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Brasidas Timeline

Brasidas Timeline

  • 425 BCE

    Athenians capture Pylos. Spartan general Brasidas is injured in attempting to retake the city.

  • 424 BCE

    Spartan general Brasidas takes Amphipolis, Thucydides failed to prevent this and is exiled.

  • 424 BCE

    Spartan Brasidas' campaign in Thrace.

  • 422 BCE

    Spartan general Brasidas employs Myrkinian and Chalkidian peltasts to defeat a force of Athenian hoplites at Amphipolis.

  • 422 BCE

    The Athenians, led by Cleon, try to retake Amphipolis but are defeated by Brasidas.

  • 422 BCE

    Spartan general Brasidas dies of his wounds at Amphipolis.


History [ edit ]

The UNSC Brasidas participated in the Battle of Earth on October 20, 2552. During the Battle of Mombasa, Brasidas fired one of its Magnetic Accelerator Cannons from orbit towards the surface of Earth to disable a Type-47A Scarab in the city of Mombasa, Africa on Earth. With the Scarab disabled, UNSC Marines engaged the Scarab's surviving personnel in an attempt to recover the walker. ΐ]

The Brasidas was part of Admiral Carl Patterson's battle group sent to Onyx to retrieve Dr. Catherine Halsey as well as the SPARTAN-IIs and IIIs stationed on the planet. During the first attack on Covenant ships of Voro Nar 'Mantakree's Second Fleet of Homogeneous Clarity in orbit during the Onyx Conflict, the Brasidas was damaged extensively, suffering damage to its reactor. It then transferred its load of HORNET mines to the prowler UNSC Dusk. Γ] It was destroyed along with the UNSC Stalingrad and rest of the battle group when Covenant reinforcements swarmed into the Zeta Doradus system. Β]


Electric Cars mainstream since the 1970es

I'd think that hydrogen fuel cells would be more plausible than a battery electric vehicle in that time period. You're unlikely to get batteries with sufficient density for a commuter vehicle, but a rather expensive vehicle with an electric motor powered by fuel cells would be possible.

That said, you'd need to get the hydrogen in the first place. Go with some combination of coal and natural gas processes? You'd have less dependance on foreign oil, but it wouldn't be the most greenhouse gas-friendly fuel source.

I'd think that hydrogen fuel cells would be more plausible than a battery electric vehicle in that time period. You're unlikely to get batteries with sufficient density for a commuter vehicle, but a rather expensive vehicle with an electric motor powered by fuel cells would be possible.

That said, you'd need to get the hydrogen in the first place. Go with some combination of coal and natural gas processes? You'd have less dependance on foreign oil, but it wouldn't be the most greenhouse gas-friendly fuel source.

Apollo 20

I think you're reaching back to the early to mid part of the century for this to be feasible with electric cars either failing to disappear completely or manufacturers chase after them on their own either because of a perceived potential military use that subsidizes development or some perception that they have economic potential.

If you want simple oil dependence, a better bet is natural gas, of which the US has an abundance and which is a byproduct of oil exploration, which keeps the oil companies happy by using something they often burn off. Gas powered vehicles existed as early as the 1930s.

Marathag

The best way to use hydrogen is to use the hydrogen with some carbon atoms added. CNG is far far easier to store and transport.

Plus, it works with simple carburetors and feedback controls optional

Pattersonautobody

Maybe a Germany beats Russia POD. They will invent electric U-Boats and be far away from nuclear power.

So, this might allow for significant advancements in battery technology where maybe we can get Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries by the 70s. these are necessary to make electric cars doable.

Then you need something disastrous to happen to crude oil (i.e. nuked Middle East) so that nuclear and coal power are better options and charging cars is more effective that using whatever little oil is left.

Delta Force

MattII

Baldipaul

Lost Freeway

Bphillip54

I had a thought to encourage the infrastructure much earlier.

In the early days of motorcars, electrics were not uncommon. So, suppose the trolley car lines, to generate revenue from those rich enough to afford cars, provided charging stations in the city, so someone could drive to town, plug in their car while they did their business, and have a full battery when it was time to go home?

Is there any change that this would make the electrics desirable enough to spur battery development earlier?

Roger II

Delta Force

Why would they do that? You can profit by maximizing profit margins or maximizing sales. As an inelastic resource, the best way to profit is to maximize margins.

In terms of weight, petroleum has twice the energy density of coal, 48 MJ per kilogram of fuel oil versus 24 MJ per kilogram. One liter of petroleum weighs 0.88 kilograms, and there are almost 159 liters in a barrel of petroleum. That gives a weight of 139.92 kilograms per barrel of petroleum.

Coal is priced is short tons, which are equivalent to around 907 kilograms. Using density equivalence, it takes 3.24 barrels of petroleum to equal the energy content of a short ton of coal. Thus, a barrel of petroleum must cost 30.86% as much as a short ton of coal for it to be competitive for power generation.

Coal is currently priced at $43.50 per short ton, which means petroleum would have to cost $13.42 per barrel to remain competitive for electricity generation, excluding transportation costs, etc. Checking here, in the period since the end of World War II petroleum has never been that inexpensive except for a brief period in the late 1990s.

However, petroleum was used for 20% of United States energy generation during the little-known Bandwagon Market for petroleum fired electric generation that took place between 1965 and 1973, and petroleum and coal had largely the same margins. Under some conditions petroleum might work out.

The larger issue though is that petroleum is inelastic and is still selling quite well at prices higher than those seen since 1973. I doubt they could make as much money as they do now even with petroleum being sold for electric generation.

Dathi THorfinnsson

Ya. This is just not going to happen, at least without massive, massive timeline changes.

Batteries back then were awful. You'd have to go with lead acid batteries, and they were/are very heavy for the amount of power you can store in them.

Electronics tended to use NiCds and then NiMH batteries, but they (especially the former) have real problems with recharging cycles - if you don't use them to depletion, the amount of storage drops. And in cars, you'd sure have to recharge BEFORE you hit empty.

Also, Cadmium is somewhat poisonous, so would be a problem in a crash.

-------
As for fuel cells. Ha. They were pretty immature then, and Hydrogen is a REAL pain to store. Actually the best methods they were coming up with were adsorption in a metal matrix, not pressurized.

I had a quick look at this a while ago - you can get a useful city runabout with lead-acid batteries any time from the 1960s onwards. Four seats or two people and a boot full of shopping, 50 miles range, 30 miles per hour. Not a lot, but adequate for most journeys for most people.

More nuclear power might help here, since the poor load-following abilities of the electrical supply encourage low off-peak tariffs that can be used to charge the car more cheaply.

The trick is selling it. You either need it to be a second car, or to have people accept that long trips mean using public transport. Either requires people to look at cars somewhat differently.

Bookmark95

I know about a guy named Victor Wouk who designed a hybrid car as early as 1974. The EPA created a project to recruit engineers build a car that got far less emissions than other cars.

Wouk was the only man who met their criteria, with a hybrid built out of a Buick Skylark.

But an EPA official didn't think hybrids were practical, so the project got nowhere.

If the EPA official had approved, I imagine hybrid cars could have been on the road as early as 1981.


A mercantile class arose in the first half of the 7th century BC, shown by the introduction of coinage in about 680 BC.

In Sparta, the Messenian Wars resulted in the conquest of Messenia and the enserfment of the Messenians, beginning in the latter half of the 8th century BC. This was an unprecedented act in ancient Greece, which led to a social revolution in which the subjugated population of helots farmed and labored for Sparta, whilst every Spartan male citizen became a soldier of the Spartan Army permanently in arms. Rich and poor citizens alike were obliged to live and train as soldiers, equality which defused social conflict. These reforms, attributed to Lycurgus of Sparta, were probably complete by 650 BC.


2 Answers 2

(1) One account of the Danaan invasion of Ireland has it that upon landing, they burned their ships, causing a great mist to rise up and terrifying the inhabitants who thought the Danaans arrived in a cloud.

(2) In Book V of the Aeneid, the Trojan women attempt to burn the ships after they arrive on Sicily, but a rainstorm thwarts their plans.

(3) In 351 BC, Sidon rebelled against Ochus, the King of Persia. They burned all the ships in the harbor to prevent anyone from fleeing. When it became clear that the city had been betrayed and the Persians were entering, they set fire to their own homes and the entire city was obliterated.

(4) In 296, the Praetorian Prefect, Asclepiodotus, commanded an army belonging to the emperor Constantius Chlorus, and led it against the usurper Allectus. Having arrived in Britain to confront Allectus, Asclepiodotus burned his own ships to prevent his men from retreating.

(5) In 363, Julian the Apostate, Emperor of Rome invaded Persia. After his army crossed the Tigris he had all the pontoons and barges burned so there would be no thought of going back.

(6) In 711, Tariq ibn Ziyad, for whom Gibraltar is named, landed there, burned his ships and embarked on the conquest of Spain.

(7) Some accounts claim that William the Duke of Normandy burnt his ships on arriving in England in 1066.

(8) In 1169, a group of about 250 English freebooters under the bastards Robert Fitz-Stephen, Meiler Fitz-Henry, and Meiler Fitz-David, along with a vassal of king Henry, named Hervey Montmorency, raided Wexford, and having been repulsed they were so ashamed, they burnt their ships and determined to succeed or die trying.

(9) Hernando Cortez supposedly burned his ships in 1519 to prevent anyone returning to Cuba and reporting his mutiny to the Spanish governor there.

(10) According to a book published in 1689, which purported to be the journal of a pirate named Raveneau de Lussan, he at one point led his men across the isthmus of the Americas through Honduras after first burning their ship to prevent anyone from defecting.

(11) In 1779, during the celebrated battle between John Paul Jones and the English ship of the line, Serapis, rather than flee or surrender Jones desparately kamikazeed his sinking ship into the Serapis and captured it va banque.

(12) In 1789, sailors serving on the HMS Bounty under the notorious Captain Bly mutinied and sailed to Pitcairn Island where they burned the Bounty.


Personality and characteristics

Brasidas was a Spartan nationalist and was proud of his Spartan heritage. As a highly skilled military officer within the Spartan army, Brasidas displayed rational thought and unlike most Spartans, Brasidas often prefers to use diplomacy and strategics whenever violence was never necessary. However, Brasidas would resort to brutal violence when left with no choice. Brasidas also values his friendships with those who prove their loyalty to him and to Sparta, such as Kassandra or Myrinne. ⎘]

In the simulation of the Underworld, Brasidas had grown disillusioned by his former Spartan nationalism as it only damned him to Tartaros instead of rewarded him with a happy afterlife in Elysium. By reuniting with Kassandra, who was on a pilgrimage to master the Staff of Hermes, Brasidas was able to come to grip with his past and takes solace in the fact that he hopes to one day be truly worthy of redemption for his actions. ⎗]

Equipment and skills

Brasidas was a highly skilled combatant and a profound military strategist. Brasidas was able to use his spear and shield in tandem with each other, which combined with his rigorously trained Spartan physical conditioning makes him a fierce warrior on his own right. He was able to easily slaughter a group of the Monger's men before working in tandem with Kassandra to finish off the rest of the Monger's men.


Archidamian War

Archidamian War: name of the first part of the Peloponnesian War (431-404), the great conflict between Athens and Sparta. It is called after the Spartan king Archidamus II. This war started in 431 and ended in 421 with something that came close to an Athenian victory and a Spartan defeat. However, Athenian diplomatic mistakes, Spartan intransigence, and a catastrophic Athenian attempt to conquer the island of Sicily were enough to change the balance of power, so that Sparta got a second chance: the Decelean or Ionian War.

The Archidamian War did not start without serious disturbances in the Greek balance of power. In 433, Athens had concluded an alliance with Corcyra (modern Corfu more. ), and had started to besiege Potidaea. This threatened to reduce Corinth, until then an important city, to a third-rank power. To Sparta, this was dangerous: it needed the Corinthian navy.

The Spartans started to fear that Athens was becoming too powerful but still tried to prevent war. Peace was possible, they said, when Athens would revoke an economical decree against Megara, a Spartan ally. The Athenian leader Pericles refused this, because Sparta and Athens had once agreed that conflicts would be solved by arbitration. If the Athenians would yield to Sparta's request to revoke the Megarian Decree, they would in fact allow Sparta to give orders to Athens. This was unacceptable, and war broke out between two regional empires: Athens and its Delian League, and Sparta and its Peloponnesian League.

When Sparta declared war, it announced that it did so to liberate Greece from Athenian oppression. And with some justification, because Athens had converted the Delian League, which had once been meant as a defensive alliance against the Persian Empire, into an Athenian empire.

To achieve victory, Sparta had to force Athens into some kind of surrender on the other hand, Athens simply had to survive the attacks. Pericles' strategy was to evacuate the countryside, leave it to the Spartans, and concentrate everyone in the city itself, which could receive supplies from across the sea. Cattle, for example, could be kept on the isle of Euboea. As long as the "Long walls" connected the city to its port Piraeus, as long as Athens ruled the waves, and as long as Athens was free to strike from the sea against Sparta's coastal allies, it could create great tensions within the Spartan alliance.

/> Fragment of the Athenian Tribute List, 425-424 BCE

So, the Athenian position was better than that of their enemies, and it comes as no surprise that the Spartans immediately asked for help in Persia. This is only recorded by Diodorus, who mentions that the Spartans did not just declare war, but decided to declare war and ask for help in Persia. note [Diodorus, World History 12.41.1.] Thucydides also admits, much later, that the Spartans sent an embassy to the east. They failed to achieve their aim, because they were captured by the Athenians (text).

War broke out when the Thebans, without declaration of war, attempted to capture Plataea during a nightly attack (text). If it had succeeded, Theban armies could easier move to the Peloponnese, and Peloponnesian armies would have been capable of marching to Boeotia. However, the operation was a failure, and Plataea was to be a major bone of contention for some time.

In 431 and 430, the Spartan king Archidamus II invaded Attica (the countryside of Athens) and laid waste large parts of it. The Athenian admiral Phormio retaliated with attacks on the Spartan navy (text). However, it soon became apparent that Pericles' strategy was too expensive, and the Athenian leader was deposed. Worse was to come, because in 429, a terrible plague (probably typhoid fever) took away about a third of the Athenian citizens, including Pericles. At the same time, the Spartans laid siege to Plataea (text), which fell in 427.

/> Spear butt from Lesbos, dedicated in Athens to the Dioscuri

Believing that Athens was about to collapse, the island of Lesbos revolted and Archidamus invaded Attica again. However, the Athenians were not defeated at all. They suppressed the revolt (427) and at the same time embarked upon a more aggressive policy, invading western Greece and launching a small expedition to Sicily to gain support from the far west. At the same time, general Nicias seized the small island Minoa, which controlled the port of Megara. In the following year, the same Nicias pillaged the isle of Melos, and the countryside of Tanagra and Locris at the same time, the Athenian commander Demosthenes wanted to attack central Greece from the west, but he failed.

/> Sphacteria (left), seen from the northeast, and the Pylos peninsula (right).

The Athenian statesman Cleon was able to triple the tribute that the Athenians received, enabling the Athenian commanders to undertake more daring actions.

In 425, Demosthenes and Cleon captured 292 Spartan soldiers on the island Sphacteria (text). The Athenians also built a fortress at Pylos, where they could receive runaway slaves and helots. This did great damage to the Spartan economy.

For the Spartans, invading Attica was no longer an option (the POWs would be executed), but they had in the meantime captured Plataea, which controlled the way to Thebes and beyond. Proceeding along this road, the Spartans reached Thessaly and Macedonia and started to attack Athenian possessions in the northern Aegean.

The Spartan Brasidas provoked rebellions in this area and captured the strategically important Athenian colony of Amphipolis (text). The Athenian commander Thucydides, who was too late to save this town, was punished with exile and became this war's historian.

/> Bronze head of Nike (Victory),
dedicated in 420-415

Another disaster that befell the Athenians was a defeat by the hands of the Thebans at Delium. Not much later, an armistice of a year was signed (423-422).

When it had expired and the Athenian war leader Cleon and the Spartan general Brasidas were both killed in action during an Athenian attempt to recover Amphipolis, both sides were ready for peace: the Peace of Nicias, which had already been satirized by the comedian Aristophanes before it had been signed (text).

Athens had survived and won the Archidamian War. However, Sparta had not been decisively defeated and was - although it regretted that it had attacked Athens - still very strong. And this humiliated superpower was looking for an opportunity to show that it was still a power to be reckoned with. It did not have to wait very long.


Ancient Greece (1100 BC - 146 BC)

Dark Age (ca.1100 BC - 750 BC)

Archaic Period (750 BC - 480 BC)

  • 776 Traditional date for the first historic Olympic games. The first Messenian war starts. (date disputed by Jerome, Pausanias and Diodorus this estimate is based on a reading of Diodorus' Spartan king lists and Pausanias' description of the war) Office of Archon reduced to 10 years. Members of the ruling family to hold the office starting with Charops. (dating based on Pausanias)
  • 754 Polydorus becomes king of Sparta.
  • 738 Alternate date for the end of the first Messenian war.
  • 735 Perdiccas I of Macedon flees from Argos to Macedonia and conquers the land.
  • 734 Polydorus sends colonists to Italy.
  • 727-717 Hippomenes, archon of Athens, who killed his daughter's adulterer by yoking him up to his chariot and then locks his daughter up with a horse until she dies. (Pausanias and Aristotle) 725 Lelantine War between Chalcis and Eretria. Many Greek cities are allied with one or the other. Dates before this point uncertain.
  • 719 Polydorus The king of Sparta is murdered by Polymarchus.
  • 716 The reign of the Heraklids over Lydia is ended when Candaules, known as Myrsilus to the Greeks, is murdered by Gyges because of his wife’s anger.
  • 690 Pheidon becomes tyrant of Argos Annual office of Archon established. Any Athenian citizen can be elected to office if they meet the requirements. Creon elected first annual archon. (dating based on Pausanias)
  • 685 The second Messenian war begins
  • 665 The second Messenian war ends
  • 656 Cypselus subjects Corinth to tyranny
  • 645-560 Spartan wars with Tegea all unsuccessful
  • 642 or 634 Battus establishes a Greek colony in Cyrene in LibyaCylon, Athenian noble, seizes Acropolis and tries to make himself king, fails Formal pederasty is introduced, first in Crete, as a means of population control and an educational modality Draco, Athenian lawgiver, issues code of laws where everything is punishable by death – Draconian Solon, Athenian statesman, becomes Archon pre-582BC (cf. ML6 (death of Kypselos 585BC) and Plutarch Sol. 14), captures Salamis from Megarians- later, when member of the Areopagus is appointed to effect social reforms in order to preserve order in Athens, which include the abolishment of the security of debts on the debtor's person (Aristotle Ath. Pol. 6), returning exiled Athenian slaves (Solon fr. 4 in Ath. Pol. 12), changing the value of weights and measures to the Korinthian standard, prohibiting the export of grain from Attica and encouraging the planting of olives (Plut. Sol. 22-4), established the property classes (Ar. Ath. Pol. 7) and the council of 400 (Ar. Ath. Pol. 8). Sappho, Greek poet and priestess, flourishes on island of Lesbos.
  • 569 Pythagoras was born. Peisistratos, Athenian general, organizes Diakrioi, party of poor people.
  • 546 Pythagoras founded science and philosophy.
  • 510 Pythagoras founded his own school.
  • 500 Pythagoras died in Crotona, Italy, when he was in Metapontum.

Late Archaic Period

    Pisistratus takes power in Athens for first time, Pisistratus driven out by Lycurgus who leads nobles Pisistratus restored by help of MegaclesCroesus, rich king of Lydia, captured at Sardis by PersiansPisistratus expelled, makes fortune from Thracian mines Pisistratus restored by Thessaly and Lygdamos of NaxosPisistratus dies, succeeded by sons Hippias and Hipparchus Persian Darius I, son-in-law of Cyrus the Great takes Egypt Hippias becomes sole ruler after the death of HipparchusHippias is forced to leave Athens. Cleisthenes, Greek reformer, takes power, increases democracy Themistocles and Miltiades, Athenians, defeat Darius at Marathon, Phidippides runs with news Aeschylus, Athenian playwright, wins Athenian Prize

Classical Period (480 BC - 323 BC)

    Leonidas, Spartan, makes sacrifice of 300 Spartans at the Battle of Thermopylae so main force can escape, Xerxes son of Darius is leading the Persians Simultaenous with Thermopylae, the Greeks and Persians fight to a draw in the naval Battle of ArtemisiumBattle of Salamis - Themistocles, Athenian general, lures Persians into Bay of Salamis, Xerxes loses and goes home, leaves behind MardoniusPausanias, Greek general routs Mardonius at the Battle of PlataeaBattle of Mycale frees Greek colonies in Asia. After the Battle of Salamis, Athens set up the Delian League, treasury on island of Delos, a confederacy of cities around the Aegean Sea. It was intended as a military defense association against Persia but was turned into an empire, collecting tribute and deciding policy of its associates. Sparta formed rival Peloponnesian League -462Cimon elected general each year, he was victorious over Persia and then enforced military power on Delian League Pindar, Greek poet moves to Thebes from court at SyracuseThemistoclesostracizedSophocles, Greek playwright, defeats Aeschylus for Athenian Prize Cimon ostracized Pericles, Athenian statesman begins Golden Age, he was taught by Anaxagoras, who believed in dualistic Universe and atoms Aeschylus dies Herodotus, Greek Historian, writes History of Greco-Persian War from 490-479 Ictinus and Callicrates, Greek architects rebuild Acropolis from Persian destruction Euripides, Greek playwright, wins Athenian prize Heraclitus, Greek philosopher, believes everything is mutable Phidias, Greek sculptor, completes Zeus at Elis 1 of 7 wonders Corinth, Sparta, Megara and Aegina ally against Corfu, Athens, Rhegium, and Leontini End of Golden Age, Athens under Pericles blockades Potidaea (Battle of Potidaea), Corfu declares war on Corinth (Battle of Sybota) Sparta led by Archidamus II sets out to destroy Athens thus starting the Peloponnesian WarEmpedocles, Greek doctor, believes body has Four Temperaments. Failed peace mission by Athens, bubonic plague year, Sparta takes no prisoners Leucippus, Greek philosopher, believes every natural event has natural cause. Athenian Plague appears in Athens. Phormio, Athenian admiral, wins the Battle of ChalcisPericles dies of Athenian Plague, possibly typhus or bubonic plagueHippocrates, Greek doctor, believes diseases have physical cause Plato born. Mitylene rebels, chief city of LesbosArchidamus II dies, Alcidas, Greek admiral sent to help Lesbos, raids Ionia and flees after seeing Athenian might Athenian Plague returns Mitylene surrenders to Athens, Plataeans surrender to Athens Aristophanes, Greek playwrong, wins Athenian Prize Corfu secures island for Athens Demosthenes, Athenian general, and Cleon, Athenian demagogue, revitalizes Athenian forces, makes bold plans opposed by Nicias, his first military campaign barely succeeds Athenian fleet bottles up Spartan navy at Navarino Bay, Nicias resigns Syracuse sends Athenians home Pagondas of Thebes crushes Athenian army at the Battle of Delium, Brasidas a Spartan general makes a successful campaign, Cleon exiles Thucydides for 20 years for arriving late Truce of Laches supposed to stop Brasidas but doesn't, Nicias leads Athenian forces in retaking MendeCleon meets Brasidas outside of Amphipolis, both are killed (Battle of Amphipolis) Peace of Nicias brings temporary end to war, but Alcibiades, a nephew of Pericles, makes anti-Sparta alliance Quadruple alliance of Athens, Argos, Mantinea, and Elis confronts Spartan-Boeotian alliance King Agis, ruler of Sparta, attacks Argos, makes treaty Battle of Mantinea, greatest land battle of war, gives Sparta victory over Argos, which broke treaty, Alcibiades thrown out, alliance broken Alcibiades makes plans, is restored to power Hermai are mutilated in Athens, Alcibiades accused, asks for inquiry, told to set sail for battle (Sicilian Expedition), is condemned to death in absentia, he defects to SpartaLemachus, Athenian commander killed at SyracuseNicias and Demosthenes killed at Syracuse Alcibiades is thrown out of Sparta, conspires to come back to Athens Democracy ends in Athens by Antiphon, Peisander, and Phrynichus, overthrown by Theramenes, Constitution of the 5000, Athenian navy recalls Alcibiades, confirmed by Athenians After several successes, Athenian demagogue Cleophon rejects Sparta peace overtures Byzantium recaptured by Alcibiades for AthensAlcibiades reenters Athens in triumph, Lysander, a Spartan commander, builds fleet at EphesusLysander begins destruction of Athenian fleet, Alcibiades stripped of power Callicratides, Spartan naval leader, loses Battle of Arginusae over blockade of Mitylene harbor, Sparta sues for peace, rejected by CleophonLysander captures Athenian fleet, Spartan king Pausanius lays siege to Athens, Cleophon executed, Corinth and Thebes demand destruction of Athens Athens capitulates Apr 25 Theramenes secures terms, prevents total destruction of Athens, Theramenes and Alcibiades are killed Thucydides, Greek historian, leaves account of Golden Age of Pericles and Peloponnesian War at his death (History of the Peloponnesian War) Socrates, Greek philosopher, condemned to death for corrupting youth. Peace of Antalcidas concluded between the Greeks and the Persians. Plato, Greek philosopher, founder of Academy, dies. Aristotle, Greek philosopher, begins teaching Alexander, son of Philip of MacedonPhilip of Macedon defeats Athens and Thebes at Chaeronea Aug 2 and establishes League of Corinth in winter of 338 BC/337 BC . Alexander succeeds father, who was assassinated by Pausanias of Orestis Alexander defeats Persians at Battle of Issus, Oct, but Darius III escapes Alexander conquers Egypt at Battle of Gaugamela Oct 1, Alexander ends Achaemenid Dynasty and takes Persian EmpireDemocritus, Greek philosopher, develops Atomic theory, believes cause and necessity, nothing comes out of nothing Alexander conquers Samarkand Alexander invades Northern India, but his army is despondent and refuses to march further eastwards.

Hellenistic Period (323 BC - 146 BC)

    Alexander dies, his generals vie for power in Wars of the Diadochi:Antigonus- Macedon, Antipater- Macedon, Seleucus- Babylonia and Syria, Ptolemy- Egypt, Eumenes- Macedon, Lysimachus, later Antipater's son Cassander also vies for power. - 322Lamian War. - 320 First War of the Diadochi. Partition of Triparadisus. - 311Second War of the Diadochi. Menander, Greek playwright, wins Athenian prize. Zeno of Citium founds his stoic school in Athens. Epicurus founds his philosophic school in Athens. Battle of Ipsus. Euclid, Greek mathematician, publishes Elements, treating both geometry and number theory (see also Euclidean algorithm). Athens falls to Demetrius, Lachares killed. - 275Pyrrhic War. Creation of the Achaean League. Gallic invasion of the Balkans. - 271First Syrian War. - 262Chremonidean War. Archimedes, Greek mathematician, develops screw, specific gravity, center of gravity anticipates discoveries of integral calculus. - 253Second Syrian War. - 241Third Syrian War. - 217Fourth Syrian War. - 205First Macedonian War. - 200Fifth Syrian War. - 196Second Macedonian War. - 188Roman–Syrian War. - 167Third Macedonian War. - 168Sixth Syrian War. - 148Fourth Macedonian War.

Cleon

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Cleon, (died 422 bc , Amphipolis, Macedonia), the first prominent representative of the commercial class in Athenian politics, he became leader of the Athenian democracy in 429 after the death of his political enemy, Pericles. In the Peloponnesian War he strongly advocated an offensive strategy. When Mytilene, which had revolted against Athens, fell in 427, Cleon proposed that all its citizens be put to death and the women and children enslaved. His decree was passed but rescinded the next day, in time to save Mytilene. He reached the summit of his fame by capturing the Spartans on the besieged island of Sphacteria in 425 after refusing their peace terms, but was defeated and killed at Amphipolis by the Spartan general Brasidas when trying to recover the cities of Thrace for the Athenian Empire. Cleon is represented by Aristophanes and Thucydides in an extremely unfavourable light, but neither can be considered an unprejudiced witness.


The Luciferian Crusade: A Collaborative Timeline

Here is two characters that could certainly make things interesting for the philosophy of the group:

A) Savitri Devi Mukherji (a.k.a. Maximiani Portaz) 1905-1982 creator and missionary of Aryan Neo-Paganism. Starting in 1948, she started preaching about the idea of a "New World Order". Apparently she even had an affair with Otto Skorzeny starting in 1961.

B) Barone Giulio Cesare Andrea Evola 1898-1974 Italian philosopher believed that humanity existed in a "dark age of unleashed materialistic appetites, spiritual oblivion and organised deviancy". To counter this and call in a primordial rebirth, he called for the creation of "the Tradition".

Now we just need someone to blend these beliefs and/or traditions with a form digestible to the Islamic world.

Orville_third

MerryPrankster

Jmberry

Something I've only seen done once before (in an RPG setting) but would be interesting is *Cobra Commander being an American war hero and nationalist who's convinced the USA's lost its way (Why? Any reason you want).

Oviously, you can modify this any way you want - an Englishman whose appaled by the Empire's breakup, a Tsarist nobleman, even a Mexican who wants California back. The point is it makes for a more interesting dynamic than the old "Survivng Nazis in Brazil" routine, allowing him to fight his homeland's traditional enemies (as the root of the problem) and his homeland (as traitors to its ideals).

DrakonFin

Mr_ Bondoc

Mr_ Bondoc

Another cool item for some people, are going to be the weapons and weapons systems. Can anyone submit some ideas or weapons that a "Cobra/ Brotherhood of Nod"-style organization would be able to obtain with the proper amount of money? The more powerful and the more unique ones would be intereresting to see.

Just remember that until the 1990s, they are relatively unable to maintain and/or secure territorial bases. After c.1995, all bets are off.

BlackWave

Another cool item for some people, are going to be the weapons and weapons systems. Can anyone submit some ideas or weapons that a "Cobra/ Brotherhood of Nod"-style organization would be able to obtain with the proper amount of money? The more powerful and the more unique ones would be intereresting to see.

Just remember that until the 1990s, they are relatively unable to maintain and/or secure territorial bases. After c.1995, all bets are off.

Mr_ Bondoc

That is certainly true for the history of the organization until roughly the early 1990s. But afterwards, consider what are some unusual weapons systems that they could obtain, that can either be bought or stolen by the organization in the 1990s until now? I am talking about threats like WMDs (nuclear, biological, chemical, et al.).

The stranger the better, especially for a "Cobra/Brotherhood of Nod"-style organization.

BlackWave

That is certainly true for the history of the organization until roughly the early 1990s. But afterwards, consider what are some unusual weapons systems that they could obtain, that can either be bought or stolen by the organization in the 1990s until now? I am talking about threats like WMDs (nuclear, biological, chemical, et al.).

The stranger the better, especially for a "Cobra/Brotherhood of Nod"-style organization.

Well, the most practical things it can get are suitcase bombs, dirty bombs, and the like. If we be generous and assume it has copious funding, it may get primitive ballistic weapons like SCUDs, although what it could do with them is another matter. Potentially, if it gets its tendrils into enough corporate bodies, it may be able to gain some space presence by basically leeching off a satellite belonging to an infiltrated corp.

So, while ion cannons and death rays are obviously out of the question, your classic terrorist WMDs certainly aren't.

Orville_third

Berra

I may repeat myself but I think Comintern and the communist party should be used more as a villain. For one, they where per definition a conspiracy (a group plotting to achive a goal) that managed to take control over many countries, managed to challange the US.

All this done by a small group of well motivated revolutionaries.

Mr_ Bondoc

I may repeat myself but I think Comintern and the communist party should be used more as a villain. For one, they where per definition a conspiracy (a group plotting to achive a goal) that managed to take control over many countries, managed to challange the US.

All this done by a small group of well motivated revolutionaries.

Brasidas

How about a PoD of 1940? Stronger support for Arab dissent by the Axis, more initial success in Egypt and Iraq, and a stronger subsequent crackdown.

Butterflies see Abedi, the eventual founder of BCCI, seeing his family and friends getting hurt more during the breakup of British India than OTL, opening things up for a greater personal animosity against India.

The Soviets hold on to northern Iran.

1956 sees Britain and France successfully retake the Suez Canal. Relations cool with the US.

France hangs on in Algeria a few years longer.

Pakistan-India goes nuclear. An unpopular puppet government is put in place, with a long, bloody insurgency. Abedi had sought work and begun a long climb up in Switzerland.

A revolt is launched in southern Iran, and crushed with direct western aid.

Abedi's selective financing nets him influence over a number of disparate organizations across north africa and the middle east. Over the decades they develop closer links but remain relatively decentralized.

A more partisan BCCI, more hostile middle east, and more of a potential for a bigger anti-west fight.

Mr_ Bondoc

How about a PoD of 1940? Stronger support for Arab dissent by the Axis, more initial success in Egypt and Iraq, and a stronger subsequent crackdown.

Butterflies see Abedi, the eventual founder of BCCI, seeing his family and friends getting hurt more during the breakup of British India than OTL, opening things up for a greater personal animosity against India.

The Soviets hold on to northern Iran.

1956 sees Britain and France successfully retake the Suez Canal. Relations cool with the US.

France hangs on in Algeria a few years longer.

Pakistan-India goes nuclear. An unpopular puppet government is put in place, with a long, bloody insurgency. Abedi had sought work and begun a long climb up in Switzerland.

A revolt is launched in southern Iran, and crushed with direct western aid.

Abedi's selective financing nets him influence over a number of disparate organizations across north africa and the middle east. Over the decades they develop closer links but remain relatively decentralized.

A more partisan BCCI, more hostile middle east, and more of a potential for a bigger anti-west fight.

If you can firm up some of the dates, I can certainly see it working. For the issue of Pakistan-India going nuclear , that still has to remain after c.1964 (the date when the USSR helps China gain the nuclear bomb). In OTL, India and didn't get weapons until 1974 in OTL.

I can see Iraqi Communist Party General-Secretary Aziz Muhammad launching a revolt in c.1978, in resistance to Saddam Hussein, with it collapsing before c. 1979/1980. As for Iran, Ali Khavari and Parviz Hekmatjoo could certainly launch a revolt against the Iranian government in c. 1979-1982.


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