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Chimo ACM- - History

Chimo ACM- - History

Chimo II

(ACM-1: dp. 880, 1. 188'2", b. 37', dr. 12'6"; s. 12 k.
cpl. 69; a. 1 40mm.; cl. Chimo)

The second Chimo (ACM-1) was built as Colonel Charles W. Bundy for the Army by Marietta Manufacturing Co., Point Pleasant, W. Va.; converted at Norfolk Navy Yard, acquired by the Navy 7 April 1944, commissioned the same day, Lieutenant J. W. Gross, USNR, in command; and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

Chimo sailed from Norfolk 13 May 1944 for Plymouth England and the Normandy beaches. She lay at anchor off Utah Beach from 7 to 19 June as flagship of Commander Minesweepers West, providing tender services to British and United States minesweeping forces as they kept lanes open for the movement of supplies vital to the invasion buildup. Between 20 June 1944 and 5 March 1945, Chimo operated from Plymouth along the coast of France at Cherbourg, Baie de St. Brieuc, and Brest. She cleared Plymouth 5 March for overhaul in the States and on 11 June, departed Norfolk arriving at San Diego 3 July for voyage repairs and training. In mid-September 1945, Chimo began duty off Eniwetok, Saipan, and Okinawa until 1 February 1946, when she put into Sasebo. Chimo cleared Sasebo 10 March for Saipan, Eniwetok, Pearl Harbor, and San Francisco, arriving 16 April. Chimo was decommissioned 21 May 1946, transferred to the War Shipping Administration and sold 28 September 1948.

Chimo received two battle stars for World War II service.


USS Obstructor

Built by the Marietta Manufacturing Company in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, as a U.S. Army mine planter, USAMP 1st Lt. William G. Sylvester (MP-5) was delivered in December 1942 [1] to the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps, Mine Planter Service. She was named for the first coast artillery officer killed (at Hickam Field, Hawaii, on 7 December 1941) [2] in action in World War II. Sylvester's embarked crew, designated, in Army terminology as the 12th Coast Artillery Mine Planter Battery, was implemented in November 1942 stationed at Fort Miles, Delaware. [3]

The ship was transferred to the Navy on 4 January 1945. She was renamed Obstructor on 19 January 1945, converted at the Charleston Navy Yard and commissioned on 1 April 1945 with Lt. Sammie Smith, USN in command.

After transfer to the United States Coast Guard in 1946 the ship was commissioned 1 February 1947 as USCGC Heather until 15 December 1967.


Minelayers of the United States Navy

British employed the Abdiel minelayers both as minelayers and as transports to isolated garrisons, such as Malta and Tobruk. Their combination of high speed
of the United States Navy For destroyer escorts, see List of destroyer escorts of the United States Navy and for destroyer minelayers see List of mine
transferred to the United States Coast Guard in San Francisco on 20 June 1946 and struck from the Navy List on 19 July 1946. The former auxiliary minelayer served
minelayer at the New York Navy Yard. Classified CMc - 3 on 30 December 1940 and renamed USS Wassuc on 10 January 1941, the ship was commissioned at the
The Kamishima class minelayer 神島型敷設艇, , Kamishima - gata Fusetsutei was a class of minelayers of the Imperial Japanese Navy IJN serving during and after
The second USS Chimo ACM - 1 was the lead ship of her class of minelayers in the United States Navy during World War II. Chimo was built as USAMP Colonel
until The United States Shipping Board took control of the ship from Old Dominion Steamship Company in 1917. She was fitted out for United States Navy service
was a minelayer in the United States Navy Commissioned as Massachusetts, she was renamed Shawmut a month later, and in 1928, was renamed after the Oglala
This is a list of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy USS Chimo ACM - 1 USS Planter ACM - 2 USS Barricade ACM - 3 USS Buttress ACM - 4 USS Barbican ACM - 5
ACM - 9 was a Chimo - class minelayer in the United States Navy in World War II. Trapper was built 1942 for the United States Army as U.S. Army Mine Planter
Keihassalmi pennant number 05 was a minelayer of the Finnish Navy She was commissioned in 1957 and remained in service until 1994, after which she
Sons of Philadelphia. It was acquired by the United States Navy on 15 June 1942 renamed Weehawken on 18 July 1942 converted to a minelayer by the Bethlehem

auxiliary minelayer in the United States Navy It was named for Canonicus, a chief of the Narragansett Indians. Canonicus was originally delivered to the United
This list of cruisers of the United States Navy includes all ships that were ever called cruiser Since the nomenclature predates the hull numbering
The Abdiel class were a class of six fast minelayers commissioned into the Royal Navy and active during the Second World War. They were also known as
The United States Navy United States Coast Guard, and United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA use a hull classification symbol
blue - water navy and brown - water navy It is a non - doctrinal naval term used in different ways. It originates with the United States Navy who use it
is a List of World War II vessel types of the United States using during World War II. This list includes submarines, battleships, minelayers oilers
minelayers was a group of four vessels of the Spanish Republican Navy built during the Spanish Republic. Three of them came into service during the Civil


Chimo (ACM-1) Class: Photographs

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway at Jacksonville, Florida, on 27 June 1945 before conversion to a minesweeper support ship.
This photo shows the appearance of ACM 1-3 during their service in Europe in 1944 and early 1945.

Photo No. 19-N-87640
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Underway at Jacksonville, Florida, on 27 June 1945 before conversion to a minesweeper support ship.
Visible features of this conversion were the addition of two large reels on the stern, the removal of the boom on the mainmast, and the raising of the searchlight platform to a higher position on the foremast. This image is blurred by a double exposure.

Photo No. 19-N-87641
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Near the Charleston, S.C. Navy Yard on 16 March 1945 after conversion.

Photo No. 19-N-79421
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Near the Charleston, S.C. Navy Yard on 16 March 1945 after conversion.

Photo No. 19-N-79427
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

Photo No. NH 79740
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

Photographed circa late 1945.

Photo No. NH 79737
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

Photographed circa the early 1960s.
This vessel served as USS Trapper in 1945-1946 and was reacquired from the Coast Guard, which had converted her into a cable layer, in 1959.


Contents

Pacific Theatre operations [ edit | edit source ]

Following shakedown in Chesapeake Bay, Obstructor, a minesweep gear and repair ship, loaded gear and other supplies at Norfolk, Virginia, and sailed on 11 June 1945 for the Panama Canal. Transiting the canal on 21 June, she proceeded up the coast to San Diego. There at the end of the war, she sailed for the Far East on 18 August. Steaming via the Marshalls and the Marianas, she arrived at Manila and reported for duty with MinRon 106 on 8 October. On 17 October she got underway for Haiphong, arriving and joining task unit TU 74.4 on 22 October. Assuming duties as flagship, MinRon 106, the same day, Obstructor served as a minecraft tender for that task unit as it operated off Haiphong harbor, the island of Hainan and off Chinese ports during the next six months.

Decommissioning [ edit | edit source ]

In early May 1946, she sailed east en route back to the United States. Arriving at San Francisco on 15 June, she was decommissioned and was transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard on 28 June and was struck from the Navy List on 19 July 1946.


We have recently completed the sixth in a series of "Message Understanding Conferences" which are designed to promote and evaluate research in information extraction. MUC-6 introduced several innovations over prior MUCs, most notably in the range of different tasks for which evaluations were conducted. We describe some of the motivations for the new format and briefly discuss some of the results of the evaluations.

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Contents

Pacific Theatre operations [ edit ]

Picket departed Charleston, South Carolina on 11 March 1945, and arrived Little Creek, Virginia, 13 March. Following shakedown, she reported for duty 3 April to Commander, Service Force, Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia. Loaded with minesweeping equipment, she departed Norfolk 26 April, transited the Panama Canal 7 May, and arrived San Diego, 20 May. Following training, Picket departed San Diego 9 June, and proceeded via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, and Saipan to Okinawa, arriving 28 July to serve as minesweeper tender.

Picket departed Okinawa on 16 August, and, following rendezvous with Task Force 31 on the 21st, she entered Tokyo Bay on the 28th. With minesweepers, she departed Tokyo Bay on 12 September, and arrived at Wakayama, Japan, on the 14th.

Sailing from Kii Suido on 20 September, she entered the Inland Sea on the 22nd. Through 31 October she operated with minesweepers to clear the approaches to Hiro, Kure, Gunchū, and Matsuyama for U.S. Army landings.

Navy Decommissioning [ edit ]

Following postwar occupation duties, Picket returned to the United States. She decommissioned 24 June 1946, and was transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard that date. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 19 July 1946.


Contents

Normandy invasion operations

Chimo sailed from Norfolk on 13 May 1944 for Plymouth and the Normandy beaches. She lay at anchor off Utah Beach from 7 to 19 June as flagship of Commander Minesweepers West, providing tender services to British and United States minesweeping forces as they kept lanes open for the movement of supplies vital to the invasion buildup. Between 20 June 1944 and 5 March 1945, Chimo operated from Plymouth along the coast of France at Cherbourg, bay of Saint-Brieuc, and Brest. She cleared Plymouth on 5 March for overhaul in the States and on 11 June, departed Norfolk arriving at San Diego on 3 July for voyage repairs and training.

Pacific Ocean operations

In mid-September 1945, Chimo began duty off Eniwetok, Saipan, and Okinawa until 1 February 1946, when she put into Sasebo. Chimo cleared Sasebo on 10 March for Saipan, Eniwetok, Pearl Harbor, and San Francisco, arriving 16 April.

Decommissioning

Chimo was decommissioned 21 May 1946, transferred to the War Shipping Administration and sold 28 September 1948. The ship was sold 1963 to become tuna seiner MV Day Island. Ώ]


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Cochran, Anita, Editor
Communications of the ACM
October 1987, Vol. 30, Issue 10
pp. 866-872

The First 25 Years: ACM 1947–1972
Revens, Lee, Editor
Communications of the ACM
July 1972, Vol. 15, Issue 7
pp. 485-490

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