209' Tank Barge Gulf Refining Co. New 20 Aug 1929 Unknown
1427 Quincy 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 18 Dec 1929 Unknown
1428 Dorchester 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 6 Jan 1930 Unknown
1429 Winthrop 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 26 Dec 1929 Unknown
1430 Portland
(CA 33)
Portland Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Feb 1933 Scrapped 1969
1431 Cities Service No. 4 200' Tank Barge Cities Service Co. New 20 Nov 1929 Unknown
1432 Borinquen 429' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 20 Feb 1931 Wrecked 13 Apr 1970
1433 Dartmouth 110' Trawler General Seafoods Corp. New 27 Jan 1930 Unknown
1434 Amherst 110' Trawler General Seafoods Corp. New 7 Feb 1930 Unknown
1435 Cornell 110' Trawler General Seafoods Corp. New 15 Feb 1930 Unknown
1436 L.T.C. No. 1 201' Tank Barge Lake Tankers Corp. New 30 May 1930 Unknown
1437 L.T.C. No. 2 201' Tank Barge Lake Tankers Corp. New 13 June 1930 Unknown
1438 Virginia Sinclair 435' Tanker Sinclair Navigation Co. New 20 Dec 1930 Torpedoed 10 Mar 1943
1439 Harry F. Sinclair Jr. 435' Tanker Sinclair Navigation Co. New 28 Feb 1931 Torpedoed 11 Apr 1942
1440 Mariposa 631' Passenger Liner Oceanic Steamship Co. New 14 Dec 1931 Scrapped 1974
1441 Monterey 631' Passenger Liner Oceanic Steamship Co. New 29 Apr 1932 Laid Up ( Belofin I )
1442 L.T.C. No. 3 201' Tank Barge Lake Tankers Corp. New 1 July 1930 Unknown
1443 General Sumner 174' Harbor Ferry City of Boston New 6 Jan 1931 Unknown
1444 Antigua 447' Freighter United Mail Steamship Co. New 1 Apr 1932 Scrapped 1964
1445 Quirigua 447' Freighter United Mail Steamship Co. New 4 June 1932 Scrapped 1964
1446 Veragua 447' Freighter United Mail Steamship Co. New 5 Aug 1932 Scrapped 1964
1447 Lurline 631' Passenger Liner Oceanic Steamship Co. New 5 Jan 1933 Scrapped 1987
1448 Farragut
(DD 348)
Farragut Class Destroyer US Navy New 18 June 1934 Scrapped 1947
1449 Vincennes
(CA 44)
New Orleans Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 24 Feb 1937 Torpedoed 9 Aug 1942
1450 Quincy
(CA 39)
New Orleans Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 9 June 1936 Torpedoed 9 Aug 1942
1451 Phelps
(DD 360)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 26 Feb 1936 Scrapped 1947
1452 Clark
(DD 361)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 20 May 1936 Scrapped 1946
1453 Moffett
(DD 362)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 28 Aug 1936 Scrapped 1947
1454 Balch
(DD 363)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 20 Oct 1936 Scrapped 1946
1455 Thomas Whalen 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 9 Oct 1934 Unknown
1456 Atlantic 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 25 Oct 1934 Unknown
1457 Plymouth 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 29 Oct 1934 Unknown
1458 Gridley
(DD 380)
Gridley Class Destroyer US Navy New 24 June 1937 Scrapped 1947
1459 Craven
(DD 382)
Gridley Class Destroyer US Navy New 2 Sept 1937 Scrapped 1947
1460 Wasp
(CV 7)
Wasp Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 25 Apr 1940 Torpedoed 15 Sept 1942
1461 Neptune 110' Trawler Neptune Trawling Co. New 1 Sept 1936 Unknown
1462 Triton 110' Trawler Triton Trawling Co. New 16 Sept 1936 Unknown
1463 Goethals 476' Hopper Dredge US Army Corps of Engineers New 28 Dec 1937 Unknown
1464 Annapolis 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 19 Oct 1937 Unknown
1465 West Point 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 29 Oct 1937 Unknown
1466 Yale 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 26 Nov 1937 Unknown
1467 Panama 493' Freighter Panama RR Co. New 21 Apr 1939 Scrapped 1985
1468 Ancon 493' Freighter Panama RR Co. New 16 June 1939 Scrapped 1973
1469 Cristobal 493' Freighter Panama RR Co. New 11 Aug 1939 Scrapped 1981
1470 Benson
(DD 421)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 25 July 1940 Discarded 1975
1471 Mayo
(DD 422)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 18 Sept 1940 Discarded 1970
1472 Wave 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 18 Nov 1938 Discarded 1945
1473 Crest 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 20 Dec 1938 Unknown
1474 Exporter 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 28 Sept 1939 Scrapped 1971
1475 Explorer 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 16 Nov 1939 Scrapped 1970
1476 Exchange 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 23 Feb 1940 Unknown
1477 Express 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 18 Apr 1940 Unknown
1478 Massachusetts
(BB 59)
South Dakota Class Battleship US Navy New 12 May 1942 Preserved @ Fall River
1479 San Diego
(CL 53)
Atlanta Class Antiaircraft Cruiser US Navy New 10 Jan 1942 Scrapped 1960
1480 San Juan
(CL 54)
Atlanta Class Antiaircraft Cruiser US Navy New 28 Feb 1942 Scrapped 1962
1481 Exemplar 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 1 Aug 1940 Unknown (USS Dorothea L. Dix (AP 67))
1482 Exhibitor 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 5 Sept 1940 Unknown
1483 Executor 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 22 Oct 1940 Unknown (USS Almaack (AKA 10))
1484 Examiner 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 23 Jan 1942 Unknown
1485 Stanvac Calcutta 501' Tanker Petroluem Shipping Co. (Standard Vacuum Co.) New 1 May 1941 Sunk 6 June 1942
1486 Stanvac Capetown 501' Tanker Petroluem Shipping Co. (Standard Vacuum Co.) New 27 June 1941 Scrapped 1960
1487 Stanvac Manila 501' Tanker Petroluem Shipping Co. (Standard Vacuum Co.) New 1 Aug 1941 Torpedoed 23 May 1943
1488 Sinclair Opaline 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 16 Aug 1941 Scrapped 1961
1489 Sinclair Rubilene 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 20 Sept 1941 Scrapped 1959
1490 Sinclair Superflame 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 7 Nov 1941 Scrapped 1966
1491 Sinclair H-C 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 6 Jan 1942 Discarded 1980's
1492 Flagship Sinco 529' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 30 Jan 1942 Scrapped 1970
1493 Sheldon Clark 529' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 28 Mar 1942 Scrapped 1973
1494 Baltimore
(CA 68)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Apr 1943 Discarded 1971
1495 Boston
(CA 69)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 30 June 1943 Scrapped 1975
1496 Canberra
(CA 70)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 14 Oct 1943 Scrapped 1980
1497 Quincy
(CA 71)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Dec 1943 Discarded 1973
1498 Vincennes
(CL 64)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 21 Jan 1944 Target 28 Oct 1969
1499 Pasadena
(CL 65)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 8 June 1944 Discarded 1970
1500 Springfield
(CL 66)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 8 Sept 1944 Discarded 1978
1501 Topeka
(CL 67)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 23 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1975
1502 Providence
(CL 82)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 14 May 1945 Discarded 1978
1503 Mancester
(CL 83)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 25 Oct 1946 Scrapped 1960
1504 Pittsburgh
(CA 72)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 9 Oct 1944 Discarded 1973
1505 Saint Paul
(CA 73)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 16 Feb 1945 Discarded 1978
1506 Columbus
(CA 74)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 8 June 1945 Discarded 1976
1507 Helena
(CA 75)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 3 Sept 1945 Discarded 1974
1508 Lexington
(CV 16)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 17 Feb 1943 Preserved @ Corpus Christi
1509 Bunker Hill
(CV 17)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 24 May 1943 Scrapped 1974
1510 Wasp
(CV 18)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 24 Nov 1943 Scrapped 1973
1511 Hancock
(CV 19)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 15 Apr 1944 Discarded 1976
1512 Cohasset 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 9 Oct 1941 Unknown
1513 Lynn 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 22 Oct 1941 Unknown
1514 Salem 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 6 Nov 1941 Unknown
1515 Weymouth 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 26 Nov 1941 Unknown
1516 Bancroft
(DD 598)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 30 Apr 1942 Discarded 1971
1517 Barton
(DD 599)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 29 May 1942 Torpedoed 13 Nov 1942
1518 Boyle
(DD 600)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 15 Aug 1942 Discarded 1971
1519 Champlin
(DD 601)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 12 Sept 1942 Discarded 1971
1520 Nields
(DD 616)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 15 Jan 1943 Discarded 1971
1521 Ordronaux
(DD 617)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 13 Feb 1943 Discarded 1971
1522 LST 361 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 16 Nov 1942 Scrapped 1947
1523 LST 362 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 23 Nov 1942 Torpedoed 2 March 1944
1524 LST 363 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 30 Nov 1942 Scrapped 1948
1525 LST 364 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 7 Dec 1942 Lost 2/1945
1526 LST 365 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 14 Dec 1942 Discarded 1947
1527 LST 366 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 21 Dec 1942 Scrapped 1947
1528 LST 367 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 29 Dec 1942 Scrapped 1948
1529 LST 368 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 4 Jan 1943 Destroyed 16 June 1948
1530 LST 369 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 8 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1531 LST 370 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 13 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1532 LST 371 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 16 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1533 LST 372 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 23 Jan 1943 Scrapped 1947
1534 LST 373 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 27 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1535 LST 374 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 29 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1536 LST 375 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 2 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1949
1537 LST 376 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 5 Feb 1943 Torpedoed 9 June 1944
1538 LST 377 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 8 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1948
1539 LST 378 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 10 Feb 1943 Discarded 1947
1540 LST 379 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 12 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1948
1541 LST 380 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 15 Feb 1943 Discarded 1946
1542 LST 381 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 15 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1947
1543 LST 382 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 18 Feb 1943 Discarded 1948
1544 Oregon City
(CA 122)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Feb 1946 Discarded 1970
1545 Albany
(CA 123)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 14 June 1946 Scrapped 1990
1546 Rochester
(CA 124)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 19 Dec 1946 Discarded 1973
1547 Northampton
(CA 125)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945 Discarded 1977
1548 Cambridge
(CA 126)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1549 Bridgeport
(CA 127)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1550 Kansas City
(CA 128)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1551 Tulsa
(CA 129)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1552 Weber
(DE 675)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 30 June 1943 Target 15 July 1962
1553 Schmitt
(DE 676)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 24 July 1943 Discarded 1976
1554 Frament
(DE 677)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 15 Aug 1943 Discarded 1960
1555 Harmon
(DE 678)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 31 Aug 1943 Scrapped 1967
1556 Greenwood
(DE 679)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 25 Sept 1943 Scrapped 1967
1557 Loeser
(DE 680)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 10 Oct 1943 Target 1960's
1558 Gillette
(DE 681)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 27 Oct 1943 Scrapped 1973
1559 Underhill
(DE 682)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 15 Nov 1943 Torpedoed 24 July 1945
1560 Henry R. Kenyon
(DE 683)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 30 Nov 1943 Scrapped 1970
1561 DeLong
(DE 684)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 31 Dec 1943 Target 19 Feb 1970
1562 Coates
(DE 685)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 24 Jan 1944 Target 19 Sept 1971
1563 Eugene E. Elmore
(DE 686)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 4 Feb 1944 Scrapped 1969
1564 Kline
(APD 120)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 18 Oct 1944 In Service (Taiwanese Shou Shan )
1565 Raymon W. Herndon
(APD 121)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 3 Nov 1944 Discared 1976
1566 Scribner
(APD 122)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 20 Nov 1944 Scrapped 1967
1567 Alex Diachenko
(APD 123)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 8 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1975
1568 Horace A. Bass
(APD 124)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 21 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1975
1569 Wantuck
(APD 125)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 30 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1958
1570 Philippine Sea
(CV 47)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 3 May 1946 Scrapped 1971
1571 Des Moines
(CA 134)
Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Nov 1948 Stricken 1991 Pending Disposal
1572 Salem
(CA 139)
Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 9 May 1949 Preserved @ Quincy
1573 Dallas
(CA 140)
Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 10 June 1946
1574 CA 141 Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 7 Jan 1946
1575 CA 142 Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1576 Joseph P. Kennedy Jr.
(DD 850)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 14 Dec 1945 Preserved @ Fall River
1577 Rupertus
(DD 851)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 8 Mar 1946 Discarded 1995
1578 Leonard F. Mason
(DD 852)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 28 June 1946 In Service (Taiwanese Sui Yang )
1579 Charles H, Roan
(DD 853)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 12 Sept 1946 Scrapped 1995
1580 LST 1004 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 28 Mar 1944 Scrapped 1947
1581 LST 1005 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 6 Apr 1944 Wrecked 1946
1582 LST 1006 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 12 Apr 1944 Discarded 1948
1583 LST 1007 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 15 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1584 LST 1008 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 18 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1585 LST 1009 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 22 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1586 LST 1010 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 25 Apr 1944 In Service (South Korean Un Bong )
1587 LST 1011 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 28 Apr 1944 Scrapped 1948
1588 LST 1012 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 30 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1589 LST 1013 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 2 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1590 LST 1014 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 5 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1591 LST 1015 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 7 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1592 LST 1016 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 10 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1593 LST 1017 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 12 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1594 LST 1018 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 14 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1595 LST 1019 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 17 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1596 LST 1020 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 19 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1597 LST 1021 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 24 May 1944 Discarded 1947
1598 LST 1022 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 24 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1599 LST 1023 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 26 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1600 LST 1024 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 28 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1601 LST 1025 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 31 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1602 LST 1026 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 7 June 1944 Discarded 1947
1603 LST 1027 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 7 June 1944 Discarded 1947
1604 CA 143 Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1605 CV 50 Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New -- Cancelled 27 Mar 1945
1606 Basilone
(DDE 824)
Gearing Class Destroyer (Incomplete) US Navy Completion as Epperson Class Escort Destroyer 21 July 1949 Discarded 1977
1607 Pennsylvania 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 5 Aug 1949 Scrapped 1985
1608 Texas 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 31 Aug 1949 Scrapped 1986
1609 Ohio 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 21 Oct 1949 Scrapped 1985
1610 Kentucky 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 26 Oct 1949 Scrapped 1985
1611 World Liberty 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker World Tankers Co. (Niarchos) New 30 Nov 1949 Collision 12 March 1966 Scrapped
1612 Northampton
(CLC 1)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser (Incomplete) US Navy Completion as Northampton Class Tactical Command Ship 28 Feb 1953 Discarded 1977
1613 Capsa 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 11 Jan 1950 Scrapped 1976
1614 Capulus 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 15 Mar 1950 Scrapped 1975
1615 Caperata 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 12 Apr 1950 Scrapped 1976
1616 Caprella 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 14 June 1950 Scrapped 1977
1617 Caprinus 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 14 Sept 1950 Scrapped 1978
1618 Independence 682' Passenger Liner American Export Lines New 11 Jan 1951 In Service
1619 Constitution 682' Passenger Liner American Export Lines New 7 June 1951 Lost 24 Nov 1997
1620 Willis A. Lee
(DL 4)
Mitscher Class Frigate US Navy New 29 Sept 1954 Scrapped 1973
1621 Wilkinson
(DL 5)
Mitscher Class Frigate US Navy New 29 July 1954 Scrapped 1975
1622 Old Colony Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 28 Oct 1952 Scrapped 1980
1623 Cornhusker Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 5 Jan 1953 Wrecked 7 July 1953 Scrapped
1624 Pine Tree Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 3 Apr 1953 Unknown ( Mariposa )
1625 Nutmeg Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 9 Sept 1953 Wrecked 8 oct 1961
1626 Wolverine Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 30 Oct 1953 Unknown ( Arizona )
1627 Failaika 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Afran Transport Co. (Gulf) New 3 July 1952 Scrapped 1980
1628 La Cruz 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Afran Transport Co. (Gulf) New 18 Sept 1952 Scrapped 1980
1629 Waneta 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Brilliant Transport Co. (Socony- Vacuum Oil Co.) New 11 Dec 1952 Scrapped 1977
1630 Chryssi 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Santander Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 26 Feb 1953 Sunk 26 Dec 1970
1631 Andros Island 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Rio Venturado Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 7 May 1953 Scrapped 1975
1632 Andros Hills 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Rio Venturado Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 12 Aug 1953 Scrapped 1972
1633 Neosho
(AO 143)
Neosho Class Fleet Oiler US Navy New 17 Sept 1954 Stricken 1994
1634 Orion Comet 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Oil Carriers Joint Venture (Orion) New 16 Oct 1953 Lost 12/1976
1635 Master Peter 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Bilbao Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 8 Oct 1954 Scrapped 1977
1636 George Livanos 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Atlantic Oil Carriers Ltd. (Livanos) New 11 Jan 1954 Scrapped 1976
1637 Athina Livanos 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Atlantic Oil Carriers Ltd. (Livanos) New 9 Sept 1954 Scrapped 1977
1638 Marine Dow-Chem 16,600 DWT, 551' Chemical Tanker Marine Chemicals Transport Co. New 26 Mar 1954 Barged 1974
1639 World Glory 45,500 DWT, 736' Tanker World Tankers Co. (Niarchos) New 19 Aug 1954 Sunk 14 June 1968
1640 Unknown
1641 Unknown
1642 Contract Transferred to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1643 Margarita 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Afran Transport Co. (Gulf) New 15 July 1954 Scrapped 1979
1644 -- 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Reconquista Compania Panamena de Naviera (Konialidis) New -- Cancelled
1645 Unknown
1646 Unknown
1647 Socony-Vacuum 27,000 DWT, 604' Tanker Socony- Vacuum Oil Co. New 3 Dec 1954 Scrapped 1985
1648 Decatur
(DD 936)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 30 Nov 1956 In Service (ex- Decatur )
1649 Davis
(DD 937)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 28 Feb 1957 Scrapped 1996
1650 Jonas Ingram
(DD 938)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 10 July 1957 Target 20 July 1988
1651 Blandy
(DD 943)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 20 Nov 1957 Scrapped 1996
1652 Mullinix
(DD 944)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 26 Feb 1958 Target 22 Aug 1992
1653 -- Offshore Radar Platform - Georges Bank Station US Navy / US Air Force New 13 June 1955 Demolished 1963-1964
1654 Mobilgas 27,000 DWT, 604' Tanker Charles Kurz & Co. New 17 May 1956 Scrapped 1984
1655 World Beauty 45,500 DWT, 736' Tanker World Beauty Corp. (Niarchos) New 18 Apr 1957 Scrapped 1977
1656 Farragut
(DLG 6)
Farragut Class Frigate US Navy New 8 Dec 1960 Stricken 1992
1657 Luce
(DLG 7)
Farragut Class Frigate US Navy New 11 May 1961 Stricken 1992
1658 Macdonough
(DLG 8)
Farragut Class Frigate US Navy New 29 Oct 1961 Stricken 1992
1659 Mobil Fuel 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Kurz Tankers New Unknown Laid Up ( Meacham )
1660 Mobil Power 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Kurz Tankers New 27 Sept 1957 Laid Up ( Naeco )
1661 Olympic Eagle 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Greenwich Panama, S.A. (Onassis) New 27 Aug 1958 Scrapped 1979
1662 Olympic Falcon 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Occidental Shipping Co., S.A. (Onassis) New 8 Dec 1958 Scrapped 1979
1663 Mobil Lube 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Socony Mobil Oil Co. New 10 Jan 1958 Scrapped 1983
1664 -- 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Bahama Marine S.A. (Onassis) New -- Cancelled 25 Nov 1957
1665 Princes Sophie 71,000 DWT, 859' Tanker World Brilliance Corp. (Niarchos) New 18 Mar 1959 Scrapped 1977
1666 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1667 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1668 Transeastern 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Transeastern Shipping Corp. New 30 July 1959 Scrapped 1995
1669 Long Beach
(CGN 9)
Long Beach Class Guided Missile Cruiser US Navy New 1 Sept 1961 Stricken 1995 Pending Scrapping
1670 -- 106,000 DWT, 940' Tanker Goldensea Panama, S.A. (Onassis) New -- Cancelled 25 Nov 1957
1671 Mount Vernon Victory 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Mount Vernon Tanker Co. (Onassis) New 27 Jan 1961 Laid Up ( Mount Vernon )
1672 Monticello Victory 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Monticello Tanker Co. (Onassis) New Unk. Burned 31 May 1981 Scrapped 1984
1673 Patro 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Hercules Tankers Corp./Tanker Owners, S.A. New 20 Feb 1959 Scrapped 1979
1674 Capulonix 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Hercules Tankers Corp./Asiatic Petroleum Corp. New 25 Sept 1959 Scrapped 1979
1675 Capiluna 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Hercules Tankers Corp./Asiatic Petroleum Corp. New 21 Oct 1960 Scrapped 1980
1676 Leland I. Doan 16,500 DWT, 551' Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Marine Interests Corp. New 3 Feb 1961 Scrapped 1985
1677 Bainbridge
(DLGN 25)
Bainbridge Class Frigate US Navy New 28 Aug 1962 Stricken 1995 Pending Scrapping
1678 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1679 Manhattan 106,500 DWT, 940' Tanker Manhattan Tankers Co. (Niarchos) New 15 Jan 1962 Scrapped 1987
1680 Orion Hunter 67,000 DWT, 860' Tanker Colonial Tankers Corp. (Orion) New 20 Dec 1961 Scrapped 1989
1681 -- 106,500 DWT, 940' Tanker 1681 Corp./ Victory Carriers (Onassis) New -- Cancelled 9 June 1961
1682 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1683 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1684 American Courier 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New 8 Feb 1963 Scrapped 1986
1685 American Commander 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New 17 Apr 1963 Laid Up ( Pioneer Commander )
1686 American Corsair 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New 7 June 1963 Scrapped 1686
1687 American Contractor 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New Unk. Laid Up ( Pioneer Contractor )
1688 American Contender 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New Unk. Unknown
1689 American Crusader 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New Unk. Laid Up ( Pioneer Crusader )
1690 Montpelier Victory 47,000 DWT, 736' Tanker 1681 Corp./ Victory Carriers (Onassis) New 25 Oct 1962 Scrapped 1985
1691 Mount Washington 47,000 DWT, 736' Tanker 1681 Corp./ Victory Carriers (Onassis) New 31 Oct 1963 In Reserve
1692 Whale
(SSN 638)
Sturgeon Class Attack Submarine Built by General Dynamics / Quincy Shipbuilding Division
1693 Sunfish
(SSN 649)
Sturgeon Class Attack Submarine Built by General Dynamics / Quincy Shipbuilding Division

Major Sources:
List of Ships Built at the Quincy Yard . Central Technical Department of Bethlehem Steel Company, Shipbuilding Division, Quincy, MA., with unofficial addenda.

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships . Naval Historical Center, Washington, D.C., 1959-1991.

Special thanks to Michael Pryce for providing many ship fates, and to everyone who has provided updated information about these ships.


Contents

Shortly after the Quincy was assigned to Cruiser Division 8 (CruDiv8 Atlantic Fleet ), she was called up for her first deployment to the Mediterranean on July 20, 1936, to protect American interests in Spain during the Spanish Civil War . On July 26th, the Quincy passed the Strait of Gibraltar and reached Málaga a day later . During its mission, the ship formed an international rescue fleet together with the Deutschland , the Admiral Scheer and the Admiral Graf Spee . During this time, the Quincy rescued a total of 490 refugees to Marseille and Villefranche-sur-Mer (France) until it was replaced by the Raleigh on September 27 .

On October 5, the Quincy returned to the Boston Naval Shipyard to prepare for the final acceptance process, which took place March 15-18, 1937. On April 12, the ship set out for the Pacific to join Cruiser Division 7 . She crossed the Panama Canal April 23-27 and reached Pearl Harbor on May 10th.

The Quincy took part in a tactical exercise with the Pacific Fleet on May 20, the first of many maneuvers the Quincy completed in 1937 and 1938. From March 15 to April 28, she participated in an important battle exercise of the Pacific Fleet off Hawaii , the " Fleet problem XIX". After an overhaul at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard , the Quincy took part in her division's tactical operations off San Clemente , California. On January 4, 1939, the Quincy was finally ordered to the North Atlantic , where she patrolled the remainder of 1939. With the Atlantic fleet, she took part in the “Fleet Problem XX” from February 13th to 26th.


USS Quincy (i) (CA 39)

USS Quincy (Captain Samuel Nobre Moore, USN) was sunk during the Battle of Savo Island.379 of her crew died and 650 survived though 220 were wounded All the survivors were picked up by USS Bagley/Buchanan/Ellet and the Wilson. Amongst those killed was the Commanding Officer Moore.

Commands listed for USS Quincy (i) (CA 39)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Capt. Paul Henry Bastedo, USN4 Dec 193715 Dec 1939
2Capt. Williams Carter Wickham, USN15 Dec 19391 Jul 1941
3Capt. Charlton Eugene Battle, Jr., USN1 Jul 194120 May 1942
4Capt. Samuel Nobre Moore, USN20 May 19429 Aug 1942 (+)

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Notable events involving Quincy (i) include:

9 Aug 1942
The Quincy was sunk along with the USS Vincennes, Astoria and the HMAS Canberra during the Japanese attempt to interdict the invasion force at Guadalcanal. The Quincy fought bravely, firing even as she slipped beneath the waves with a good portion of her crew including her Captain Samuel Moore.

Media links


The Shame of Savo
Loxton, Bruce with Coulthard-Clark, Chris


QUINCY CA 39

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    New Orleans Class Cruiser
    Keel Laid 15 November 1933 - Launched 19 June 1935

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942 - History

According to our records New York was his home or enlistment state and Westchester County included within the archival record. We have Yonkers listed as the city. He had enlisted in the United States Navy. Served during World War II. Castaldo had the rank of Enlisted. His military occupation or specialty was Seaman First Class. Service number assignment was 2239149. Attached to USS Quincy (CA-39). During his service in World War II, Navy enlisted man Castaldo was reported missing and ultimately declared dead on August 9, 1942 . Recorded circumstances attributed to: Missing in action or lost at sea. Incident location: Waters off Savo Island, Solomon Islands, South Pacific.

Dominick N Castaldo was reported Missing in Action on August 9, 1942 while serving on the USS Quincy during the Battle of Savo Island. He was officially declared dead on August 10, 1943.

The Battle of Savo Island, also known as the First Battle of Savo Island, was a naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II between the Imperial Japanese Navy and Allied naval forces. The battle took place on August 8–9, 1942 and was the first major naval engagement of the Guadalcanal campaign. The battle has often been cited as the worst defeat in a fair fight in the history of the United States Navy. The battle was the first of five costly, large scale sea and air-sea actions fought in support of the ground battles on Guadalcanal.

The USS Quincy and USS Vincennes was sunk, with over 1000 men killed or lost at sea. The Japanese suffered only light damage to ships, and a little more than 100 casualties.

Dominick Nicholas Castaldo is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines. This is an American Battle Monuments Commission location.


Watch the video: USS Quincy: Ghost of Savo Island (May 2022).