History Podcasts

Hula Hoop patented

Hula Hoop patented


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

March 5, 1963: the Hula Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company’s co-founder, Arthur “Spud” Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone.

In 1948, friends Arthur Melin and Richard Knerr founded a company in California to sell a slingshot they created to shoot meat up to falcons they used for hunting. The company’s name, Wham-O, came from the sound the slingshots supposedly made. Wham-O eventually branched out from slingshots, selling boomerangs and other sporting goods. Its first hit toy, a flying plastic disc known as the Frisbee, debuted in 1957. The Frisbee was originally marketed under a different name, the Pluto Platter, in an effort to capitalize on America’s fascination with UFOs.

Melina and Knerr were inspired to develop the Hula Hoop after they saw a wooden hoop that Australian children twirled around their waists during gym class. Wham-O began producing a plastic version of the hoop, dubbed “Hula” after the hip-gyrating Hawaiian dance of the same name, and demonstrating it on Southern California playgrounds. Hula Hoop mania took off from there.

The enormous popularity of the Hula Hoop was short-lived and within a matter of months, the masses were on to the next big thing. However, the Hula Hoop never faded away completely and still has its fans today. According to Ripley’s Believe It or Not, in April 2004, a performer at the Big Apple Circus in Boston simultaneously spun 100 hoops around her body. Earlier that same year, in January, according to the Guinness World Records, two people in Tokyo, Japan, managed to spin the world’s largest hoop–at 13 feet, 4 inches–around their waists at least three times each.

Following the Hula Hoop, Wham-O continued to produce a steady stream of wacky and beloved novelty items, including the Superball, Water Wiggle, Silly String, Slip ‘n’ Slide and the Hacky Sack.

READ MORE: The History of Must-Have Holiday Toys


Hula Hoop patented - HISTORY

It’s the kind of invention that seems so simple, so obvious, one wonders how it took so long to actually come to the market. The spinning of thin, lightweight tubes over the body can be traced to civilizations living several centuries B.C. Records remain of hoop twirling in Britain as early as the 14th century, accompanied, as doctors have noted, by an epidemic of dislocated spines. In the 18th century, British sailors saw Hawaiian natives twirling hoops over their hips, similarly to their hula dance, and the term “hula hoop” was first coined. Still, only two companies came up with the idea of mass-producing the tube both in the latter half of the 20th century.

On this day, March 5, 1963, the “Hula Hoop” was patented, by Richard P. Knerr and Arthur K. “Spudd” Melin, co-owners of the Wham-O toy company. The duo was reportedly inspired by Australian children twirling wooden hoops (the toys were first manufactured in Austria in ‘57). The plastic tube under the trademarked name “Hula Hoop” made its debut in toy stores priced at $1.98.


The Invention of the Modern Hula Hoop

The modern hula hoop first rose to popularity in the late 1950s when it was marketed by the toy company Wham-O. Legend has it that the toy derived its name from British soldiers who had visited the Hawaiian Islands and thought the motion with the hoop looked similar to hula dancing.

Wham-O first got the idea from Australia where children played with hula hoops made of bamboo. The Australian company TolToys began marketing plastic hoops in Australia to meet the high demand for the toy, and it migrated to America where it took off as a toy and fitness phenomenon. To promote the hoop, Wham-O gave out free hoops, demonstrating their use at schools and playgrounds across California. In 1958, the first year of the hoop’s release in America, they sold over 100 million hoops. The original hoop sold for $1.58. And so, the hula hooping craze was born…

The hoop continued to evolve from its polyethylene origins to include beads inside the hoop, which produced noise when used. Hooping became so popular that a National Hula Hooping contest began in 1968 and ran until 1981. Judges evaluated contestants based on their ability to execute a variety of moves , including the Stork, Alley Oop, and Hula Hop.


Find out what's happening in Laguna Niguel-Dana Point with free, real-time updates from Patch.

Bio.com also says, "the enormous popularity of the Hula-Hoop was short-lived and within a matter of months, the masses were on to the next big thing. However, the Hula-Hoop never faded away completely and still has its fans today. According to Ripley's Believe It or Not, in April 2004, a performer at the Big Apple Circus in Boston simultaneously spun 100 hoops around her body. Earlier that same year, in January, according to the Guinness World Records, two people in Tokyo, Japan, managed to spin the world's largest hoop--at 13 feet, 4 inches--around their waists at least three times each.

"Following the Hula-Hoop, Wham-O continued to produce a steady stream of wacky and beloved novelty items, including the Superball, Water Wiggle, Silly String, Slip 'n' Slide and the Hacky Sack."


Patents: July–September

University of the Fraser Valley / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY 2.0

July saw the copyright of the name for that fun stuff known as Silly Putty (1952), the bane to all moms, and in July 1988, Bugs Bunny officially owned the phrase, “What’s Up, Doc?”

In August 1941, the first Jeep rolled off the assembly line, the Ford trademark was registered in August 1909, and The Beatles’ “Hey Jude,” was copyrighted in August 1968.

September was mostly quiet, except for one thing: The first major book to be printed using movable type, the Guttenberg Bible, was published in 1452.


Claims

a hula-hoop body for swinging around the body of a person, said hula-hoop body having a sliding way extending around the periphery thereof, the periphery of said hula-hoop body having an inner diameter and an outer diameter and at least one sliding member coupled to said hula-hoop body and movable along said sliding way wherein said hula-hoop body comprises a plurality of support members equiangularly spaced around the inner diameter thereof, and a belt fastened to said support members for swinging with said hula-hoop body around the body of a person wherein each said support member comprises a socket fixedly provided at the inner diameter of said hula-hoop body, a belt holder, which comprises a hollow holder body adapted to hold said belt around and a shank downwardly extending from a bottom side of said holder body and axially slidably coupled to said socket, and a spring member mounted inside said socket and stopped against the shank of said belt holder.

2. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 1, wherein said belt is inserted through the holder body of each said support member, having a male connector provided at a first end thereof, and a female connector provided at a second end thereof and connectable to said male connector.

a hula-hoop body for swinging around the body of a person, said hula-hoop body having a sliding way extending around the periphery thereof, the periphery of said hula-hoop body having an inner diameter and an outer diameter and at least one sliding member coupled to said hula-hoop body and movable along said sliding way, said hula-hoop body being comprised of a first semicircular half and a second semicircular half coupled together wherein said first semicircular half and said second semicircular half each have a first end and a second end, the first ends of said first and second semicircular halves being pivotally coupled together, the second ends of said first and second semicircular halves being detachably connected together with a quick-release lock and wherein said quick-release lock comprises a first lock part and a second lock part respectively provided at the second ends of said first and second semicircular halves, said first lock part comprising a bolt, which has a neck, said second lock part comprising a compression spring, a retaining spring plate supported on said compression spring, said retaining spring plate having a retaining hole adapted to receive said bolt, and a button connected to said retaining spring plate at one side opposite to said compression spring and extending to the outside of the second end of said second semicircular half for pressing by the user to elastically deform said retaining spring plate and to disengage said retaining hole from said bolt.

4. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 3, wherein said first lock part further comprises a plughole said second lock part further comprises a plug rod insertable into the plughole of said first lock part.

5. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 3, wherein said hula-hoop body comprises a first block pivotally connected to the first end of said first semicircular half, a second block fixedly provided at the first end of said second semicircular half and hinged to said first block, and lock means adapted to lock said second block to said first block.

6. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 5, wherein said lock means comprises a fixed retaining rod, which is fixedly fastened to said first block and has a hooked portion, a compression spring provided inside said second block, a movable retaining rod, which is pivotally mounted inside said second block and has a rear end supported on the compression spring inside said second block and a front end terminating in a hooked portion for hooking up with the hooked portion of said fixed retaining rod, and a button formed integral with the rear end of said movable retaining rod and extending to the outside of said second block opposite to the compression spring inside said second block for pressing by the user to bias said movable retaining rod and to disengage said movable retaining rod from said fixed retaining rod.

7. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 3, wherein said hula-hoop body comprises a plurality of support members equiangularly spaced around the inner diameter thereof, said support members each having a front bearing portion covered with a soft pad for supporting the hula-hoop around the body of a person.

8. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 7, wherein said hula-hoop body comprises a plurality of support members equiangularly spaced around the inner diameter thereof, and a belt fastened to said support members for swinging with said hula-hoop body around the body of a person.

9. The hula-hoop as claimed in claim 8, wherein said hula-hoop body comprises a plurality of support members equiangularly spaced around the inner diameter thereof, each said support member having a front bearing portion covered with a soft pad for supporting said hula-hoop body around the body of a person.


Richard Knerr (1925–2008 [2] ) and Arthur "Spud" Melin (1924–2002 [3] ), two University of Southern California graduates who had been friends since their teens, were unhappy with their jobs and decided to start their own business. In 1948 they formed the WHAM-O Manufacturing Company in the Knerr family garage in South Pasadena. Their first product was the Wham-O Slingshot, made of ash wood, which Knerr and Melin promoted by holding demonstrations of their own slingshot skills. The name "Wham-O" was inspired by the sound of the slingshot's shot hitting the target. [4] The powerful slingshot was adopted by clubs for competitive target shooting and small game hunting. [5] When they outgrew the garage, Knerr and Melin rented a building on S. Marengo Ave in Alhambra, California and then, in 1955, moved their manufacturing plant to neighboring San Gabriel, California.

In 1957, Wham-O, still a fledgling company, took the idea of Australian bamboo "exercise hoops", manufactured them in Marlex, and called their new product the Hula Hoop. (The name had been used since the 18th century, but till then had not been registered as a trademark.) The Hula-Hoop became the biggest toy fad in modern history. [6] [7] Twenty-five million were sold in four months, and in two years sales reached more than 100 million. [8] "Hula Hoop mania" continued through the end of 1959, and netted Wham-O $45 million (equivalent to $400 million in 2021 [9] ).

Shortly thereafter, the company had another huge success with the Frisbee. In 1955 inventor Fred Morrison began marketing a plastic flying disc called the Pluto Platter. He sold the design to Wham-O in 1957. In 1959 Wham-O marketed a slightly modified version of the toy, which they renamed the Frisbee—and once again a Wham-O toy became a common part of life through the 1960s.

In the early 1960s Wham-O created the Super Ball, a high-bouncing ball made of a hard elastomer Polybutadiene alloy, dubbed Zectron, with a 0.92 coefficient of restitution when bounced on hard surfaces. Around 20 million Super Balls were sold that decade, and the NFL named the Super Bowl games after it. [10]

The Frisbee and Hula Hoop created fads. With other products, Wham-O tried to capitalize on existing national trends. In the 1960s they produced a US$119 do-it-yourself bomb shelter cover. In 1962, they sold a limbo dance kit to take advantage of that fad and in 1975, when the movie Jaws was released, they sold plastic shark teeth.

Many products were not successful. During an African safari in the early 1960s, Melin discovered a species of fish that laid eggs in the mud during Africa's dry season. When the rains came, the eggs hatched and fish emerged overnight. This inspired Melin to create the Instant Fish product, an aquarium kit consisting of some of the fish eggs, and some mud in which to hatch them.

  • Wham-O Bird Ornithopter toy (1959) sold in a large cardboard box ready to fly. Made of aluminum spars, wood, steel wire and Mylar this toy was brightly painted to resemble a hawk or owl. The retail price for the rubber band powered Wham-O Bird was $3 each, (about $24 in 2020 money), and about 600,000 were manufactured.
  • (1966) for wheelie bikes, especially well suited for the popular Schwinn Sting-Ray. The packaging design, featuring 1960s icon Rat Fink, was widely reproduced on T-shirts, posters and decals. The television commercial featured Kathryn Minner, the original Little Old Lady from Pasadena.
  • Air Blaster (1965), which shot a puff of air that could blow out a candle at 20 feet [11] (1988), a flexible plastic strip attached to a wand, which was dipped in soap solution and waved through the air to create giant soap bubbles. Ads claimed it could make bubbles "as long as a bus"
  • Huf'n Puf blowgun that shot soft rubber darts[12]
  • Real (non-toy) crossbows, machetes, boomerangs and throwing knives[13][14]
  • Powermaster .22 caliber single-shot target pistol, sold by mail order (1956), [15] and several other .22 caliber weapons (1961), a carpet-like, water-lubricated sliding surface (1962), [16] a plastic-enclosed curved nozzle that, when powered by a garden hose, became airborne.
  • Monster Magnet (1964) [17]
  • Super Sneaky Squirtin' Stick (1964) [18]
  • Willie (1964), a furry toy snake [19] (1966) [20]
  • Giant Comics (1967) [21] (1969) (1970)
  • Magic Window (1971), two 30 by 30 centimetres (12 in × 12 in) oval plates of heavy clear plastic, with a narrow channel between them containing "microdium" (glass) crystal sands of varying colors that created complex patterns when shifted. [22][23] ) (1980), sand coated with a hydrophobic material that caused water to bead off of it rather than being absorbed (1983) , a footbag design purchased from its inventors in 1983 (1990s)
  • EZ SPIN Foam Frisbee Disc (2008), [24] a soft version of the Frisbee that could be used indoors world's smallest, lightest e-bike in the world that fits into the backpack
  • Wham-O Frisbee Sonic

Wham-O's initial success was a result of its founders' insight. Knerr and Melin marketed their products directly to kids, including demonstrating their toys at playgrounds. They extensively researched new product ideas, including traveling around the world. [25] “If Spud and I had to say what we contributed,” Knerr said, “it was fun. But I think this country gave us more than we gave it. It gave us the opportunity to do it." [26]

For many years, the company's strategy was to maintain eight to twelve simple, inexpensive products such as Frisbees, Super Balls, and Hula Hoops. New products were developed for tryout periods. Old ones were retired, for a few years or permanently, as their popularity waned. Since the toys were simple and inexpensive, they could be sold by a wide range of retailers, from large Department Stores to five and dime stores.

As Wham-O changed ownership, its new management adjusted this formula to accommodate the changing toy industry, which had increasingly complex toys and fewer distribution channels.

By 2006 Wham-O's product line included several groups of related items using licensed brand names. For example, Sea-Doo is a brand of personal water craft owned by Bombardier Wham-O makes a Sea-Doo line of small inflatable rafts designed to be towed behind watercraft.

The company's lines are also more complex, and grouped in related categories—for example, the Sea-Doo line (about a dozen products), several Slip 'N Slide variations, and a group of "lawn games".

On January 31, 2011, Wham-O announced an agreement with ICM, the agency representing Atari video games, to represent Wham-O in movies, television, music, and online content based around its toys. [27]


Hula Hoop patented - HISTORY

On this day in 1963, the Hula-Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company&rsquos co-founder, Arthur &ldquoSpud&rdquo Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula-Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone.

In 1948, friends Arthur Melin and Richard Knerr founded a company in California to sell a slingshot they created to shoot meat up to falcons they used for hunting. The company&rsquos name, Wham-O, came from the sound the slingshots supposedly made. Wham-O eventually branched out from slingshots, selling boomerangs and other sporting goods. Its first hit toy, a flying plastic disc known as the Frisbee, debuted in 1957. The Frisbee was originally marketed under a different name, the Pluto Platter, in an effort to capitalize on America&rsquos fascination with UFOs.

Stop breadboarding and soldering &ndash start making immediately! Adafruit&rsquos Circuit Playground is jam-packed with LEDs, sensors, buttons, alligator clip pads and more. Build projects with Circuit Playground in a few minutes with the drag-and-drop MakeCode programming site, learn computer science using the CS Discoveries class on code.org, jump into CircuitPython to learn Python and hardware together, TinyGO, or even use the Arduino IDE. Circuit Playground Express is the newest and best Circuit Playground board, with support for CircuitPython, MakeCode, and Arduino. It has a powerful processor, 10 NeoPixels, mini speaker, InfraRed receive and transmit, two buttons, a switch, 14 alligator clip pads, and lots of sensors: capacitive touch, IR proximity, temperature, light, motion and sound. A whole wide world of electronics and coding is waiting for you, and it fits in the palm of your hand.

Have an amazing project to share? The Electronics Show and Tell is every Wednesday at 7pm ET! To join, head over to YouTube and check out the show&rsquos live chat &ndash we&rsquoll post the link there.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Maker Business &mdash Global shipping still hasn’t righted itself

Python for Microcontrollers &mdash Python on Microcontrollers Newsletter: MicroPython 1.16 is out and more! #Python #Adafruit #CircuitPython @micropython @ThePSF

Adafruit IoT Monthly &mdash Toddler Clock, Predictive Weather Station, and more!

Microsoft MakeCode &mdash Bring Coding to your Classroom with Microsoft MakeCode!

EYE on NPI &mdash Maxim’s Himalaya uSLIC Step-Down Power Module #EyeOnNPI @maximintegrated @digikey

New Products – Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers! &mdash JP’s Product Pick of the Week 6/22/21 NeoKey 1×4 QT @adafruit @johnedgarpark #adafruit #newproductpick


This Day in History: Mar 5, 1963: Hula-Hoop patented

On this day in 1963, the Hula-Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company's co-founder, Arthur "Spud" Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula-Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone.

In 1948, friends Arthur Melin and Richard Knerr founded a company in California to sell a slingshot they created to shoot meat up to falcons they used for hunting. The company’s name, Wham-O, came from the sound the slingshots supposedly made. Wham-O eventually branched out from slingshots, selling boomerangs and other sporting goods. Its first hit toy, a flying plastic disc known as the Frisbee, debuted in 1957. The Frisbee was originally marketed under a different name, the Pluto Platter, in an effort to capitalize on America's fascination with UFOs.

Melina and Knerr were inspired to develop the Hula-Hoop after they saw a wooden hoop that Australian children twirled around their waists during gym class. Wham-O began producing a plastic version of the hoop, dubbed "Hula" after the hip-gyrating Hawaiian dance of the same name, and demonstrating it on Southern California playgrounds. Hula-Hoop mania took off from there.


The enormous popularity of the Hula-Hoop was short-lived and within a matter of months, the masses were on to the next big thing. However, the Hula-Hoop never faded away completely and still has its fans today. According to Ripley's Believe It or Not, in April 2004, a performer at the Big Apple Circus in Boston simultaneously spun 100 hoops around her body. Earlier that same year, in January, according to the Guinness World Records, two people in Tokyo, Japan, managed to spin the world's largest hoop--at 13 feet, 4 inches--around their waists at least three times each.


Following the Hula-Hoop, Wham-O continued to produce a steady stream of wacky and beloved novelty items, including the Superball, Water Wiggle, Silly String, Slip 'n' Slide and the Hacky Sack.

In South Africa: SA troops invade East Africa in their confrontation with German forces in World War I

Britain had fought the Boer settlers in South Africa in the Anglo-Boer wars (1880-1, 1899-1902), so in 1914 many Afrikaaners sympathised with Germany. While Prime Minister, Botha was raising an expedition to invade German South West Africa, pro-German Boers raised a rebellion against British authority. This was not fully suppressed until early 1915 and only then could the invasion of South West Africa be fully launched. On 5 March 1916 South African Troops, led by General Jan Smuts, invaded East Africa in their confrontation with German forces.

More than 146 000 Whites, 83 000 Blacks and 2 500 people of mixed race and Asians served in South African military units during the war, including 43,000 in German South-West Africa and 30 000 on the Western Front. An estimated 3,000 South Africans also joined the Royal Flying Corps. The total number of South African casualties during the war was approximately 7000 dead and 12 000 wounded by 1918.

South Africa greatly assisted the Allies, and Great Britain in particular, in capturing the two German colonies of German West Africa and German East Africa (although many South African troops were tied down by the failure to capture all the German East Africa forces) as well as in battles in Western Europe and the Middle East. South Africa's ports and harbors, such as at Cape Town, Durban, and Simon's Town, were also important rest-stops, refueling-stations, and served as strategic assets to the British Royal Navy during the war, helping to keep the vital sea lanes to the British Raj open.


Toy Building Brick (aka Legos)

Since its founding in 1932, the Danish corporation The Lego Group has been primarily involved in the creation of toys and playthings over the years. Despite some critical voices on the use of plastics instead of natural wood for children’s playthings, Lego began manufacturing plastic toys by the end of the 1940s. However, the interlocking plastic block the company released in 1958 and named the Lego exploded in popularity, eventually earning the honor of being chosen the “Toy of the Century” by both the British Toy Retailers Association as well as Fortune.

Lego received U.S. Patent No. 3,005,282, on July 28, 1958, protecting the design and manufacture of their toy building brick in October 1961. As the patent states, the blocks are designed to connect through projections extending away from the block which can engage with protrusions on adjacent blocks. This design, also known as a stud-and-tube coupling system, allows children to create thousands of unique works with even just a few blocks.


Mar 5, 1963: Hula-Hoop Patented

On this day in 1963, the Hula-Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company’s co-founder, Arthur “Spud” Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula-Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone.

In 1948, friends Arthur Melin and Richard Knerr founded a company in California to sell a slingshot they created to shoot meat up to falcons they used for hunting. The company’s name, Wham-O, came from the sound the slingshots supposedly made. Wham-O eventually branched out from slingshots, selling boomerangs and other sporting goods. Its first hit toy, a flying plastic disc known as the Frisbee, debuted in 1957. The Frisbee was originally marketed under a different name, the Pluto Platter, in an effort to capitalize on America’s fascination with UFOs.

Melina and Knerr were inspired to develop the Hula-Hoop after they saw a wooden hoop that Australian children twirled around their waists during gym class. Wham-O began producing a plastic version of the hoop, dubbed “Hula” after the hip-gyrating Hawaiian dance of the same name, and demonstrating it on Southern California playgrounds. Hula-Hoop mania took off from there.

The enormous popularity of the Hula-Hoop was short-lived and within a matter of months, the masses were on to the next big thing. However, the Hula-Hoop never faded away completely and still has its fans today. According to Ripley’s Believe It or Not, in April 2004, a performer at the Big Apple Circus in Boston simultaneously spun 100 hoops around her body. Earlier that same year, in January, according to the Guinness World Records, two people in Tokyo, Japan, managed to spin the world’s largest hoop–at 13 feet, 4 inches–around their waists at least three times each.

Following the Hula-Hoop, Wham-O continued to produce a steady stream of wacky and beloved novelty items, including the Superball, Water Wiggle, Silly String, Slip ‘n’ Slide and the Hacky Sack.


Watch the video: A History of the Hoola Hoop (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Odhert

    In my opinion you are mistaken. I can prove it.

  2. Elisheba

    Well written.

  3. Agyfen

    I actually didn't like it)

  4. Ojo

    remarkably, the very funny phrase

  5. German

    Respect to the author for the topic. Kept it on my computer, it expresses itself very well

  6. Kenris

    I think mistakes are made. I propose to discuss it. Write to me in PM, speak.



Write a message